Oct 18, 2021  
2021-2022 Endicott College Academic Catalog 
  
2021-2022 Endicott College Academic Catalog

School of Social Sciences, Communication & Humanities - Undergraduate Programs


Programs

American Studies
American Studies Minor

Chinese Studies
Chinese Studies Minor

Communication
Communication Major (Bachelor of Science)
Communication Minor

Criminal Justice
Criminal Justice Major (Bachelor of Science)
Criminal Justice Minor
Security Studies Minor

Digital Media (Filmmaking & Journalism)
Digital Media Major/Digital Journalism Concentration (Bachelor of Science)
Digital Media Major/TV/Film Production Concentration (Bachelor of Science)
Digital Journalism Minor

English
English Major/Creative Writing Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)
English Major/Literature and Language Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)
English Major/Secondary Education Teacher Licensure Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)
Creative Writing Minor
English Minor
Professional Writing Minor

Gender Studies
Gender Studies Minor

History
History Major (Bachelor of Arts)
History Major/Public History Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)
History Major/Secondary Education Teacher Licensure Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)
History Minor

Human Services
Human Services Minor

Integrated Studies
Integrated Studies (Associate in Science)

International Studies
International Studies Major (Bachelor of Arts)
International Studies Minor

Legal Studies
Legal Studies Minor

Liberal Studies
Liberal Studies Major (Bachelor of Arts)
Liberal Studies/Individually Designed Major (Bachelor of Arts)
Liberal Studies/Education-Go to School of Education
Peace and Conflict Studies Minor

Marketing Communication/Advertising
Marketing Communication/Advertising Major (Bachelor of Science)

Philosophy 
Philosophy Minor

Political Science
Political Science Major (Bachelor of Science)
Political Science Minor

Psychology
Psychology Major (Bachelor of Science)
Psychology Minor

Religion
Religious Studies Minor

Sociology
Sociology Minor

Spanish
Spanish Minor

American Studies

 


American Studies Minor


 

Chinese

 


Chinese Studies Minor


Students who elect to minor in Chinese Studies will be encouraged, but not required, to study abroad in China.

Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

 

Communication

The general communication major provides students the opportunity to explore the breadth of the field and graduate with knowledge and skills applicable to numerous career paths. The communication major allows students to pursue their own areas of interest and add a minor if they choose.

 


Communication Major (Bachelor of Science)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125


Freshman - Credits: 32


  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Media Explorations Elective   (Cr: 3)
  • Elective  (Cr: 3)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Elective   (Cr: 3)
  • Media Making Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Media Writing Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Elective   (Cr: 3)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • Media Making Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Media Writing Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Electives   (Cr: 9)   (two must be above the 100 level)

Media Explorations Electives


Students choose one from the following list. 

  • CMM Elective (must be above the 400 level)  Cr: 3)

Media Writing Electives


Students choose two from the following list:

Learning Outcomes


Upon completion of the communication program, students will:

  • During the first year, develop a basic understanding of theories and concepts in the field of communication.
  • Articulate the core ethical values underlying best practices in the production of media (marketing communication, internet studies, digital journalism, digital filmmaking).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the research methods used in the many fields encompassed under the umbrella of communication (marketing communication, internet studies, digital journalism, digital filmmaking).
  • Articulate the complexity of media’s place in society and culture.
  • Communicate effectively in written form within the conventions of the communication discipline.
  • Demonstrate the critical inquiry and analysis skills needed to engage constructively in intellectual discourse within the Communication discipline.
  • Demonstrate integrated learning skills by making connections between classroom learning and professional life in the discipline.
  • Demonstrate skills and technological knowledge to create content for various communication platforms.
  


Communication Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take 18 credits as follows:

   

Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice is a multi-disciplinary academic program that educates students to be critical thinkers while imparting a comprehensive understanding of the operation and impact of the criminal justice field. The criminal justice degree embraces the broad scope of the criminal justice discipline. Core courses in the major allow students to study the criminal justice process; causes of crime and its impact; law enforcement systems; legal adjudication procedures and systems; the history and contemporary use of technology in criminal justice systems; and the correctional field. The program follows the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences’ Standards for Criminal Justice Education and meets the standards of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Higher Education.
 
Security Studies

To broaden career opportunities, many students majoring in criminal justice elect to complete course work leading to a minor in security studies. The security studies minor can provide students with an interdisciplinary background to understanding domestic and international threats to homeland security and risk management. For more information, please refer to the “Minor Programs of Study” section. In addition, Endicott College offers a Master of Science degree in homeland security for students interested in pursuing a more advanced degree in this field. Students may opt to complete the bachelor’s and master’s degree in five years.

Internships

Internships in criminal justice and security studies are geared for the practical application of the academic experience. Internships are utilized to provide the student with hands-on experience and practical knowledge within the criminal justice system and/or homeland security. The combination of coursework and internships provides the student with a superior education necessary for success in these professional areas.

Examples of internships include:
ATF - Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms
Boston Regional Intelligence Center (BRIC)
Correctional facilities and halfway houses
Crime labs
Crime Victims’ Advocates offices
Department of Social Services
Department of Youth Services
District Attorneys’ offices
FBI - Federal Bureau of Investigation
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center
Juvenile courts
Marine Patrol
Massachusetts State Police Arson and Bomb Squad
Municipal police departments
Probation offices
State Police Training Academy
TSA - Transportation Safety Administration
United States Marshals Service

 


Criminal Justice Major (Bachelor of Science)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125


Freshman - Credits: 32


  • Foreign Language   (Cr: 6) 
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Criminal Justice Elective (Cr:3)

Sophomore - Credits: 32-33


  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3-4)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Elective   (Cr: 3)
  • Criminal Justice Elective (Cr: 3)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Criminal Justice Electives   (Cr: 9)
  • General Education Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Elective   (Cr: 3)

Senior - Credits: 30


  • General Education Electives   (Cr: 9)
    (two must be above the 100 level)
  • Elective  (Cr: 3)

Learning Outcomes


Upon completion of the criminal justice program, students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in criminal justice.
  • Apply basic research methods in criminal justice, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation.
  • Apply basic criminal justice concepts and principles to real world settings.
  • Communicate effectively in written form within the conventions of the discipline.
  • Demonstrate the critical inquiry and analysis skills needed to engage constructively in academic discourse within the discipline.
 


Criminal Justice Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

Additional Required Courses


Students select two from the following courses:

Additional Courses


Students select two criminal justice electives at the 300 level or above. Criminal Justice electives include any course with a CJ designation and:

 


Security Studies Minor


 

Digital Media

The digital media major provides a blend of visual, oral, and written communication. It is offered in two concentrations, digital filmmaking and digital journalism, which share a common core of courses that explore the synergy between the functional methods of journalism (writing and interviewing) and the applied production skills of the filmmaking. Both concentrations emphasize skill development throughout the storytelling process, from understanding the methods needed to develop a story to actively utilizing the tools to successfully create the narrative.

  


Digital Media Major/Digital Journalism Concentration (Bachelor of Science)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits: 125


Freshman - Credits: 32


  • Global Issues General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Elective  (Cr: 3)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Journalism Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Elective  (Cr: 3)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • Political Science course (300 level)  (Cr; 3)
  • Journalism Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Electives  (Cr: 6) (must be above the 100 level)
  • Elective  (Cr: 3)

Learning Outcomes


Upon completion of the digital media program students will:

  • Demonstrate their understanding of multiple modes of narrative and documentary story-telling.
  • Create a culminating digital presentation that demonstrates the way theory informs applied professional practice.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the research methods used in the many fields encompassed under the umbrella of digital media.
  • Articulate the complexity of digital media’s place in society and culture.
  • Communicate effectively in written form within the conventions of the discipline.
  • Demonstrate the critical inquiry and analysis skills needed to engage constructively in intellectual discourse within the disciplines of digital media.
  • Demonstrate integrated learning skills by making connections between classroom learning and professional life in the disciplines of digital media.
  


Digital Media Major/TV/Film Production Concentration (Bachelor of Science)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125


Freshman - Credits: 32


  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3) 
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Elective  (Cr: 3)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Elective  (Cr: 3)
  


Digital Journalism Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

  

English

The English major offers concentrations in Creative Writing, Literature and Language, and Secondary Education teacher licensure. All English majors take courses that provide them with essential knowledge of literary history, terms, and genres. Students concentrating in Creative Writing develop their own voices through focused writing courses while taking courses in literature to discover how their own writing fits into or departs from literary traditions. Students concentrating in literature and language follow a program in which they receive a strong foundation in American, British, and world literature, as well as contemporary critical approaches to literary analysis. Students in the Secondary Education concentration take a range of education courses in addition to required English classes, and become licensed middle or high school English teachers in Massachusetts.

Through their courses, English majors develop critical thinking, writing, and communication skills necessary for success in any career. They apply these skills in a wide range of exciting internship settings such as publishing houses, colleges and universities, newspapers, libraries, museums, law firms, corporations, and startups. Many English majors participate in the student-run Endicott Review and the Odyssey online magazine, and have opportunities to publish in the Endicott College/Ibbetson Street Press Young Poets Series. Experiences in and beyond the classroom lead to careers and graduate studies in creative writing, education, business, law, communications, journalism, and other fields.

Examples of internships include:

The Beverly Citizen
North Shore Music Theater
Random House, Inc.
Anchorage North, Group Home for Girls
WXRV The River 92.5 FM
Ocean Alliance
Massachusetts Audubon North Shore Advocacy
Beverly High School
The Boston Celtics
Rockport Publishing
Project Adventure

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the English program, students will:

  • Write expository essays that are polished and that advance coherent, well-reasoned arguments.
  • Use literary theories, terms, and approaches, and properly cite textual evidence, when analyzing literary texts.
  • Demonstrate foundational knowledge of American, British, and World Literatures.
  • Produce a substantial work of scholarship using primary and secondary sources.
  • Demonstrate the critical inquiry and analytical skills needed to engage constructively in intellectual discourse within the discipline.
  • Make connections between their major and professional opportunities through internships.
 
 


English Major/Creative Writing Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125


Freshman - Credits: 32-33


  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3-4)
  • Foreign Language  (Cr: 6)
  • English Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Electives   (Cr: 6)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Creative Writing Electives  (Cr: 6)  
    • One course must be at the 200-level; one course must be at the 300-level.
  • Elective  (Cr: 3)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Creative Writing Electives  (Cr: 12)
    • Two courses must be at 200-level; two courses must be at the 300-level.
  • English Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Literature Electives  (Cr: 6)
    • One course must be at the 300-level.
  • Multicultural Literature Elective  (Cr: 3)

Senior - Credits: 30


  • General Education Electives   (Cr: 12)
    • Two courses must be above the 100 level.

Multicultural Literature Electives


Students choose one of the following multicultural literature-based courses.

Learning Outcomes


In addition to fulfilling the outcomes of the English program, students completing the creative writing concentration will:

  • Create work that possesses a distinctive authorial voice, achieved through language and imagery and/or original exploration of topic or theme.
  • Experiment and take risks in a variety of forms (e.g. poetry, short fiction, creative non-fiction, plays and screenplays).
  • Produce an original body of work such as a collection of short stories or poems, a novella or a screenplay.
  


English Major/Literature and Language Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits: 125


Freshman - Credits: 32-33


  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3-4)
  • American Literature Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Writing and Rhetoric Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Foreign Language  (Cr: 6)
  • Elective  (Cr: 3)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • British Literature Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Multicultural Literature Elective   (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Writing and Rhetoric Elective  (Cr: 3)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • English Elective  (Cr: 6)
  • Elective (Cr: 9)
  • Multicultural Literature Elective   (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)

Senior - Credits: 30


  • General Education Electives   (Cr: 12)
    (two courses must be above the 100 level)

English Major (Literature and Language) Elective Courses


At least two of the eight courses used to fulfill the requirements below must be at or above the 300 level.

English Electives


Students may take any two other ENG courses (literature, professional writing, or creative writing based) to fulfill the requirement, provided they are not also used to fulfill other major requirements or the General Education requirements.

  


English Major/Secondary Education Teacher Licensure Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)


English majors may pursue Massachusetts state licensure by adding the secondary education concentration. In doing so, they can become licensed in the state of Massachusetts to teach grades 5-12. Students in the secondary education concentration complete freshman and sophomore internships in a range of school settings, followed by a junior year pre-practicum and senior year full-practicum experience. Upon graduation, Endicott education students have completed all of the requirements necessary to apply for an initial license in the state of Massachusetts and are eligible to pursue licensure in many other states.

The secondary education concentration consists of seven courses plus a full-semester practicum. It has been approved by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. For more information see the School of Education’s Secondary Education Teacher Licensure section of the Catalog.

Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 127-128


Freshman - Credits: 32-33


  • Foreign Language  (Cr: 6)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3-4)
  • American Literature Elective  (Cr: 3)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • British Literature Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)

Junior - Credits: 32


  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • World Literature Elective  (Cr: 3)

Senior - Credits: 31


  • General Education Electives  (Cr: 12)
    (two must be at above the 100 level)
  


Creative Writing Minor


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits.


English Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

Additional courses:


Five English courses, three of which must be at the 300 level or above.  (Cr. 15)

  


Professional Writing Minor


Program Requirements


 Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

 

Gender Studies

 


Gender Studies Minor


 

History

The study of history enables students to better understand contemporary issues and problems by examining their root causes. Through their coursework, students come to understand the dynamics of political and social change - the factors, processes, and contingencies that combine to create change over time - and learn about the distinct and intersecting histories of groups in the United States and abroad, as differentiated by race, gender, ethnicity, class, religion, sexuality, and culture. History courses offer opportunities for students to hone their communication and critical thinking skills - their ability to weigh evidence, identify and assess competing interpretations of events, and develop and sustain arguments. Endicott’s History Guild meets periodically to plan outings and events that celebrate history’s importance to many areas of life.

The major offers a flexible program of study, which provides foundational coverage of the field while allowing students to personalize their program through electives and internships. The major prepares students for professional positions and/or graduate study in a range of fields including but not limited to history, American studies, education, law, government, journalism, publishing, museums, and archives.

Examples of internships include:
     AFL-CIO
     Freedom Trail, Inc.
     Government offices
     John F. Kennedy Library and Museum
     Massachusetts Historical Society
     Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism
     Massachusetts State House
     Massachusetts State Archives
     National Heritage Museum
     Peabody Essex Museum
     Public and private schools

 


History Major (Bachelor of Arts)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125-126


History majors may not use HST courses to satisfy the General Education requirements, except for the World Cultures thematic category. A HST course taken to satisfy the World Cultures thematic category cannot also count towards completing a history elective.

Freshman - Credits: 32-33


  • Foreign Languages  (Cr: 6)
  • History Survey Sequence   (Cr: 6)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3-4)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr:3)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • U.S. History Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • World History Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Electives    (Cr: 6)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • Diverse Perspectives Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Electives   (Cr: 9)
    (one must be above the 100 level)
  • History Electives    (Cr: 9)
    (two must be above the 300 level)
  • Electives   (Cr: 6)

Senior - Credits: 30


  • Electives    (Cr: 9)
  • General Education Elective  (Cr: 3)
    (must be above the 100 level)

History Survey Sequence


History majors are required to complete a history survey sequence (United States History I and II, Western Civilization I and II, or World History I and II).

History Major Requirements


To meet the History Major’s U.S. History, World History, and Diverse Perspectives requirements, students must choose one course from each of the following lists. At least two of the three courses must be taken at the 300 or 400 level.

History Electives


To meet the History Electives requirements, students must choose four courses with the HST prefix (excluding HST 201 Contemporary Approaches to History). Students must take at least two of these courses at the 300 or 400 level.

Learning Outcomes


Upon completion of the history program, students will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary approaches to the study of history.
  • Communicate effectively in written form within the conventions of the discipline of history.
  • Interpret primary sources and use them to develop historical arguments.
  • Explain the historical roots of various contemporary issues.
  • Trace the broad contours of US history, the history of western civilization, or world history (after meeting the two-course survey sequence in one of these areas and taking other courses in the major).
  • Explain the histories of groups in the United States and abroad, as differentiated by race, gender, ethnicity, class, and culture.
  • Demonstrate the critical inquiry and analysis skills needed to engage constructively in intellectual discourse within the discipline.
  • Make connections between their major and professional opportunities through a variety of internships.
 


History Major/ Public History Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)


Public history-history presented not in classrooms, but in museums, heritage tours, civic celebrations, documentary films, podcasts, and other venues-is where the vast majority of people confront our collective past.  As history majors, public history concentrators will develop foundational knowledge of history and of the methods that today’s historians use to interpret the past.  In this concentration, however, students will also grapple with questions that animate the field of public history: why do communities and nations publically remember some historical events and not others?  How do exhibits, monuments, and heritage tours shape our understanding of history?  By examining case studies and by interning at area museums, historical societies, libraries & archives, national parks, and heritage tourism sites, public history concentrators will learn about the complicated relationship between history and memory, and the range of career paths open to history majors beyond teaching in schools, practicing law, and working in government, journalism, and other fields.   

Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125-126


History majors may not use HST courses to satisfy the General Education requirements, except for the World Cultures thematic category. A HST course taken to satisfy the World Cultures thematic category cannot also count towards completing a history elective.

Freshman - Credits: 32-33


  • Foreign Languages   (Cr: 6)
  • History Survey Sequence   (Cr: 6)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3-4)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • Global Issues General Education Requirement   (Cr:3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • U.S. History Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Public History Elective   (Cr: 6)
  • Marketing and Public Relations Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Professional Writing Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • World History Requirement   (Cr: 3)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • Aesthetic Awareness General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3) 
  • Diverse Perspectives Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Electives   (Cr: 3)
    • Must be above the 100 level. 
  • History Electives   (Cr: 6)
    • Must be above the 300 level. 
  • Marketing and Public Relations Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Public History Elective   (Cr: 3) 
  • Professional Writing Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3) 

Senior - Credits: 30


  • General Education Elective  (Cr: 9) 
    • One must be above the 100 level. 
  • History Elective  (Cr: 3)

History Survey Sequence


Students are required to complete a history survey sequence (United States History I and II, Western Civilization I and Ii, or World History I and II). 

History Major Requirements


To meet the History Major’s U.S. History, World History, and Diverse Perspectives requirements, students must choose one course from each of the following lists. At least two of the three courses must be taken at the 300 level.

History Electives


To meet the History Electives requirements, students must choose four courses with the HST prefix (excluding HST 201 Contemporary Approaches to History). Students must take at least two of these courses at the 300 or 400 level.

 


History Major/Secondary Education Teacher Licensure Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)


History majors may pursue Massachusetts state licensure by adding the secondary education concentration. In doing so, they can become licensed in the state of Massachusetts to teach grades 5-12. Students in the secondary education concentration complete freshman and sophomore internships in a range of school settings, followed by a junior year pre-practicum and senior year full-practicum experience. Upon graduation, Endicott education students have completed all of the requirements necessary to apply for an initial license in the state of Massachusetts and are eligible to pursue licensure in many other states.

The secondary education concentration consists of seven courses plus a full-semester practicum. It has been approved by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. For more information see the School of Education’s Secondary Education Teacher Licensure section of the Catalog.

Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits: 127-128


Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • History Elective   (Cr: 3)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)

Junior - Credits: 32


  • History Electives  (Cr: 6)
    (must be at the 300 level)
  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Values & Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)

Senior - Credits: 31-32


  • General Education Electives  (Cr: 9)
    • One must be above the 100 level.
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3-4)
 


History Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

Additional Courses


Five history courses, two of which must be at the 300 level or above.  (Cr. 15)

History courses include any course with an HST designation and REL 251 Religion in American Life.

 

 

Human Services

 


Human Services Minor


 

Integrated Studies

In exceptional circumstances, students enrolled in a bachelor’s degree program may petition to receive an Associate of Science in Integrated Studies.

 


Integrated Studies (Associate in Science)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 67-68


Freshman - Credits: 32-33


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • General Elective   (Cr: 6)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3-4)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)

Sophomore - Credits: 35


  • Electives   (Cr: 6)
  • General Education Electives  (Cr: 12)
    • Two must be above the 100 level
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement Cr: 3)
  • Three courses in a specific department or major   (Cr: 9)
  • Values & Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement (Cr: 3)
 

International Studies

 


International Studies Major (Bachelor of Arts)


Please note: This program is no longer accepting applications.

Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125-126


Freshman - Credits: 32-33


  • Foreign Language    (Cr: 6)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3-4)
  • Focus Area Course  (Cr: 3)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


(Recommended Study Abroad one Semester)

  • Focus Area Courses    (Cr: 9) 
  • Foreign Language    (Cr: 6)
  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Elective    (Cr :3)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • Focus Area Courses   (Cr: 6)
  • Values & Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Electives    (Cr: 15)

Senior - Credits: 30


  • General Education Electives    (Cr: 12)
    (two must be above the 100 level)

International Studies Major Requirements


To meet the international studies major’s requirements in a world affairs focus area, students take four courses in one of the following areas: international politics, governance, and security; culture and globalization; international business, economics, and development; and global health and sustainability. Students also have the option of proposing their own focus area, which must be approved by the program administrator.  Students also select two additional electives from any of the courses listed in the regional or world focus areas or additional foreign language courses.

World Focus Area Courses


Regional Focus Area Courses


To meet the international studies major’s requirements in a Regional Focus Area, students take two courses in one of the following areas: Africa; Asia; Europe; Middle East; or Latin America. This option is for students who want to develop expertise in a particular region. Courses taken abroad count toward this requirement. Students also select four additional electives from any of the courses listed in the Regional or World Focus Areas or additional foreign language courses.

Learning Outcomes


Upon completion of the international studies program, students will:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the cross-disciplinary nature of the field - e.g. the global and comparative dimensions of history, economic systems, cultural norms, art, and literature.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of international politics and geopolitics, and their role in world affairs and conflicts. 
  • Communicate effectively in written form within the conventions of the disciplines that constitute international studies.
  • Describe the language and culture of a region of the world that differs from that which students already know. 
  • Demonstrate the critical inquiry and analysis skills needed to engage constructively in intellectual discourse within the international studies discipline.
  • Make connections between their major and professional opportunities through a variety of internships.
 


International Studies Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

Required Courses


Internship / Study Abroad Experience

Students minoring in international studies are encouraged to study abroad. Those who do so may meet some of the minor’s requirements in their study abroad program.

Additional required courses


Students select three from the following courses or any course with an IST prefix:

In addition, two semesters of a foreign language and study abroad experience are highly recommended.


 

Legal Studies

 


Legal Studies Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

 

Liberal Studies

The liberal studies major is rooted in the liberal arts, and is the most versatile and individualized of Endicott’s majors as it meets the professional goals of a wide range of students. Students are exposed to reading, thinking, and writing within different disciplines as they choose courses from a range of liberal arts subjects, including History, Political Science, English, Psychology, Philosophy, Religion, Sociology, Environmental Science, and other areas. Students in the program also participate in at least two interdisciplinary seminars (LST 201), in which they examine a topic from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Academic minors are encouraged as a way for students to further develop their specific knowledge base. Students may also apply to pursue an individually designed liberal studies major.  Recent examples of such majors include “Community Development in a Global Context,” “Cognitive Studies,” “Performing Arts,” and “Social Action Advocacy”.  

Liberal Studies majors apply what they learn in the classroom to a wide range of internships, from businesses and schools to law firms and government agencies. Graduates benefit from limitless career options, and recent graduates have pursued further study at Fordham University, Oxford University, Boston College, Johns Hopkins University, and other prestigious institutions. 

Students interested in becoming licensed public school teachers complete the liberal studies major with a concentration in early childhood or elementary education. For more information, please see the School of Education section of the catalog.

Examples of Internships include:
    
     Amnesty International
     Beverly School for the Deaf
     Boys and Girls Clubs  
     Cape Ann Whale Watch
     Deloitte Services, LLP    
     Embassy of Georgia         
     Gay/ Lesbian Advocates & Defenders
     Massachusetts State House  
     Peabody Essex Museum
     Rockport Publishers  
     Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital
     WBZ News Radio

 


Liberal Studies Major (Bachelor of Arts)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125-127


Freshman - Credits: 32


  • Foreign Language  (Cr: 6)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Electives  (Cr: 6)
  • Electives   (Cr: 9)

Sophomore - Credits: 32-33


  • Global Issues General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Values & Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • English Elective    (Cr: 3)
  • International Studies Elective   (Cr: 3)
  • Philosophy or Religion Elective   (Cr: 3)
  • Science or Math Elective   (Cr: 3-4)
  • Electives   (Cr: 3)

Junior - Credits: 31-32


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3-4)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • History Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Political Science Elective   (Cr: 3)
  • Psychology or Sociology Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Electives   (Cr: 6)

Senior - Credits: 30


  • American Studies or Liberal Studies Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Elective   (Cr: 3)
  • General Education Electives  (Cr: 6)
    (must be above the 100 level)

Liberal Studies Discipline-Specific Electives


The eight discipline-designated elective requirements (English; history; international studies; political science; philosophy or religion; psychology or sociology; math or science; American studies or liberal studies) may be met by taking any course with the individual discipline’s prefix. However, at least three of the eight courses must be above the 100-level.

The American studies/liberal studies elective requirement may be met by taking any course with an AMS or LST designation or one of the following courses:

Learning Outcomes


Upon completion of the liberal studies program students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the content of liberal arts disciplines.
  • Communicate effectively in written form within the conventions of individual liberal arts disciplines or in work that is interdisciplinary.   
  • Articulate the connections and distinctions between and among liberal arts disciplines, and their contemporary relevance.
  • Demonstrate the critical inquiry and analysis skills needed to engage constructively in intellectual discourse in various disciplines.
  • Make connections between the liberal arts and professional opportunities through a variety of internships.

Interdisciplinary Seminar Requirement


Students must take a minimum of two LST 201 Interdisciplinary Seminar offerings to complete the program. These seminars are team-taught and examine topics from at least two disciplinary perspectives. The topics will change each semester.

 


Liberal Studies Major/Individually Designed Concentration (Bachelor of Arts)


The individually designed liberal studies major helps to accommodate Endicott students whose interests are not met by current Endicott majors. The program is not designed to overlap with existing majors but rather to provide qualified students with an academic program that meets their unique needs. Offering students flexibility, independence, and academic rigor, this option provides undergraduates with the opportunity to draw on the resources of the entire Endicott curriculum, across majors and disciplines.

Application Process:

Students must submit, and have approved, a detailed proposal that describes their anticipated area of study. Students must complete the College’s core curriculum, two semesters of foreign language, two LST 201 Interdisciplinary Seminars, LST 302 Methods of Inquiry in the Humanities, or PSY 240 Research Methods, and LST 489 Senior Thesis I and LST 490 Senior Thesis II.  Students may apply no earlier than the second semester of their freshman year and no later than the first semester of their junior year. The proposal for acceptance into the individually designed liberal studies major should include the following:

  1. A statement that clearly defines the focus of the student’s liberal studies major. Students should explain the rationale behind their proposal and describe connections between courses to be taken, internships to be explored, and professional goals to be pursued.
  2. A statement that explains how the proposal will allow the student to pursue a unique course of study.
  3. A tentative list of the eight courses (24 credits) that will comprise the student’s concentration. Subsequent changes are not encouraged, but if they are necessary students must get the approval of their advisor and the chair of humanities. If nine or more credits are to be taken in an existing Endicott major, the proposal will be reviewed by the chair/dean of that program.

Before applying, students should discuss their interest in the major with the faculty lead for humanities. In preparation of the proposal, consultation with advisors and/or professors is encouraged. Completed proposals should be submitted to the Dean of the School of Humanities, Communication and Social Sciences, who will review them along with the Provost, and Deans of other schools if at least three courses in the proposed concentration satisfy requirements in a program they oversee. Students will be notified in writing of their acceptance into the program. The title of the individually designed major will appear on the transcript upon degree completion.

 

Liberal Studies/Education - Go to the School of Education below

See Liberal Studies / Education: Early Childhood Education Teacher Licensure under the School of Education.

See Liberal Studies / Education: Elementary Education Teacher Licensure under the School of Education.

See Liberal Studies / Education: Secondary Education Teacher Licensure under the School of Education, Biology/Biotechnology, Environmental Science, English, History, Mathematics, or Fine Arts.

 


Peace and Conflict Studies Minor


Marketing Communication/Advertising

In the marketing communication/advertising major, students develop the critical thinking and writing skills necessary to function in this demanding field. Coursework includes a focus on traditional and social media marketing, public relations and client development. Students are given a basic understanding of the industry which prepares them to succeed as they move into their three-week and semester-long internships.

 


Marketing Communication/Advertising Major (Bachelor of Science)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125


Freshman - Credits: 32


  • Global Issues General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr:3)
  • Elective  (Cr: 3)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr:3)
  • Elective   (Cr: 3)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • General Education Electives (Cr: 12)  (two must be above the 100 level)
  • Elective   (Cr: 3)

Learning Outcomes


Upon completion of the marketing communication/advertising program, students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of how marketing communication works and persuades.
  • Explain the ways in which marketing communication is central to our cultural language.
  • Plan, implement, and evaluate marketing communication programs.
  • Analyze ethical issues related to marketing communication.
  • Communicate effectively in written form within the conventions of the communication discipline.
  • Demonstrate the critical inquiry and analysis skills needed to engage constructively in intellectual discourse within the discipline. 
  • Demonstrate integrated learning skills by making connections between classroom learning and professional life in the marketing communication discipline.
 

Philosophy

 


Philosophy Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows, at least two of which must be at the 300 level or above:

 

Political Science

The political science major prepares students to be active, informed citizens in our increasingly complex and interdependent world. By studying American and international politics, comparative governments, law, and political theory, students are able to understand and evaluate various political systems and ideologies. Political science majors examine the foundations of local, state, national, and international politics while analyzing world events to explore the relationship between theory and practice. As they investigate the multiple forces - economic, geographic, cultural, philosophical, and historical - that affect the success of political systems, they develop tools for improving governance and diplomacy at home and abroad. Through opportunities on and off campus, they participate in political processes and promote awareness of some of the most pressing issues facing their country and the world.

Political science majors apply what they learn through countless opportunities, gaining practical knowledge while forging valuable relationships with professionals in the field. Depending on their interests, students may choose to intern in government offices, law firms, nongovernmental organizations, embassies, consulting and lobbying firms, or other politically relevant settings. Graduates emerge with a profound knowledge of politics and enhanced critical thinking, speaking, analytical, and writing skills that aid them in launching significant careers and ensure success in law schools, graduate programs, or any number of important fields in our evolving global society.

Possible careers include:

Activism and advocacy
Campaign management
Financial consulting
Foreign service
Government/law
Immigration services
Journalism
Labor relations
Lobbying
Political commentary
Public policy
Urban planning

 


Political Science Major (Bachelor of Science)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125-126


Freshman - Credits: 32


  • Foreign Language  (Cr: 6)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Electives   (Cr: 6)

Sophomore - Credits: 32-33


  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr. 3)
  • Science & Technology General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3-4)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Political Science Elective  (Cr: 6)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Political Science Elective  (Cr: 15)
  • General Education Electives   (Cr: 6)
  • Electives  (Cr: 3)

Senior - Credits: 30


  • Elective  (Cr: 6)
  • General Education Electives  (Cr: 6)
    (must be above the 100 level)

Political Science Electives


Students must choose 7 courses from the following lists; at least 3 of the 7 must have a POL designation. 
Students may select a specific focus area in choosing their electives.

Learning Outcomes


Upon completion of the political science program, students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of content and application in the four core areas of political science: American government and politics, political theory, comparative government, and international relations.
  • Actively engage in political action and processes at any level on and off campus through field research, internships, service programs, and club activities.
  • Communicate effectively in written form within the conventions of the political science discipline.
  • Demonstrate the critical inquiry and analysis skills needed to engage constructively in academic discourse within the political science discipline.
 


Political Science Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

Required Courses (3 credits)


Additional Courses (15 Credits)


Students select five courses from the following, two of which must be at the 300 level or above. 

  • POL XXX (Any POL Course) (Cr: 3) 
 

Psychology

The psychology curriculum is designed to provide students with an understanding of the theory and research within the four general domains of psychology: learning and cognition; individual differences, personality and social processes; biological bases of behavior; and developmental changes across the lifespan. Students learn to understand and apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation. They come to understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, and organizational issues; and they learn to weigh evidence, tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect other values that are the underpinnings of psychology as a discipline. Additionally, they will recognize, understand, and respect the complexity of socio-cultural and international diversity.

Psychology majors apply this knowledge in a wide range of professional fields through three required internships that are completed in settings such as mental health clinics, hospitals, community residential programs, schools, and human resource departments. The program’s emphasis is on the scientific study of individual and collective behavior, the social and cultural basis of behavior, and the analysis and treatment of behavior problems and disorders makes it ideal for students to move into any career associated with psychology, along with numerous careers outside of the field. Additionally, students will be fully prepared to continue their education in graduate schools within psychology, education, law, or social work.

Examples of Internships include:

         
Attorney General’s Office, Providence
          Bay Ridge Hospital
          Beverly Children’s Learning Center
          Beverly High School Guidance Department
          Butler Hospital, Occupational Therapy 
          Center for Addictive Behaviors
          Childhelp USA
          Maine General Medical Hospital
          Massachusetts General Hospital

 


Psychology Major (Bachelor of Science)


Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125-126


Freshman - Credits: 32-33


  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement   (Cr. 3-4)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Electives   (Cr: 6)

Sophomore - Credits: 32


  • Global Issues General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Electives    (Cr: 9)

Junior - Credits: 31


  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Electives    (Cr: 6)
  • General Education Elective    (Cr: 6)
  • Psychology Electives    (Cr: 6)
    • Must be at the 300 level.
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3) 

Senior - Credits: 30


  • General Education Electives    (Cr: 6)
    • Must be at above the 100 level.
  • Psychology Elective    (Cr: 3)
    • Must be above the 300 level. 

Psychology Electives


Psychology electives are any course with a PSY designation at the 300 level or above and SM 306 Psychology of Sport.

Learning Outcomes


Upon completion of the psychology program, students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology.
  • Apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis, and interpretation.
  • Apply basic psychological concepts and principles in real world settings.
  • Communicate effectively in written form within the conventions of the psychology discipline.
  • Demonstrate the critical inquiry and analysis skills needed to engage constructively in academic discourse within the psychology discipline.
 


Psychology Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits.

Required course


Additional courses


Five psychology courses, three of which must be at the 300 level or above.

 

Religion

 


Religious Studies Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

Additional Courses


 Students select one from the following courses:.

Students select three from the following courses:


These can include any REL course or from the following list:

 

Sociology

 


Sociology Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits as follows:

 

Spanish

 


Spanish Minor


Program Requirements


Students are required to take a minimum of 18 credits.

Six Spanish courses, two of which must be at the 300 level or above.