Oct 18, 2021  
2021-2022 Endicott College Academic Catalog 
  
2021-2022 Endicott College Academic Catalog

Academic Policies & Information


Click on a link to be taken to the entry below.

 

 

Academic Honors and Awards

To recognize outstanding academic achievement, Endicott offers a number of awards and honors:

Endicott Scholars: Traditional Undergraduate Honors Program

The Endicott Scholars program is an interdisciplinary honors curriculum that seeks to give Endicott’s most ambitious students an opportunity to study topics in depth and from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The program gives students the opportunity to: develop the habit of intellectual curiosity; serve as models of intellectual seriousness and courage; understand the concepts of “culture” and “theory” from a variety of academic perspectives; identify ways of thinking and knowing within academic and professional disciplines; comprehend challenging readings in primary and secondary sources; write academic papers that are intellectually sound and stylistically proficient; and assume leadership roles in and out of class.

Endicott Scholars participate in small, academically challenging and engaging seminars led by Endicott’s most dynamic professors. Students accepted to the program as freshmen take ENG 111 Critical Reading and Writing I in the fall and HON 100 Honors Seminar I in the fall or spring instead of ENG 112 Critical Reading and Writing II. All scholars who enter the program as freshman are also required to take 3 sections of HON350 Honors Seminars prior to their senior year.

Students who are accepted to the Endicott Scholars program as sophomores are required to take a one semester foundation course, HON 200 Honors Seminar II, in the fall of their sophomore year. All scholars who enter the program as sophomores are also required to take 2 sections of HON350 Honors Seminars prior to their senior year.  

Seminar topics change each semester and can include: History and Culture of Food, Banned Books, Race in American Society and Culture, Tibet, The Culture of Heroism, Media Literacy, Exploring Swedish Media and Culture, Modern Latin American Culture, Suburbia, Inside your Mind, Irony, and the National Self: In Search of Identity in Russia and Eastern Europe. Endicott Scholars are also eligible to take honors seminar courses abroad at select institutions: The American College of Greece in Athens, The Umbra Institute in Perugia, and Charles University in Prague.

Through participation in honors seminars, and attending activities and events, Endicott Scholars create a community of academic leaders on the Endicott campus.  Endicott Scholars have traveled to New York City, seen popular musicals at the Boston Opera House, eaten at local ethnic restaurants, and attended engaging guest lectures at Endicott. A senior scholars recognition dinner celebrates students who graduate from the program. Graduating scholars are featured, give speeches, and receive stoles to wear at Commencement.

Endicott Scholars Admission Standards

Admission to the Endicott Scholars program is highly selective and competitive. There are two opportunities to join the program, and application is by invitation only. Incoming freshmen are invited to join the program based on GPA, SAT scores (if submitted), class rank, honors coursework completed in high school, and AP credit attempted or achieved. Freshmen who are placed on the Dean’s List for high academic achievement after their fall semester are invited to apply for admittance to the program as sophomores. All Endicott Scholars must maintain a 3.5 grade point average each semester throughout their Endicott careers, with one semester of probation allowed. Scholarship support is provided to students who are accepted into the program.

Honor Societies 

Alpha Phi Sigma Honor Society
This is a national honor society for students majoring or minoring in criminal justice who have completed at least four courses in criminal justice, rank in the top 35% of their class, maintain a 3.2 cumulative grade point average and a 3.2 grade point average in Criminal Justice courses.

Eta Sigma Delta Honor Society
This is an international honor society for junior and senior hospitality students who maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and a 3.25 grade point average in hospitality courses.

Iota Gamma Chi Honor Society
This honor society, for liberal studies majors, was founded in 2010 by a group of Endicott students in order to recognize the accomplishments of those majoring in liberal studies. Iota Gamma Chi embraces the principles of thought and inquiry that are the benchmarks of the liberal studies major. Members must have earned a minimum of 15 credits and maintain a GPA of 3.2 or higher.

Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society
This international honor society is for junior and senior education students who maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and are in the upper fifth of their class.

Lambda Pi Eta Honor Society
This is a national honor society for communication students who maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and a 3.25 grade point average in communication courses.

Mortar Board Honor Society
This is an undergraduate honor society for seniors, which recognizes exemplary students across all disciplines for scholarship, leadership, and community service. Mortar Board members are selected during their junior year based on a high grade point average and the recommendations of student leaders and members of the faculty. Active during their senior year, they create a legacy through a community service project for the Endicott campus.

Phi Alpha Theta Honor Society
This is a national honor society for history students who maintain a GPA of 3.1 in history and a GPA of 3.0 or better overall. Eligible candidates must also be in the top 35% of their class.

Phi Epsilon Kappa Honor Society
This is a national professional honors society for students pursuing careers in physical education, health, recreation, dance, human performance, exercise science, sport medicine (athletic training), and sport management. Students are required to rank in the top 30% of their SSFS major as well as maintain a 3.5 GPA in their major and college wide courses.

Phi Sigma Honor Society
This national honor society is for juniors and seniors majoring in the biological sciences who are devoted to the promotion of student research and academic excellence.  Members are in the top 35% of their class, and maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0.  The National Office is currently located at Endicott College.

Pi Sigma Alpha Honor Society
This national honor society is for political science majors who have completed at least half of the credits required for the baccalaureate degree, ten credit hours in political science with an average grade of “B” or higher, and rank in the top third of their class.

Psi Chi Honor Society
This is a national honor society for psychology majors who have completed three semesters of study including nine credit hours of psychology, rank in the top 35% of their class, and maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0.

Sigma Beta Delta Honor Society
This national society honors outstanding students of business. Members have completed one half of their degree programs while maintaining a cumulative grade point average in the top 20 percent of their class.

Sigma Iota Rho Honor Society
This international honor society is for junior and senior international studies majors who maintain a 3.2 cumulative grade point average and a 3.3 grade point average in their international studies courses.

Sigma Tau Delta
This is an international honor society for English majors and minors who have a minimum of a 3.0 GPA in English and in general scholarship, rank in the highest 35% of their class, and have completed at least three semesters of college coursework.

Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society
This is an international honor society for nursing students at the undergraduate and graduate level, community nurse leaders, alumni, and faculty. Sigma Theta Tau’s vision is to use knowledge, scholarship, service, and learning to improve the health of the world’s people.

Sigma Xi Honor Society
This international research society supports outstanding endeavors in all areas of science and engineering. With more that 60,000 members in over 100 countries. Sigma Xi sponsors projects and collaborations around the world through grant awards, publications, and program development. Endicott is a member of the North Shore Chapter, honoring students and faculty engaged in scientific research.

Academic Honors for Undergraduate Students

Academic Awards
Academic awards are given out annually to graduating students in a variety of categories including academic excellence and community engagement. Awards are announced at the end of the spring semester prior to Commencement.

Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, Summa Cum Laude
Recognition is given at Commencement to each student who has earned a superior record of academic achievement at Endicott. These designations of distinction are placed on the student’s degree. Summa Cum Laude: a cumulative grade point average of 3.9 - 4.0; Magna Cum Laude: a cumulative grade point average of 3.7 - 3.89; Cum Laude: a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 - 3.69.

Dean’s List
At the close of each semester, each student who attains an average of 3.5 or above, with no grade below a “C,” no withdrawal or INC grades, and who is enrolled in a minimum of 12 credits, is placed on the Dean’s List.

Academic Integrity

Endicott College Academic Integrity Statement

Endicott College is committed to nurturing the development and growth of intellectual reasoning, academic and professional values, individual ethics, and social responsibility amongst all students, both graduate and undergraduate. The College provides academically rigorous programs founded upon two underlying principles: honesty and academic integrity. These principles are essential for ensuring the quality of the College’s academic programs, and the intellectual development and curiosity of students.  Therefore, academic dishonesty (in any form) seriously compromises the College’s mission to provide quality programs for all students, as well as undermines individual student credibility.

At Endicott College the demonstration of academic integrity falls into the following categories:

Mastery of material - Students (undergraduate and graduate) are responsible for the truthful representation of content mastery in all academic work, including (by not limited to) quizzes, exams, in and out-of-class assignments, collaborative work, essays, research projects, creative works, media or web-based projects, or any other academic or professional work assigned by the instructor.

Representation of sources - Students (undergraduate and graduate) are responsible for the complete, accurate, and truthful acknowledgement of the intellectual, creative, or professional property of others, including (but not limited to) word choice, sentence structure, phrases, ideas, recordings, images, media, data, or any other (re)sources deemed appropriate by the instructor.

Truthful submission of work - Students (undergraduate and graduate) are responsible for the truthful representation of any work submitted as their own scholarly, creative, and other professional work, including (but not limited to) research data and findings, essays, scholarly or creative works, media or web-based projects, internship or clinical timesheets, or any other academic or professional work assigned by the instructor.  

Categories of Academic Integrity Violations

Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy generally fall into three categories: Cheating, Plagiarism, and  Falsification. In order to assist students, faculty, and staff to understand what may constitute a violation of academic integrity, the following definitions and relevant examples have been provided below:

Cheating:  an intentional act of deception by which a person misrepresents their mastery of the subject matter or course material. Some examples of cheating include:

  • Possessing, copying, and/or sharing questions or answers to any graded assignment.

  • Presenting work done by others as one’s own (e.g. another person taking an exam for a student; submitting assignments, essays, and/or other coursework completed by another person).

  • Using notes, books, and/or other unauthorized materials in closed-book examination situations.

  • Fabricating sources or citations (e.g. a student “made up” sources for an essay assignment; see also “Falsification”).

  • Signing another person’s name as proof of attendance at an event, lecture, or other college-sanctioned activity that is required by an instructor outside of normally scheduled class time.

  • Collaborating on any assignments such as homework, take-home exams, or projects in which the instructor does not allow collaboration.

Plagiarism: an intentional or unintentional act of deception by which a person represents someone else’s words, ideas, phrases, sentence structure, data, or other intellectual property as one’s own work.  Some examples of plagiarism include:

  • Using direct quotations without quotation marks or proper citation(s).

  • Paraphrasing without proper acknowledgement of the original author and/or a lack of appropriate citations according to disciplinary conventions (e.g. MLA, APA, Chicago, ASA, AMA, etc.).

  • Paraphrasing too closely to the original source (e.g. making only minor changes to an author’s words, phrases, sentence structure; using the pattern, structure, or organization of an author’s argument or idea without proper citations).

  • Failing to cite sources for uncommon facts or knowledge.

Falsification:  an intentional act of deception by which a person uses invented information, fabricated evidence, and/or altered research findings or results as valid knowledge.  Some examples of falsification include:

  • Inventing, altering, or presenting misleading information about the substance of an internship, fieldwork, practicum, or clinical experience (e.g. doctoring internship timesheets).

  • Submitting work previously completed for another course.

  • Falsifying, altering, or presenting misleading information about the level of effort and/or participation on a group or solo assignment.

  • Falsifying, using, and/or submitting invented data, data collection, results, etc.

In addition to the categories described above, academic integrity violations may also occur in other academic contexts.

Faculty Procedures for Academic Integrity

The value of an Endicott degree is directly affected by the academic integrity of students. Violations of academic integrity are serious and degrade the value of an Endicott College education. Incidences of plagiarism, cheating, falsification (as described above), or any other violations of academic integrity in any learning environment will not be tolerated. The procedures to be followed in cases of suspected violations of the Academic Integrity Policy are described below.

1. If the faculty member suspects that a student has violated the Endicott College Academic Integrity Policy, they will complete the Academic Integrity Violation form (currently available via the intranet/future Etrieve form).  The faculty will set up to meet privately with the student within five business days from the discovery of the alleged violation. During the meeting, the faculty member will discuss the violation and possible sanctions with the student and present the evidence if applicable. Within 48 hours of the initial meeting, the student may seek advice from an individual within the academic community. If the student fails to respond to the faculty member within 48-hours of the initial faculty meeting request, the faculty’s sanction will be imposed, and the student will forfeit their right to appeal.  One of several outcomes may result:

a. Both parties agree that the alleged violation did not occur. No further action is taken.  The faculty member and the student update the outcome on the Academic Integrity Incident Report Form, which is sent to the Provost’s office, who forwards a copy to the student’s school dean for record.

b. The student admits to the integrity violation, and both parties agree on an appropriate sanction in keeping with the severity of the incident. The faculty member and the student update the Academic Integrity Incident Report Form, which is sent to the Provost’s office, who forwards a copy to the student’s school dean in which the violation occurred. If the Provost’s Office believes the incident is a potential repeated offense, the Provost will submit the case to the Academic Integrity Committee for review.

c. The student does not agree that a violation has occurred or disagrees with the sanction and decides to appeal. The faculty member and the student update the Academic Integrity Incident Report Form and the student proceeds to the appeals portion of the form, which will be submitted to the Provost’s office, who then forwards it to the Academic Integrity Committee for review. The chair of the committee contacts the faculty member and the student in writing to set up separate meeting times for each party to meet with the Academic Integrity Committee to discuss the alleged violation.

If a student does not agree that a violation has occurred or disagrees with the sanction and decides to appeal, the faculty member and the student update the Academic Integrity Incident Report Form and the student proceeds to the appeals portion of the form, which will be submitted to the Provost’s office, who then forwards it to the Academic Integrity Committee for review. The chair of the committee contacts the faculty member and the student in writing to set up separate meeting times for each party to meet with the Academic Integrity Committee to discuss the alleged violation.

An accused student has the right to appeal any finding and/or sanction.

  • The student must submit an appeal form and any supporting documentation through the (Academic Integrity Violation form via the Intranet/future Etrieve system) within five (5) business days of the decision.

  • The Provost’s Office will receive the appeal, review and forward to the Academic Integrity Committee.

  • The Academic Integrity Committee chair will set up meetings with the faculty and student with the Academic Integrity Committee to discuss the alleged violation and appeal.

  • The Academic Integrity Committee makes a recommendation to reject or uphold the student’s appeal and forwards its decision in writing, along with sanction recommendations in the case of a rejection, to the Provost’s Office.

  • The Provost’s office takes the Committee’s recommendations under advisement and makes the final decision regarding the student’s appeal.

  • If the Provost’s office upholds the appeal, no sanctions are imposed.

  • In the case of a rejected appeal, the Provost’s office makes a final decision regarding sanctions in consultation with the faculty member.

  • In the case of a repeated offense, the Provost’s office recommended sanctions may include dismissal from the College.

  • In the case of a potential dismissal, the final decision rests with the Provost’s office.

  •  A completed copy of the Appeal Form and Academic Integrity Incident Report Form is kept for record in the Provost’s office and a copy is sent to the dean of the school in which the violation occurred.

Guidance For Completion of the Academic Integrity Form

When an alleged violation of academic integrity occurs, the initial sanction given to a student is at the discretion of the instructor. All records of infractions pertaining to academic integrity will be maintained by the Provost’s Office, and additional sanctions may be given to a student if they have previously been found in violation of academic integrity policies.  A list of suggested or possible sanctions pertaining to the most common academic integrity violations is available to faculty by the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee.  These examples are intended as a reference for instructors, and are not intended to supersede any sanction originally assigned by the instructor, but merely act as a guide for faculty based upon similar scenarios at other colleges and universities.

The faculty member will report the incident through the Academic Integrity Violation Report (AIVR) with supporting documentation and the sanction imposed to the Provost’s Office, which tracks violations.    

Second and Subsequent Violations

Should the Provost’s Office determine the student in question has on file any previous violations of academic integrity, the office will refer the matter to the Academic Integrity Committee. The committee will then convene. The purpose of this hearing is not to reconsider the student’s violation, but to recommend additional sanctions for consideration by the Provost’s office. Examples of additional sanctions might include, but are not limited to:

  • Disciplinary and/or academic warning from the College.

  • Academic probation for a semester or the academic year.

  • Involuntary withdrawal from the College for a semester.

  • Dismissal or expulsion from the College.

Consequently, additional sanctions may not be imposed if the second or subsequent violations are proven to be unintentional or non-egregious and will be determined on a case-by-case basis. The Provost’s office will have the final decision on additional sanctions imposed.

Academic Probation and Dismissal

A student not reaching the required minimum cumulative GPA (grade point average - see explanation of grade point average and Satisfactory Academic Progress) will be placed on academic probation. This means that his or her record will be reviewed by an Academic Review Committee, which may make recommendations that would, if followed, improve the student’s academic status. The committee may also recommend dismissal.

Academic Overload Policy

Undergraduate Traditional Program

A full-time student is defined as any student taking 12 or more credits during a semester.  Students normally take five courses per semester.  As long as a student has a GPA of 2.0 or higher, he or she may take an additional course for up to 18 credit hours at no additional cost.  Any credits in excess of 18 per semester will be charged as an academic overload on a per credit basis.  No exceptions will be made to the 2.0 GPA requirement.

Academic Residency for Active-Duty Military Personnel

Endicott College limits academic residency for active-duty military service members to no more than twenty five percent of the degree requirements for all degrees. Academic residency can be completed at any time while active-duty military service members are enrolled. Reservist and National Guardsman on active-duty are covered in the same manner.

Add and Drop/Withdrawals/Refunds

Graduate Programs, Professional Studies Programs

Withdrawal from a course must be requested officially in writing and delivered to the Office of the Registrar, either in person or via Endicott email at registrar@endicott.edu. Failure to withdraw officially from a course once it has commenced will result in a grade of “F” on the college transcript.

Semester-long undergraduate courses comply with the add/drop dates and policies within Endicott College’s traditional academic calendar (September-December, end of January-May). The academic calendar is available online at www.endicott.edu/Undergrad/Academic-Calendar.aspx.

Students in semester-long graduate or doctoral courses may enroll in courses within the first seven days of the start of a course.

Students in professional studies undergraduate or graduate courses may enroll in a course up to and including the first day of the course.

Students in semester-long graduate and doctoral courses and students in accelerated undergraduate and graduate courses may drop a course within seven days of the start of the course.

Students in semester-long graduate and doctoral courses, professional studies undergraduate or graduate courses must withdraw within seven days prior to the last day of the class to receive a W on their College transcript. The grade is not averaged in the GPA. Students who withdraw within the last seven days of a course receive a WX  (withdrawn failed) on their College transcript. A “WX” is averaged into the GPA as an “F.” Failure to withdraw will result in an “F” on their College transcript.

Refunds are permitted according to the date the withdrawal request is received:

    Within the first week of class (seventh day of the course): 100%
    Within the second week (14th day of the course): 50%
    Third week or after: No refunds

Please note: Application and registration fees are NOT refundable.

Endicott College complies with the refund policies as outlined in the Higher Education Amendments of 1998. First-time students who receive Title IV assistance should contact the Financial Aid Office to obtain the Title IV refund policy or review in the college Catalog.

Undergraduate Traditional Program

If a student drops a class during the add/drop period (as published on the Academic Calendar), no notation is made on his/her permanent record. If a student withdraws from a course before the tenth week of the semester, a grade of “W” (withdrawn) is entered on the permanent record. The grade is not averaged in the GPA, but it is counted in the number of credits attempted. If a student withdraws after the tenth week, a grade of “WX” (withdrawn failed) is entered. A “WX” is averaged into the GPA as an “F.”

Refunds are permitted according to the date the withdrawal request is received:

Students who officially withdraw from Endicott College may be granted refund of tuition, room, and board according to the refund schedule below unless the withdrawal is due to active military service. Students withdrawing due to active military service will be eligible for a refund of 100% of tuition, room, and board. Students who are dismissed due to disciplinary action will not be entitled to any refund.

Prior to check in, 100% of tuition, room, and board fees are refunded minus the non-refundable deposit.

Within the first week of class: 80
Within the second week: 60%
Within the third week: 40%
Within the fourth week: 20%
Fifth week and after: No refund

Leave of Absence
A student may take one or two semester leave of absence by notifying the Division of Academic Success at success@endicott.edu or by calling (978)232-2290. If the leave of absence is taken during the semester, semester grades of “W”  will be issued.  “W” grades will not affect the GPA; but credits attempted may impact overall academic standing. The program and degree requirements under which that student first matriculated will not be affected. Students must complete an exit interview and receive the signatures of their respective school dean, Division of Academic Success, the bursar, the director of financial aid, the residence director (if a resident student), the athletic director (if an athlete), the dean of undergraduate international education (if an international student), academic technology (if participating in the laptop program), and the registrar for official processing. To return from a leave of absence, contact the Division of Academic Success. Please note that a leave of absence is treated the same as a withdrawal from a financial and financial aid perspective. For any Service members and reservists who are temporarily unable to attend class or must suspend their studies due to service requirements, please contact Academic Success for accommodations.

Readmission/Returning from Leave of Absence
A student who withdrew from Endicott College in good standing must contact the Division of Academic Success at success@endicott.edu or by calling (978)232-2290 to be reinstated to the College. A student returning from an approved leave of absence must contact the Division for Academic Success. For any Service members and reservists who were temporarily unable to attend class or suspended their studies due to service requirements, please contact Academic Success for accommodations.

Withdrawal from the College
Forms for official withdrawal from the College may be obtained from the Division of Academic Success at success@endicott.edu or by calling (978)232-2290. The Division  will assist in completing the process, including the review of alternatives available to the student and completion of an exit interview. Students must receive the signatures of their respective school dean, the Division of Academic Success, the bursar, the dean of financial aid, the residence director (if a resident student), the dean of international programs (if an international student), the athletic director (if an athlete), academic technology (if participating in the laptop program) and the registrar for official processing.

Administrative Withdrawal
Administrative withdrawal from the College may result for the following reasons:

1. Failure to pay required fees.

2. When a student is absent from classes for more than three weeks.

3. If a student fails to return for a subsequent semester without appropriate notifications.

4. If the student demonstrates that they are unable to adequately participate in the academic environment.

5. If a student presents a threat to others or interferes with the responsibility of the College to provide a safe environment for the community.

An administrative withdrawal constitutes a complete withdrawal from all courses, and a grade of “W” is recorded on the academic transcript. Students who officially withdraw may be granted a refund of tuition, room, and board according to the published policies of the College. Students who are dismissed due to disciplinary action will not be entitled to any refund. A formal request for readmission must be submitted to the Provost Office.

Advising

Advising is one component of the Endicott experience that supports the student-centered approach of the College mission in which students and advisors develop a relationship that often evolves into mentorship. Endicott, as a small college, believes in the importance of offering a personal connection through which the advisors can provide valuable information about the College experience, from course selection and internship placement to career paths and co-curricular opportunities. At Endicott, each student is assigned an advisor and in addition has access to the centralized supplemental Advising Services Center (ASC) located in the Diane M. Halle Library.

The student plays an important role in creating and building the advising relationship. In beginning the path towards independent decision making, students are expected to be equal partners in making their academic choices. Students are encouraged to visit their advisors frequently and to take advantage of office hours and other opportunities to meet, both formally and informally, with their academic advisors. Students are also advised to read the Endicott College Academic Catalog and to become familiar with the requirements of their majors and of the Endicott College core curriculum. Lastly, they are encouraged to talk with their advisors about the choices they are making, both in and out of the classroom. Every student can benefit from taking advantage of the small-college atmosphere that makes personal advising relationships possible.

Attendance
Class attendance is considered essential to attain academic objectives at Endicott College. Therefore, the College encourages all students to attend all classes. Individual faculty members may establish attendance standards in their course syllabi, which become criteria for assessment and evaluation. 

The College recognizes special needs arising from the subject matter and methodology of specific courses. At the first class of each semester, the faculty member will announce to students any special attendance or engagement  requirements for that course. Students who do not comply with attendance requirements (in any course delivery format) jeopardize their academic standing in the class and risk failure in and potential dismissal from the course with a grade of WX (withdrawal failing). 

In the case of illness or other extenuating life circumstances that result in absences totaling 20% of the semester class meetings or more, the student will be withdrawn from the course with a grade of W. If the absences impact all of the courses in which the student is enrolled, the student will be withdrawn from the College with grades of W in all classes.

Change in Program of Study

If students enrolled at Endicott wish to change the program of study they are pursuing, add or change a minor, they must complete a Change of Major/Concentration form available on Etrieve.

Class Designation

The following numbers of earned credits determine the student’s class designation.

Freshman        0 - 29.9

Sophomore     30 - 59.9

Junior              60 - 89.9

Senior              90 and up

Course Cancellation Policy

Endicott College strongly encourages students to register early to minimize the cancellation of courses due to insufficient enrollment. In the event a course is cancelled, every effort will be made to contact the student via telephone or email to assist in the selection of another course. For students paying tuition by credit, when courses are cancelled by the College, refunds include 100% tuition and fees. 

Course Evaluations

The College appreciates students’ input and feedback on course offerings and considers such feedback an important aspect of continually improving the curriculum. In addition, course evaluations provide an opportunity for the faculty member to review past performance and to set new goals in their teaching.

Course evaluations may be distributed to students toward the end of each class. A link to the evaluation will automatically appear in the Canvas course shell; this link is also emailed to students’ Endicott Endicott email address. Faculty are encouraged to remind students to complete the evaluations. Students’ willingness to complete the course evaluation form at the conclusion of each course and their candid remarks regarding the instructor, the course, and the College’s role in their educational program is strongly encouraged.

Course Expectations

For Fall/Spring semester-long courses that meet the standard 3-day or 2-day meeting patterns:
A three credit course means that in addition to the scheduled meeting times, students are expected to do at least 6 hours of course-related work outside of class each week during the semester. This includes time spent completing assigned readings, participating in lab sessions, studying for test and examinations, preparing written assignments, and other course-related task.

For Fall/Spring semester-long courses with non-standard meeting times (i.e. not the standard 3-day or 2-day meeting patterns):
A three credit course means that students are expected to do at least nine hours of course-related work or activities each week during the semester. This includes scheduled class meeting times, as well as time spent completing assigned readings, studying for tests and examinations, preparing written assignments, and other course-related tasks.

For Accelerated face-to-face courses:
A three credit course means that in addition to the scheduled meeting times, students are expected to do at least 18.5 hours of course-related work each week of the 6-week term. This includes work done completing assigned readings, studying for test and examinations, preparing written assignments, and other course-related tasks.

For Accelerated fully online courses:
A three credit course means that students are expected to do at least 22.5 hours of course-related work each week of the 6-week term. This includes work done completing assigned readings, studying for test and examinations, preparing written assignments, and other course-related tasks.

For Winter session face-to-face courses:
A three credit course means that in addition to the scheduled meeting times, students are expected to do at least 37 hours of course-related work outside of class each week during the three-week Winter session. This includes work done completing assigned readings, studying for test and examinations, preparing written assignments, and other course-related tasks.

For Winter session fully online courses:
A three credit course means that in addition to the scheduled meeting times, students are expected to do at least 45 hours of course-related work outside of class each week during the three-week winter session. This includes work done completing assigned readings, studying for test and examinations, preparing written assignments, and other course-related tasks.

Credit Hour Policy

Institution-wide definitions and policies

Endicott College uses the credit hour as the measure of academic currency.
Credit hour definition: in general, a credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement.
Semester definition: A standard semester is approximately 15 weeks.

Formulas

  • A. In lecture courses, one semester hour of credit equals one hour of class instruction and at least two hours of work outside class for 15 weeks.
  • B. A three-credit course consists of 45 contact hours and 90 hours of outside work. The Mass DOE has indicated that a 50-minute class is equivalent to an hour of instruction.
  • C. Other academic activities (e.g. labs, studio, hybrid, or online): one credit hour is assigned to three hours of student work per week throughout one semester of approximately 15 weeks in length, or approximately 45 hours of work.   

Dismissal/Appeal Policy

If there were extenuating circumstances that led to the student’s dismissal, the student may appeal the dismissal in writing to the Provost by the deadline stated in the dismissal letter. When a student is dismissed, any coursework in progress, including winter or summer session courses and internships, will not be considered in determining the student’s academic status.

Disruptive Classroom Behavior

The faculty may dismiss a student from class who persists in behavior that disrupts or adversely affects the safety,  learning and teaching process in the classroom.  Faculty should make clear the expectations for classroom conduct, and students must understand that it is their responsibility to behave accordingly as behavior that undermines favorable conditions for teaching and learning, will not be tolerated. Depending on the severity of the disruptive behavior, the faculty may enlist the immediate assistance of Public Safety in removing the student from the class.

Disciplinary sanctions for disruptive classroom behavior may range from a one-time dismissal from a class session to dismissal from the course for the semester or from the College in extreme circumstances. Disruptive classroom behavior issues shall be handled as set forth below, or may, at the discretion of the Provost, based on the nature and severity of the alleged conduct, be directed to the school administration to be resolved pursuant to the Endicott College Student Code of Conduct.

The faculty member will meet with the student to resolve the matter informally when possible, However, in any situation that cannot be immediately resolved with the student, the faculty member may impose an appropriate sanction and submit the Classroom Conduct Incident Report Form within 24 hours of the incident to the student’s chair/dean who will notify the student of the faculty’s decision. The student will meet with the chair/dean to complete the student portion of the Classroom Conduct Incident Report Form, indicating that (1) he/she admits to the behavior and accepts the sanction or (2) that he/she denies the behavior and/or does not accept the sanction and wishes to appeal the faculty’s decision.  In the case of an appeal, the chair/dean will submit the form to the provost, who will refer the case to the Academic Integrity Committee for review.

The Committee will consult with both the faculty and the student to investigate the matter, review the evidence, and reach a determination regarding the allegation of disruptive behavior.  The Committee will also determine whether the faculty member’s proposed sanction is appropriate and fair and may revoke, alter or uphold the faculty member’s sanction.  The student, faculty member, and provost will be notified in writing of the outcome of the Committee’s investigation and determination.

Final Residency at Endicott

A minimum of 30 credits must be earned at Endicott College, and 24 of the last 30 credits toward an undergraduate degree must be earned at Endicott College. The last 24 undergraduate residency credits are exclusive of credit earned through the Prior Learning Assessment (PLA).

Financial Aid Policy

Financial Aid is available for eligible students who are matriculated in a program.In order to continue to receive federal, state, or college funds, a student must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress as defined above. Whenever a student falls below the minimum standard for satisfactory academic progress in any given semester, he or she will receive a financial aid warning. If the student fails to achieve satisfactory academic progress in the subsequent semester, he or she will be placed on academic probation and lose financial aid. It should be noted, however, that if the student believes that the failure to remove himself or herself from probation was caused by substantial extenuating circumstances, he or she has the right to appeal to the Financial Aid Committee to extend financial aid for one additional semester.  Visit endicott.edu/financialaid for more information.

Full Time/Part Time Status

Undergraduate Program
In order to be considered a full-time student, an individual must carry a minimum course load of 12 credits in each semester. 

For traditional undergraduate programs, falling below 12 credits could result in loss of residence status and/or some financial aid. Students accepted as full-time matriculants must receive permission to change their status. Forms are available from the registrar.

Graduate Programs
For graduate programs (to include military/veteran students), in non standard terms to be considered full time; those students must be enrolled in a program, registered for three credits per term, and three terms consecutively within a semester, with a total of 9 credits per semester.
*For Financial Aid purposes, the Winter Term is considered an extension of the Fall Semester.

Professional Studies Programs
Regardless of the course start date, undergraduate students at Endicott College simultaneously carrying 12 or more credits throughout a semester (Fall/Winter*, Spring, and Summer) are considered full-time, those simultaneously carrying 9 to 11 credits throughout a semester are considered three-quarter time, and those simultaneously carrying 8 or below credits throughout a semester are considered part-time. Falling below the defined credit categories at any period in the semester could result in the reduction or loss of financial aid and other benefits.
*For Financial Aid purposes, the Winter Term is considered an extension of the Fall Semester.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

A cumulative grade point average of 2.0 is required to graduate with an undergraduate degree. Athletic training, education, and nursing students require a 2.5 GPA to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. This is calculated by giving letter grades the following numerical values:

A

=

4.0 (94-100)

 

B-

=

2.7 (80-83)

 

D+

=

1.3 (67-69)

A-

=

3.7 (90-93)

 

C+

=

2.3 (77-79)

 

D

=

1.0 (64-66)

B+

=

3.3 (87-89)

 

C

=

2.0 (74-76)

 

D-

=

0.7 (60-63)

B

=

3.0 (84-86)

 

C-

=

1.7 (70-73)

 

F

=

0.0 (Below 60)

WX

=

0.0 (Withdrawn Failed)

The grade point average is determined by multiplying the grade point value by the number of credits for a given course, adding the items and dividing by the number of credits attempted.

Example:
If a student in one semester earned three “A” credits, three “B+” credits, three “C”credits, three “C-” credits and three “D+” credits:

   

Grade

 

Grade point value

 

x

 

credits earned

             

GPA

   

A

 

4.0

 

x

 

3

 

=

 

12.0

       
   

B+

 

3.3

 

x

 

3

 

=

 

9.9

       
   

C

 

2.0

 

x

 

3

 

=

 

6.0

       
   

C-

 

1.7

 

x

 

3

 

=

 

5.1

       
   

D+

 

1.3

 

x

 

3

 

=

 

3.9

       
   

 

         

15

     

36.9

       

Then:

36.9

 

÷

 

15

 

=

 

2.46

 

Grade Appeals

It is the purview and responsibility of the faculty to assess student progress. Students who wish to appeal a final course grade must do so within four weeks of the grade being submitted. Students appealing their grade must do the following: 1) make an appointment with the faculty member to discuss the grade; the faculty has two weeks to respond to the student; 2) if not resolved, the student has two weeks to write an appeal to the school dean* (who should notify the faculty member’s supervisor) that outlines the specific points of dispute and requests a meeting with the faculty member, the faculty member’s supervisor, the school dean and the student to discuss the specific points, and 3) if not resolved by steps one and two, the student has two weeks from the time of the second meeting to make an appeal in writing to the Provost of the college. Appeals can only be initiated due to error or documented extenuating circumstances.

*The dean of the school that offers the course in question; students who are unsure who the school dean is should ask their advisor or another faculty or staff member to help them identify the dean.

Grade Changes

Grades cannot be changed after one year of receiving the grade in the course or after the conferral date of the degree, whichever comes first. In order to process grade changes that occur more than one full semester after the submission of the original grade, faculty must complete the Grade Change Form available through Etrieve.

Grading System - All Undergraduate Programs
(Traditional and Professional Studies)

Letter      Grade     Numerical Equivalent Grade Point

A             94-100        4.0

A-             90-93        3.7

B+            87-89        3.3

B              84-86        3.0

B-             80-83        2.7

C+            77-79        2.3

C              74-76        2.0

C-             70-73        1.7

D+            67-69        1.3

D              64-66        1.0

D-             60-63        0.7

F                0-59        0.0

WX            0-59        0.0

A grade of W appears on the transcript but is not calculated into the GPA. The grade point average is determined by multiplying the grade point value by the number of credits for a given course, adding the items and dividing by the number of credits attempted.

Grading System - Graduate Programs

 

Letter Grade

Numerical Equivalent

Grade Point Value

A

94-100

4.0

A-

90-93

3.7

B+

87-89

3.3

B

84-86

3.0

B-

80-83

2.7

C+

77-79

2.3

C

74-76

2.0

C-

70-73

1.7

F

Below 69

0.0

 

A grade of W appears on the transcript but is not calculated into the GPA. The grade point average is determined by multiplying the grade point value by the number of credits for a given course, adding the items and dividing by the number of credits attempted.

Grading: Incomplete Grades

A student may discuss the possibility of an incomplete in a course as a result of illness or other extenuating life circumstances. However, he or she must have completed all but the last one-fifth of the semester and must be in good academic standing in the class. The faculty retains the right to decide whether or not an incomplete is appropriate based on the student’s performance in the class and the nature of the missing assignments. If an incomplete is granted, the faculty will complete the online Incomplete Grade Form, which serves as a contract between both parties and which the faculty will submit to the registrar. The student must complete all missing work in accordance with the agreed upon timeline recorded on the form but no later than seven weeks after the last date of the class for graduate and professional studies programs, or by the second week of classes in the subsequent fall or spring semester for traditional undergraduate programs. Failure to submit assignments by the specified deadline will result in a failing grade for the course. If faculty do not submit a Change of Grade form, the Incomplete grade will result in an F automatically.

Graduation Requirements

Endicott College holds their commencement ceremonies in May. Degrees, however, can be awarded in August, December, January, and May. 

Graduation Eligibility Requirements: To receive an Endicott College degree, a student must have earned the correct number of credits required, completed all requirements for their major and/or concentration, and earned the minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) for his or her degree and major (see catalog for minimum GPA for your major-2.00 is minimum for many undergraduate majors and 3.0 for graduate programs). Graduate Students  must have also satisfactorily completed the Comprehensive Examination in their degree area, if required. Doctoral Students must complete all coursework and  successfully defend their dissertation before graduating.

Additionally, the student must complete a Graduation Application form by the designated deadlines. A graduation fee of $200 is assessed for all students who qualify for a degree from Endicott College. This assessment covers a variety of items associated with Commencement, including degree audit, preparation of diploma, cap and gown, and commencement related ceremonies. The graduation fee is a mandatory requirement, regardless of participation in Commencement ceremonies or activities.

Traditional Undergraduate Students: Your fee may already have been paid.  Check your online bill or Contact Bursar’s Office at 978-232-2031.

Graduate and Professional Studies Students:  Your fee may already have been paid.  Check your online bill or Contact GPS Bursar’s Office at 978-232-2053.

Spring Commencement Ceremony Eligibility Requirements: Students may participate in commencement exercises prior to completion of degree requirements if they meet the following criteria:

         MINIMUM CREDITS - Bachelor degree students may be up to six (6) credits short of the requirements for a degree in their major or the twelve-credit semester internship upon approval of their school Dean. Associate degree students may be up to six (6) credits short of the requirements for a degree in their major. Masters degree students may be up to six (6) credits short of the requirements for a degree in their major. Doctoral degree students must complete all degree requirements and must have disputed their dissertation in order to participate at commencement. Students will not receive their diploma until requirements are complete.

NOTE: A student may not fall below both the minimum credits and the minimum Cumulative GPA in order to participate in Commencement Ceremony.

         MINIMUM GPA - A student entering their last semester with the minimum Cumulative GPA required of their degree and major may participate in Commencement exercises if they fall below that minimum in their last semester. Students will not receive their diplomas until all requirements are complete.

         Students who fail to meet graduation requirements at the end of the semester will be notified, at the time, by the Dean of the appropriate school and will be permitted to participate in the commencement ceremony if they meet the stated requirements.

         All financial obligations to the College must be paid two weeks prior to Commencement in order to participate in the Commencement Ceremony.

         Any student may only participate in one Commencement Ceremony per degree. The $200 application fee must be submitted by March 13st of the commencement year.

Housing/Residency

In some cases, residential housing, as well as a meal plan option, may be available for full-time matriculated graduate or professional studies students. Please contact the Office of Residence Life for more information.

Minor Programs

Undergraduate Traditional 
Minors must be outside of a student’s major and concentration.  Up to two courses which have been prescribed by a student’s major into their General Education requirements may be counted towards a student’s minor. The minimum number of credits for a minor is 18. Core requirements, as designated by the Endicott College Catalog, and free electives may be used to satisfy the minor requirements.  Double Minors Policy: Students may have two minors.  In order to complete a second minor, courses used to fulfill the requirements of the first minor may not be used to meet the requirements of the second minor.  Depending upon the major, students may not be able to complete the requirements of the minors within four years or within the minimum number of credits for their degrees.  See Academic Programs of Study for specific minor requirements.

Prior Learning Assessment

Endicott College recognizes that not all education occurs in a classroom and that adults may have acquired college-level learning through work and life experiences. Our three-credit, semester-based, learner-centric courses offer a personal tour of reflection, retrieval, and writing processes. You’ll create a digital portfolio that documents your professional and personal expertise.

Undergraduate Level PLA (PLA100, PLA102): Your collective experience may earn you up to 15 credits towards an associate degree, or up to 30 credits toward a bachelor’s degree.

Master’s & Doctoral Level PLA (PLA500, PLA700): Your collective experience may earn you up to 6 credits toward a master’s degree, or up to 6 credits toward a doctoral degree.

Registration Options

Incoming Freshman: Students will work with Deans or advisors to complete their first semester course registration.

Online: Matriculated students may register online through MyEndicott, the student database at my.endicott.edu.

Email: Your completed registration form to registrar@endicott.edu. Please include your payment confirmation number in your email.

Mail: Your completed registration form to: Office of the Registrar. Please include your payment or payment confirmation number.

Fax: Your completed registration form to 978-232-2255. Please include your online payment confirmation number. If you would like confirmation for the receipt of your faxed registration form email registrar@endicott.edu.

In Person: Hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Repeated Courses

Any course in which a student receives a grade of “F” or “D,” or a grade that does not satisfy the minimum requirements for their major, may be retaken at Endicott in an attempt to raise the cumulative grade point average (CGPA). The original course and grade remain on the transcript, but the higher grade will be used to calculate the GPA. Credit for the course will only be granted once. Federal Financial Aid regulations allow students to receive financial aid funds or courses repeated due to a failing grade. Courses with a passing grade, including a grade of “D” or “P,” may only be repeated once to be considered for financial aid.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Undergraduate Traditional Programs, Professional Studies Programs
All full time undergraduate students are required to enroll in a minimum course load of twelve credits each semester. In order to maintain satisfactory academic progress, a student must meet both the qualitative and quantitative standards listed below.

(1) Qualitative Standards                           Minimum Cumulative GPA        Academic Status

First-time undergraduate students*                                         1.9                    Good Standing

All other students, including transfers                                     2.0                    Good Standing

*First-time undergraduate students as defined by federal guidelines are entering undergraduates who have never attended an institution of higher education. This category includes students enrolled in the fall term who attended a post-secondary institution for the first time during the prior summer term and students who entered with advanced standing (college credit earned before graduation from high school).

Qualitative Standards for First-time Undergraduate Students

The College recognizes that first-time, first-year students may face transitional difficulties and, therefore, takes these issues into account when determining Satisfactory Academic Progress in the first year (first and second semesters) as follows:

  • A student whose cumulative grade point average is between 1.7 and 1.9 at the end of his/her first semester of study at Endicott College will fall into the category of academic warning and will be required to follow a prescribed academic plan for improvement.

  • A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 1.9 at the conclusion of his/her second semester and who received a warning in the previous semester will be placed on academic probation.

  • If a student’s cumulative grade point average falls below 1.7, he/she is subject to dismissal.

Qualitative Standards for All Other Students (Including Transfers)

A student who no longer has first-time undergraduate status and whose grade point average falls below 2.0 will be placed on academic warning. Students who do not achieve satisfactory academic progress in the subsequent semester will be placed on academic probation. Furthermore, students in this category may be dismissed from the College for any of the following reasons:

  • Failing to achieve satisfactory academic progress for two consecutive semesters, or

  • Attempting 36.0 to 69.9 credits with a resulting cumulative grade point average below 1.8, or

  • Attempting 70.0 or more credits with a resulting cumulative grade point average below 2.0.

(2) Quantitative Standards (time to degree completion)

A full-time student is expected to complete a Bachelor degree within six academic years. The College will evaluate student progress on the basis of the successful completion of a minimum of 21 credits each year.

Graduate Programs

Graduate students must maintain a GPA (grade point average) of 3.0. Students who do not maintain satisfactory grade point averages will be placed on Academic Probation. The student’s academic record will be reviewed by an Academic Review Committee, which may make recommendations that would allow the student to improve the student’s academic status within a specified time period.

For graduate students, in addition to the minimum GPA of 3.0 that is required, students who receive grades lower than B- for six graduate credits will be placed on academic probation. Continued unsatisfactory academic progress may lead to dismissal from the program or loss of financial aid.

Appeals

Students appealing the academic status or financial aid status must complete the Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal form. The Academic Review Committee will consider the appeal and will make a final decision.

Second Bachelor Degree Policy

Students who have graduated from Endicott College with a bachelor’s degree and wish to return to Endicott to earn a second bachelor’s degree must earn a minimum of 33 additional credits. Students must complete all requirements of the major as well as the semester-long internship (if applicable), Senior Thesis I and Senior Thesis II.

Senior Thesis I at a Distance

Undergraduate Traditional Program
Students interested in completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0. In addition, they must submit proposals to their school deans during the semester prior to the start of Senior Thesis I, requesting permission to undertake the course at a distance and describing the topic to be developed. Students must have reliable internet access that can be used on a regular basis in order to connect to the College learning management system and to communicate remotely with the thesis faculty and, potentially, with other students in the class. The final decision rests with the school dean, who may determine that there are other requirements that must be met.

Student Assessment

Certain benchmarks are used to provide students and the College with assessment information concerning academic progress. This assessment provides the College with information about the student’s ability to think critically, reason analytically, solve realistic problems, and write clearly. Many academic programs require additional assessments, to demonstrate competency within a major by completing a major field of study assessment, and students should carefully review the academic requirements in their chosen major fields of study.

Transfer students, students studying at our international campuses, and undergraduate students studying in the Van Loan School at Endicott College should consult with their dean for further information concerning assessment requirements.

Student Health Insurance

In compliance with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts program of Universal Health Care, institutions of higher education are required by law to ensure that undergraduate students registered for 12 or more credits per semester and graduate students registered for nine or more credits per semester are enrolled in a qualified health insurance plan. If you are not enrolled in such a plan, you must enroll in the plan offered through Endicott College. Cost of coverage is $2,465 for undergraduate students and $2,885 for graduate and doctoral students. The plan year is August 19, 2021-August 18, 2022.

Students with Accommodations

Endicott College has a written statement and procedures guideline on disability standards and expectations that is available online and upon request from the Disability Services Office. Students with special needs are encouraged to call the director of disability services at (978)998-7746 before coming to campus to arrange any applicable accommodations.

Technical Standards

Students entering the athletic training or nursing programs are required to sign a statement indicating that they have read, understand, and meet with each of the technical standards essential to their respective programs of study (with certain accommodations, if needed). Students will receive a document from the dean of their respective programs outlining the technical standards related to their programs and will be asked to sign and return the document to the College prior to enrolling in classes. Students will not be permitted to register for classes unless the signed document is on file at the College. Students must remain in compliance with their respective programs technical standards throughout their program of study. A full description of each program’s technical standards are available online, distributed at all admission events, and can be obtained by contacting the appropriate department.

Textbooks

If a textbook is identified for a course, students are expected to purchase the textbook prior to the start of a course. Courses conducted by Endicott College require student involvement in the development of his/her learning. Assigned readings must be completed prior to class to ensure that the maximum learning benefit is attained through the informed exchange of ideas in the classroom. Instructors expect students to be prepared for class and will grade accordingly. Students are advised to check the course syllabus or the Endicott College website for required text(s) which are listed by course section. Students who are registered for the course are able to obtain information about required text on the Course Schedules web page (graduate and professional studies) or MyEndicott (traditional undergraduate).

Transcript Information

Official Transcripts
Transcripts are released in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), and as such transcript requests will not be processed without a legal signature (or secured electronic authorization).

Electronic Transcripts
In order to provide a more convenient transcript ordering process to our students and alumni, we have partnered with the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) to assist us in handling our transcript requests. All requests for official transcripts, including those with supplemental attachments, should be placed online through NSC. You may upload any required attachments as part of the online order process.

Malden School of Nursing
Requests for the Malden School of Nursing transcripts are still submitted through the National Student Clearinghouse, however the delivery method option is paper only. Electronic delivery method is not available for these transcripts.

Delivery Options
Official transcripts may be delivered standard electronic, expedited electronic, FEDEX/United States, and FEDEX/International.  The standard delivery fee is $6 per transcript, additional fees are incurred for expedited and FEDEX delivery options.

Please visit: https://www.endicott.edu/about/key-offices-departments/registrar/grades-and-official-transcripts to complete your transcript request. 

Transfer of Credits

Undergraduate Traditional Program, Professional Studies Programs
A maximum of 85 credits may be transferred from accredited colleges into the bachelor’s programs. Grades of “C” or better will be accepted, and no more than six credits may carry a “C-” grade. A minimum of 24 of the last 30 credits toward a degree must be earned at Endicott.

Accepted transferred credits are counted as credits towards the degree but are not computed into the student’s grade point average. Semester and cumulative grade point averages reflect only courses taken at Endicott College.

This policy does not apply to students in the following majors:  athletic training, education, and nursing.  See specifics for minimum grades in the program descriptions for the majors.

The College will grant credit for transfer courses with a grade of “Pass” unless there is some specific indication on the transcript that the “Pass” is minimal and equivalent to a grade of “D.”

Undergraduate - Associate’s
For associate’s degree programs, a maximum of 32 transfer credits from other accredited colleges may be applied to the Endicott associate’s degree. Grades of “C” or better may be accepted, and no more than six credits may carry a “C-” grade.

Advanced Placement Credits
The College participates in the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board. Course exemption and/or credit will be awarded to students presenting scores of 3 or higher on AP examinations except for math and science exams, which require a minimum score of 4. Detailed information is available on our website at  www.endicott.edu/registrar.  Students should request that their scores be sent to the Office of Admission directly from the College Board (Code 3369). Once the scores have been evaluated, students will be notified of any advanced standing awarded.

Graduate Programs
A maximum of six credits obtained at another institution may be accepted toward a graduate degree program provided it either fulfills a degree requirement or is application as an elective course. The transfer courses that may be considered must carry graduate credit earned from a regionally accredited institution, carry grades of B or better, and not have been used to fulfill degree requirements at other institutions.

M.S. in Homeland Security Studies
At the time of matriculation, students may request transfer of not more than six graduate credits that have been completed at regionally accredited institutions. The courses must be relevant to the program of study, must show a final grade of “B” or higher, and must not have been used to fulfill degree requirements at other institutions. Courses from the Naval Postgraduate School, The United States Army War College and other Professional Military Education institutions are eligible for transfer on a case-by-case basis.

M.Ed. Programs
At the time of matriculation, students may request transfer of not more than six graduate credits completed at other accredited institutions. Only courses relevant to the program of study in which a student has received a grade of “B” or better will be accepted. Courses completed more than five years prior to the student’s acceptance into his or her present program will not be considered for transfer credit.

International Baccalaureate Credit

Undergraduate Traditional Program
Endicott College awards academic credit on a case-by-case basis to students who have participated in the International Baccalaureate program. Six credits (eight for science courses) will be awarded for grades of 4 or higher on each Higher Level Examination. A maximum of 32 credits may be awarded to students who have earned the IB diploma.

Van Loan Student Permission to Take Courses at the Traditional Undergraduate Program

A Van Loan Program student needs permission from both their Program Director and the School Dean (of which the course falls under) to take a Traditional Undergraduate Program school course. This is intended to provide appropriate advisement. No registration form is accepted at the Office of the Registrar unless a permission form has been completed and attached (or e-mailed by the Program Director) to the registration form. This statement applies to all of the payment categories listed on the attached form. Proper registration for a Traditional Undergraduate Program course is the sole responsibility of the student.

ADDITIONAL POLICIES FOR GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Comprehensive Examination Policies
Policies pertaining to graduate programs that require successful completion of a comprehensive exam for graduation are explained in this document. The program directors decide who is eligible. A student must pass all components. Examinations are read by the instructor. Upon successful completion of the examination, and when course work is completed, the degree will be awarded. Students failing the exam are allowed two retakes within a one-year period of time. Failure to successfully complete the examination within that period of time could result in dismissal from the program. Students are allowed up to seven years from the date of starting the first class to the date of completing the Master’s degree. Courses more than seven years old are lost under the default policy of the Van Loan School. The doctoral program Comprehensive Exam will be administered under alternate guidelines.

Test Preparation for Teacher Candidates in Massachusetts
Students enrolled in programs leading to teacher licensure in the state of Massachusetts are required to take and pass all required MTEL’s prior to entering practicum. Free workshops and a full-time MTEL coordinator are provided to assist students in completion of this requirement. 

Master Thesis
Certain graduate programs require completion of a Master Thesis while others require successful completion of a comprehensive examination or capstone experience. Program directors provide the guidelines and format for the research project for those graduate programs that require the completion of a Master Thesis.

Time Limitation
A maximum of seven years from the date of matriculation in a master’s degree program is allowed for completion of the work for the degree, including satisfactory completion of all examinations required. This includes the date of completion of transfer credits. 

ADDITIONAL POLICIES FOR DOCTORAL PROGRAMS

Dissertation
The doctoral program requires completion of a Dissertation. The dissertation is research-based and must include original research. Students develop dissertation proposals in consultation with their dissertation committee. The program director provides the guidelines and format for dissertations.

Dissertation Approval Process
Part of the approval process for the dissertation stage is approval of the student’s dissertation committee. A chair and at least two other readers are identified for each dissertation committee. These names should be forwarded to the Provost once the team is formed by the doctoral directors. When the student completes the dissertation, all members of the dissertation committee are required to sign the dissertation signature/title page that is attached. Once the original signatures are affixed to this page, the page should be forwarded to the Provost, who will inform the Registrar’s Office as each doctoral student completes his/her dissertation. This will allow for a coordinated and orderly response to the Registrar’s office staff. In order to have accurate information in the Spring Commencement program and to have diplomas prepared correctly, a date will be established each spring by the College Registrar that will be the last date the Registrar will be able to accept a doctoral student’s name for the Spring Commencement.

Dissertation Continuation Stage
If a doctoral student’s dissertation is not completed by the end of the student’s Dissertation course, the student will be required to register for the Dissertation Continuation course and will be required to pay the Doctoral Dissertation Continuation fee. They will receive an Incomplete for the original Dissertation course. They will need to continue to register for the Doctoral Dissertation Continuation course each semester until their Dissertation is complete. Students in this phase of their program are defined as half-time students for enrollment purposes.