Nov 28, 2021  
2007-2008 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2007-2008 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    PSY 310 - Abnormal Psychology


    Investigation of the causation, development, and treatment of psychological disorders from major theoretical perspectives. Current psychiatric classification is used to examine such topics as schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and other forms of psychosocial deviance. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    LST 103 - Academic Writing I (offered in Spain)


    Students are introduced to the process approach to writing and keep a portfolio of their work. Revision techniques are practiced; students address grammatical issues within the context of their writing. Credits are not applicable toward the degree. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    LST 104 - Academic Writing II (offered in Spain)


    The course continues to develop the skills introduced in Academic Writing I. Students develop a portfolio of their work. In addition, some of the writing assignments are in response to readings, and the final paper involves the use of outside sources. The goal is to prepare students for ENG 101. Credits are not applicable toward the degree. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ACC 150 - Accounting I


    Presentation of accounting as the language of business and as an essential part of the decision-making process for the business manager, and the investor based on generally accepted accounting principles. Provides understanding of the preparation, uses and limitations of financial statements. Introduction to the methods of valuation of inventories and estimation of depreciation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Formerly BUS 150.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ACC 151 - Accounting II


    Continues to develop the foundations for a thorough understanding of basic accounting principles. The emphasis is on accounting issues that are relevant to the corporate form of business organization. In particular, dividends, retained earnings, long term liabilities and investments are examined. Introduces cash flow statements and cost/profit relationships. Ends with the comparison of financial and managerial accounting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 150.  Formerly BUS 151.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ACC 460 - Accounting Information for Decision Makers


    Equips students with the skills and knowledge to design and use effective management accounting information systems to both plan and control business activities in organizations. Topics include concepts related to management and decision support systems, business intelligence systems and enterprise information systems.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 300, ACC 315.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ACC 300 - Accounting Information Systems


    Provides a basic knowledge of how accounting information systems (AIS) function in today’s business environment.    Transaction flowcharting and internal controls of the revenue, expenditure and conversion cycles are covered in detail. Other topics include business process modeling, data management including file vs. relational databases and the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC).
     


    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 115 or equivalent competency.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    DRA 200 - Acting Techniques I


    Grounded in the Stanislavski and Meisner acting methods, students train through response, concentration, and imagination exercises. These techniques are applied in groups, individually, and in basic scene work. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    DRA 205 - Acting Techniques II


    Improvisational techniques, characterization, and interpretation employed in Acting Techniques I are applied to scenes and plays. Scenes from classic and modern plays are rehearsed and studied in terms of styles and historical perspective. The course also includes the effective use of the speaking voice on stage, and movement for actors.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    NU 410 - Acute Care Nursing


    This course builds on content taught in prior nursing courses. Emphasis is placed on the application of the nursing process in providing therapeutic nursing interventions to adults with complex health problems: acute illness, multi-system disease, and trauma. Content includes the use of equipment, technology, procedures and pharmacological agents commonly used in the treatment of complex health problems. The nurse’s role in providing and managing care for clients with complex alterations in health in hospital settings is addressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior level status.

    (Cr: 8)
  
  •  

    PE 321 - Adapted Physical Education I


    This course addresses the “inclusion movement” as it applies to teaching physical education to students with disabilities. Students will explore the history and philosophy of adapted physical education, laws that impact adapted physical education and sport participation, individualized education programs, and instructional strategies that can enhance the well-being of students with and without disabilities. Students will incorporate the adaptive teaching progressions in sport skills to teach their peers in a physical education setting. Aquatic skills will be emphasized.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PE 322 - Adapted Physical Education II


    This course addresses inclusion strategies for students with moderate and severe disabilities. Students will develop instructional strategies in the areas of adventure programming and martial arts that can enhance the well-being of students with and without disabilities. Students will also develop lesson plans in adventure programming and martial arts to teach their peers in a physical education setting.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    MSL 301 - Adaptive Tactical Leadership


    Challenges cadets to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with challenging scenarios related to squad tactial operations.  Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes and actions.  Based on such feedback, as well as their own self-evaluations, cadets continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities.

    (Cr: 0.0)
  
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    HMS 324 - Addictive Behaviors


    The physical and psychosocial impact of addictions will be explored with an emphasis upon the involvement of professionals from different disciplines. Research studies on the prevalence, causes, and problems associated with addictive behaviors will be explored, as well as related policy questions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AT 306 - Administration of Athletic Training Programs


    This course will probe the various areas an individual must be familiar with to manage an Athletic Training Program. Topics include: legal issues, management principles and fiscal policies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PSY 203 - Adulthood and Aging


    Focus on the various biological, psychological and sociological changes associated with the aging process within the framework of the developmental tasks of early adulthood through the middle and later years of life. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ACC 401 - Advanced Accounting


    A continuation and expansion of Intermediate Accounting II, this course covers accounting principles for consolidations and combinations, accounting for branches, accounting for liquidations, accounting for nonprofit organizations, and other selected topics.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 302.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PE 241 - Advanced Coaching Techniques


    This course is designed for students to build a coaching repertoire that enables them to successfully coach and administer a competitive sport team at any developmental level. Students will use the Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning as a framework for developing a coaching portfolio that contains the content and methodology to develop the physical, intellectual, and affective skills of athletes.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    VC 322 - Advanced Computer Animation


    This advanced interdisciplinary studio course emphasizes three dimensional animation on the computer as a tool for visual communications, advertising, and artistic expression. Individual and collaborative projects will be organized around the students’ area of specialization/interest in 3- D computer modeling. Theory and animation techniques will be covered as well as digital image manipulation in virtual space.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    VC 302 or permission of the instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    VC 403 - Advanced Computer Projects


    This advanced, interdisciplinary studio course emphasizes visual design on the computer as a tool for corporate communications and public relations. Collaborative projects will be organized around the students’ areas of specialization, including such topics as 3-D computer modeling, advanced animation techniques, and pre-press for printing.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    VC 302, VC 310.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 215 - Advanced Drawing I


    Through series work, utilizing a variety of subject matter resources, students will expand their drawing vocabulary and increase their understanding and use of theme in variation and visual metaphor. Students will examine and prioritize, utilize and evolve visual ideas.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 106.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 216 - Advanced Drawing II


    Students will continue to increase their visual experiences and expand their ideas and creative expression in drawing. Series work using theme and visual metaphor will be emphasized. Students are expected to work independently.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 215.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ID 301 - Advanced Interior Design Studio III A


    The design and programming process is applied to projects of increasing complexity and scope with consideration given to hospitality and institutional uses. Students advance their design knowledge and implementation through advanced programming and user analysis incorporating Universal Design, environmental systems, and life safety codes.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 218, ID 200, ID 202, ID 206, ID 220, ID 230.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ID 302 - Advanced Interior Design Studio III B


    The design and programming process is applied to projects of increasing complexity and scope with consideration given to institutional uses. Students advance their design knowledge and implementation through advanced programming and user analysis incorporating Universal Design, environmental systems, and life safety codes.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 218, ID 200, ID 202, ID 206, ID 220, ID 230.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    VC 401 - Advanced Issues in Visual Communications


    Emphasis on refining personal design sensibilities and technical skills. Students work on individual projects while further integrating type and image. Development of a professional portfolio and personal identity system.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Visual Communications status or permission of the instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 304 - Advanced Painting I


    Explores painting from an aesthetic and philosophical perspective, as well as a creative thought process requiring both inquiry and critical thinking. Students will expand their technical and craft knowledge while developing painting as a tool for personal expression. Students will also begin the process of creating a unique artistic style and an expansion of their visual vocabulary through exploring various techniques and media.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 202 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 305 - Advanced Painting II


    Continuing the emphasis on painting as a tool for personal expression begun in Advanced Painting I, the student is expected to make further progress in developing a personal style.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 215, ART 304.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PHT 312 - Advanced Photographic Methods


    This advanced studio course s provides an intensive exploration of exposure control, traditional negative making, silver printing, and digital output. Projects will involve Specific materials testing, printing methodology and the exploration of formal photographic approaches in relation specific subject matter. Students will produce a final photographic portfolio.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 216.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PHT 325 - Advanced Photography Seminar


    Provides advanced photography students an opportunity to develop greater meaning and direction in their photography. The experience will begin with an examination of images and why we make them, and will expand into a visual exploration of media and expression. Coursework and a major project will culminate in a final examination and exhibition.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 301.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    SP 301 - Advanced Spanish I


    Further development of communicative competencies in the Spanish language will be the focus of this course. Films, videos, interactive activities and a range of readings will provide the basis for written assignments and classroom discussions.  Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 201, SP 202, or four or more years of Spanish coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    SP 302 - Advanced Spanish II


    A continuation of Advanced Spanish I, this course further emphasizes students’ ability to speak and write in the Spanish language.  Satisifies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

     

     

     

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 301 or four or more years of Spanish coursework.

    (Cr: 3)

  
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    MTH 326 - Advanced Statistics


    Students will calculate, analyze and interpret statistical data using computer software. Topics include: inferential statistics; multiple linear, quadratic, and exponential regression, correlation and prediction; time-series analysis, decision making, and forecasting. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 126 or equivalent statistics course.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    FR 300 - Advanced Topics in French


    Taught in French, this course will provide students with the opportunity to further develop their understanding of the French language through a focus on conversation, film, fiction, the media, or poetry.  Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new. 
    Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FR 201, FR 202, or four or more years of French coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    SP 300 - Advanced Topics in Spanish


    Taught in Spanish, this course will provide students with the opportunity to develop further their understanding of the Spanish language through a focus on conversation, film, fiction, the media, or poetry.  Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 201, SP 202, or four or more years of Spanish coursework.   Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CMM 390 - Advanced Video Workshop


    Television is a tool for communication with impact. This course concentrates on the creative design and critical thinking skills necessary in all areas of the very competitive production business. Specific content includes a detailed study and discussion of the key issues involved in the planning of a video project, content design and organization.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMM 255, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CSC 401 - Advanced Web Design and Programming


    An advanced examination and application of the key principles, technologies and applications used for internet productions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 200, CSC 340.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CMM 103 - Advertising Fundamentals


    Basic principles and practices of advertising and their relation to the economy, society, and media. Focus on effective marketing strategies, research, ethical responsibilities, agency role, and media planning.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 230 - African-American History


    A survey of the unique history, contributions and struggles of African Americans from 1619 to the present including: slavery; the abolitionist movement; the emergence of free black communities; the Civil War; emancipation and Reconstruction; segregation in the Jim Crow South; African American leadership and institution building in the North; Blacks during the depression and the roots of the post-WWII Civil Rights Movement. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with HST 230

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HST 230 - African-American History


    A survey of the unique history, contributions and struggles of African Americans from 1619 to the present including: slavery; the abolitionist movement; the emergence of free black communities; the Civil War; emancipation and Reconstruction; segregation in the Jim Crow South; African American leadership and institution building in the North; Blacks during the depression and the roots of the post-WWII Civil Rights Movement. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with AMS 230.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    POL 213 - American Government and Politics


    A synthesis of the theoretical, constitutional and pragmatic aspects of the United States. Such topics as federalism, constitutional analysis, civil liberties and contemporary politics are considered. Offered in alternate years. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Formerly POL 311.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 337 - American Indian Experience: An Introduction to the Literature


    American Indian experience recorded in fiction, autobiography, poetry, and essay in the 20th century and beyond emphasizes specific tribal traditions, values, and practices. The impact of United States government policies on native people, families, and tribes is recorded in the literature. Historical, geographical, political, and economic contexts are considered in this study of works produced by American Indians. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with ENG 337.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 337 - American Indian Experience: An Introduction to the Literature


    American Indian experience recorded in fiction, autobiography, poetry, and essay in the 20th century and beyond emphasizes specific tribal traditions, values, and practices. The impact of United States government policies on native people, families, and tribes is recorded in the literature. Historical, geographical, political, and economic contexts are considered in this study of works produced by American Indians. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with AMS 337.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 203 - American Literature I


    Surveys American literature from the pre-contact period to the Civil War, focusing on how significant literary and diverse cultural texts from this period reflect the struggles of a growing nation. Students will read and analyze indigenous creation stories, exploration accounts, autobiographies, sermons, diaries, letters, public documents, and other narratives, frequently paired in order to discover alternate viewpoints. Representative authors may include De Las Casas, Smith, Winthrop, Bradstreet, Jemison, Franklin, Occum, Adams (Abigail and John), Jefferson, Rowson, Irving, Kirkland, Emerson, Hawthorne, Wilson, Child, Grimke, and Truth.


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 204 - American Literature II


    A continuation of American Literature I, this course covers important literary trends from the end of the Civil War to the turn of the twentieth century; the modern period from 1910 to 1945; and the contemporary period from 1945 to the present. Representative authors may include Harding Davis, Twain, Melville, James, Wharton, Crane, Sin Far, Fitzgerald, Chopin, Yezierska, and Baldwin.


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    POL 315 - American Political Thought


    Explores the historical evolution of American political ideas through examination of core values and recurring controversies.  Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One social science core course.  Formerly HST 315

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 101 - American Popular Culture


    Explores the many forms that American culture has taken throughout the country’s history, including bestsellers and beliefs, myths and movies, legends and laws. Students will learn to recognize and interpret cultural symbols and to better understand the complex world in which they live. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 325 - American Renaissance


    The period beginning with 1850 experienced a flourishing of literary activity in America that held the attention of the nation and world. It corresponded time-wise to things that were being re-shaped from an economic, political, and social perspective. The course will make the attempt to see how each influenced the other. It will also explore efforts on the part of writers and artists to explore and explain the emerging American character. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities, and Writing Designated core requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with ENG 325.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 325 - American Renaissance


    The period beginning with 1850 experienced a flourishing of literary activity in America that held the attention of the nation and world. It corresponded time-wise to things that were being re-shaped from an economic, political, and social perspective. The course will make the attempt to see how each influenced the other. It will also explore efforts on the part of writers and artists to explore and explain the emerging American character. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities, and Writing Designated core requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HST 103, HST 104, AMS 101, or permission of instructor.  
    Crosslisted with AMS 325.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 220 - American Short Story Cycles


    Introduction to the genre of the short story cycle. Through class discussions and essay writing, students will discover the various ways writers have found to create short story cycles or unified short story collections: recurring themes, characters, settings, and plot patterns are some of the unifying elements that will be examined. Representative writers include Sherwood Anderson, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Flannery O’Connor, Louise Erdrich, and Richard Wright. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with ENG 220

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 220 - American Short Story Cycles


    Introduction to the genre of the short story cycle. Through class discussions and essay writing, students will discover the various ways writers have found to create short story cycles or unified short story collections: recurring themes, characters, settings, and plot patterns are some of the unifying elements that will be examined. Representative writers include Sherwood Anderson, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Flannery O’Connor, Louise Erdrich, and Richard Wright. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with AMS 220.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 150 - American Sign Language I


    Addresses issues related to deaf culture and cultural diversity in the United States, including historical and theoretical approaches to signed languages. It examines the principal theories of sign language learning utilizing the two classroom techniques: expressive (speaking) as well as receptive (listening). The course is designed to build classroom communities that respect American Sign Language, the native language of the majority of deaf people in North America. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 151 - American Sign Language II


    This course continues to build on the language skills developed in AMS 150 with additional attention given to issues of deaf culture and cultural diversity in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on expressive (signing) where participants can demonstrate their competence in ASL. The course is designed to build classroom communities that respect American Sign Language, the native language of the majority of deaf people in North America. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: AMS 150 or prior coursework in American Sign Language.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BIO 201 - Anatomy and Physiology I


    A study of the human organism relating structure and function. The approach is an integrated one, stressing interrelationships and feedback systems: organic molecules, the cell, cellular respiration, tissues, skin, bones, muscles, and the nervous system. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 101, BIO 102 or permission of instructor.  Formerly SCN 201.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    BIO 202 - Anatomy and Physiology II


    A study of the human organism relating structure and function. Topics include: the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system, endocrinology, digestion, metabolism, the urinary system, water and electrolyte balance, and the reproductive systems. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 201.  Formerly SCN 202.

    (Cr: 4)
  
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    PHL 217 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy


    An exploration of the central debates, texts, and developments in philosophy in the ancient (Greco-Roman) and medieval periods, drawing on Hellenistic texts as well as some religious thought from Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Issues to be considered are: 1) what is the nature of the world, and its relation to divinity (metaphysics/philosophical theology)? 2) what is the best form of political life for humanity? and 3) What should human beings seek and do, in order to live a fully flourishing life?  Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    MTH 126 - Applied Statistics


    Introduces the student to applied statistical methods used in industry and scientific applications.  Emphasis will be on the practical aspects as students use descriptive and inferential statistics to analyze real data in applications of hypothesis testing, ANOVA, and linear regression and correlation.  Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    A TI 83 or 84 calculator is required. 

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BIO 250 - Archeology and Evolution


    An investigation into how archeological techniques and contemporary methods in science have shaped our present understanding of evolutionary thought. Students will discover the truths between the facts and theories associated with the evolution of life. Students will examine past and present theories that challenge the theoretical side of evolutionary thought: Creationism, Darwinian thought, and Intelligent Design Theory.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 102, or BIO 130,  or permission of instructor.  Formerly SCN 250.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    ENG 218 - Argument Based Writing


    Builds on the writing and critical thinking skills introduced in ENG 101, offering additional focus on and development of skills used in the reading and writing of academic/argument-based essays.   Students will critically read and respond to challenging academic texts, and compose thoughtful and well-supported argument-based essays and research papers. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 285 - Art and World Culture


    Compares and contrasts the values that give rise to varied artistic practices. Examines the different concepts of what constitutes art in different cultures. Explores specific social, Political, and religious conditions that provide understanding of works of art at a particular moment in history. Treats both Western and non-Western art. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with IST 285.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    IST 285 - Art and World Culture


    Compares and contrasts the values that give rise to varied artistic practices. Examines the different concepts of what constitutes art in different cultures. Explores specific social, Political, and religious conditions that provide understanding of works of art at a particular moment in history. Treats both Western and non-Western art. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with ART 285.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 309 - Art in American Culture


    Explores American art from pre-Colonial times to the present. Traces the historical development of architecture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture. Critically investigates the ever-shifting theoretical definitions, delineation, and constructions of what constitutes American art. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 101, ART 102 or permission of instructor.  Crosslisted with ART 308.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 308 - Art in American Culture


    Explores American art from pre-Colonial times to the present. Traces the historical development of architecture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture. Critically investigates the ever-shifting theoretical definitions, delineation, and constructions of what constitutes American art. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 101, ART 102, or permission of instructor.  Crosslisted with AMS 309.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 318 - Art in Modern and Postmodern Societies: 1900 to the Present


    Surveys art of the twentieth century. Traces the styles of art in the twentieth century. Covers the evolution of modernism, the origins and development of postmodernism, gender relations, new technologies, and issues-based art. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 102 - Art in Society: 1400 to the Present


    Examines the production of art from the fifteenth through the twentieth centuries. Explores art from a variety of cultures and geographic regions. Introduces students to the conventional designations of stylistic periods, treats major works and artists of these eras, and acquaints the student with the traditional methods of art history. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 101 - Art in Society: Prehistory to 1400


    Explores the production of art from prehistory (40,000 BCE) through the Medieval Period (1400 CE). Examines art from a variety of cultures and geographic regions. Introduces students to the conventional designations of stylistic periods, treats major works and artists in this span of time, and familiarizes the student with the traditional methods of art history. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 319 - Art of the Mediterranean Basin: Egypt, Greece, and Italy in Antiquity


    Art Historical seminar exploring topics of art and archaeology of the Mediterranean: Egypt, Greece and Italy from the Bronze Age (c. 3000 BCE) to the end of the Roman Imperial period (c. 410 CE). Covers such topics as religion and mythology, gender Relations, the view and treatment of foreigners and slaves, politics and art and contemporary constructions of antiquity. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ECN 415 - Asia Pacific: Economies and Markets


    Examines contemporary economies, markets, Political developments, international Relationships, and their significance within the Pacific Rim. Introduces students to the diverse countries of the Asia Pacific region and their interrelationships within the context of domestic trends, historical and cultural background, as well as international Politics and economics. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior year status.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    SM 304 - Athletic Event Management Practicum


    Students explore the day to day operations of managing various types of athletic facilities, contests, and functions. This course is designed to prepare students for future careers in various sport management positions. The on-site experience allows for extensive managerial responsibilities including problem solving and personnel coordination.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 203, SM 215.

    (Cr: 1)
  
  •  

    AT 101 - Athletic Training I


    This course introduces students to the domains of athletic training. Emphasis is on prevention of injury, medical terminology, and basic evaluative and taping techniques.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    AT 203 - Athletic Training II


    This course provides students with learning experiences in prevention, recognition, and treatment of specific sports injuries and illnesses. Emphasis on mechanism of injury, biomechanics, and management procedures. Major anatomical components are also discussed.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 101, SCN 201.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    AT 310 - Athletic Training Practicum


    A junior year clinical education experience that combines clinical hours with lecture information and allows students to demonstrate and refine their evaluative, rehabilitative, and educational skills. Students apply knowledge gained in the classroom to the clinical setting. All clinical hours must be obtained at an approved setting under a certified athletic trainer. All students will be placed at the discretion of the Chair of Athletic Training. Includes a minimum hour/day requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 201.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AT 311 - Athletic Training Practicum


    A junior clinical education experience that combines clinical hours with lecture information and allows students to demonstrate and refine their evaluative, rehabilitative, and educational skills. Students must apply and demonstrate skills pertaining to all six domains in athletic training. All clinical hours must be obtained at an approved setting under a certified athletic trainer. All students will be placed at the discretion of the Chair of Athletic Training. Includes a minimum hour/day requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 310.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ACC 350 - Auditing


    Examines the role of auditing in financial reporting and corporate governance. Topics include the purpose of auditing and assurance, the importance of auditor independence as well as the techniques and procedures in carrying out financial statement audits. The agency theory is used to explain the demand for auditing and corporate governance and the related issues in contemporary business settings are investigated.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 300 , BUS 302.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PHL 310 - Bioethics


    An overview of the nature of ethical problems that face society today, and the ethical theories and principles relevant to these problems. Examines areas related to health, genetic engineering and the environment. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 101 or PHL 104.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BIO 340 - Bioinformatics


    The deluge of DNA and protein sequence information due to genome sequencing projects (e.g. Human Genome Project) has given rise to bioinformatics, a burgeoning new industry. This course will train students in computer technology, to understand and interpret biological and biochemical data. We will focus on database and sequence comparisons, genomics and proteomics analysis, computer simulation and modeling, utilization of software and hardware, and laboratory data collection and analysis. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 225, or permission of Dean of Arts and Sciences.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BIO 115 - Biosphere


    An integrated approach to understanding the Earth, environment, and its processes. A presentation of basic principles and applications of earth science, chemistry, and biology as they relate to the Earth and real world. Basic principles from the science disciplines are investigated through the laboratory experience. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Formerly SCN 115.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    BIO 383 - Biotechnology Lab Techniques


    This course is designed to provide students with fundamental laboratory skills found in the majority of industry or academic research labs. These include cell culture, HPLC and protein purification, DNA and RNA isolation, molecular cloning, gel electrophoresis, lab bench calculations.
     


    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 102 and BIO 103.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 227 - Boston History


    Surveys the history of Boston from the colonial era to the present. Examines the legacy of the Puritan presence in the 17thcentury, the city’s role in the Revolutionary War, the immigrant experience, reform movements, race relations, urban planning, and politics. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with HST 227

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HST 227 - Boston History


    Surveys the history of Boston from the colonial era to the present. Examines the legacy of the Puritan presence in the 17thcentury, the city’s role in the Revolutionary War, the immigrant experience, reform movements, race relations, urban planning, and politics. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with AMS 227.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 240 - Boston Writers


    Boston Writers will examine works of poetry, fiction and drama by writers from Boston and the surrounding area. Discussions and essay assignments will focus on how writers have responded to the city and region. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with ENG 240

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 240 - Boston Writers


    Boston Writers will examine works of poetry, fiction and drama by writers from Boston and the surrounding area. Discussions and essay assignments will focus on how writers have responded to the city and region. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with AMS 240.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 460 - Brand Management


    Recognizing the strategic importance of branding, this course examines theories and strategies for building, leveraging, and defending strong brands, and showcases current opportunities and challenges facing brand managers. Emphasis is placed on understanding psychological principles at the consumer level that will improve managerial decision making with respect to brands.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 213 - British Literature I


    Surveys the English tradition in literature, beginning with the early Middle Ages and ending with the Restoration. Important themes will include: faith, chivalry, love, marriage, adultery, and heroism. Readings will include selections from Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe and poetry selections from Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Marvell, Wroth, Raleigh, Queen Elizabeth, and Milton. While we will be situating these works in their historical and cultural contexts, emphasis will be on the close reading of these texts. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 214 - British Literature II


    Designed to build on the texts and contexts of British Literature I, beginning in the early 18th Century and ending in the present day. Course examines the influence of the Enlightenment, Romanticism, the Industrial Revolution and the fall of the Aristocracy, post-World War I Modernism, post-World War II Existentialism and Absurdism, late 20th century Post-Modernism, and 21st century social anxiety on British textual production. Students will analyze a variety of genres including, but not limited to fiction, poetry, drama and film.


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CMM 260 - Broadcast Journalism


    Introduction to announcing performance and criticism for radio and television. Emphasis is placed on vocal delivery and on-camera performance for a variety of program types and broadcast situations. On-air broadcast journalism techniques are explored in depth.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ID 234 - Building Codes and Standards


    This course will introduce students to the intent scope, detail, and examination of local, state, national, and international building codes, standards, and regulations that protect the health, safety, and welfare of the general public in new and existing materials and methods of construction. Emphasis will be given to the international, federal, state, Local and professional standards. Students will also develop an understanding of Universal Design and the Americans with Disabilities Act Guidelines.


    (Cr: 1)
  
  •  

    BUS 370 - Business Analysis and Research


    A prerequisite for the Semester Internship, focus is on translating a business problem into a research project. Includes approaches to industry and internal analysis, ways to identify relevant data and appropriate sources, primary and secondary data collection, methods of data analysis and effective interpretation and presentation of findings. Examples of published research in business will be analyzed to provide a foundation for the creation of an effective research design proposal for an actual business problem as the final deliverable in the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 200, BUS 121, junior year status or permission of the instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 425 - Business and Society


    Examines social and ethical challenges faced by managers and the potential of such challenges to impact the business institution, its stakeholders, investors, the community, and society. Using readings and case studies, situations where business strategy and public Policy or personal interest overlap are examined to develop a conceptual framework to guide socially responsible individual and corporate problem solving and decision-making in business.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 110 - Business Computers I


    Provides current introduction to computer system concepts and personal computers in particular. Implications of information technology on business are explored. Problem-solving skills using word processing and presentation software and the World Wide Web are developed.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 115 - Business Computers II


    Builds on understanding of information technology and its impact on business. Emphasis is on using advanced presentation, database and Web creation software to solve problems in business.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 110 or equivalent competency.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ESL 023 - Business English I (Offered in Spain)


    This course introduces students to Business English at an intermediate level. It aims to provide the business vocabulary students require to participate effectively in business courses and in the world of work. It combines the most recent ideas from the world of business with a strongly task based approach. Students develop their communication skills in presentations, meetings, negotiations telephoning and social English.  Credits for this course do not apply to a degree.


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ESL 024 - Business English II (Offered in Spain)


    This course takes students from intermediate level to upper intermediate level. It is intended for students who are interested in increasing their knowledge of Business practice and concepts. Authentic material and an intensive task based approach helps students to feel more confident in areas of communication. Students discuss case studies and report their recommendations emulating authentic business situations. Credits for this course do not apply to a degree.


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ESL 025 - Business English III (Offered in Spain)


    This is an intensive course taken in the summer semester which introduces the students to upper intermediate business English. It builds on the skills introduced in Business English II and prepares the students for English Communication. Students continue to study business topics and acquire business vocabulary. They write business letters, reports, press releases, agendas, minutes and summarize articles from business magazines and newspapers.  Credits for this course do not apply to a degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 120 - Business Fundamentals I


    Half of a two-semester integrative interdisciplinary course (with BUS 121) focusing on the interdependencies in business while providing a foundation for advanced study and a framework for defining internship and career direction. Readings, exercises, team projects, and the first internship experience are used to develop the analytical, interpersonal, and communication skills required for business success.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 121 - Business Fundamentals II


    Half of a two-semester integrative interdisciplinary course (with BUS 120), focuses on the interdependencies in business while providing a foundation for advanced study and a framework for defining internship and career direction. Readings, exercises, team projects, and the first internship experience are used to develop the analytical, interpersonal, and communication skills required for business success.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 120.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 415 - Business Negotiation


    Provides students with techniques for becoming skillful negotiators in a wide range of settings. The framework and fundamental steps of negotiating, including how to develop an effective negotiating action plan are examined. Students will be introduced to current theory surrounding the negotiation process.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 475 - Business Strategy and Policy


    A culminating course in the Business program, examines the challenge to top management presented by a new or expanding business. Students learn decision-making for an organization experiencing growth and change. Topics include organization planning and strategy in a competitive environment. The student is asked, from the point of view of the senior manager, to integrate and apply the knowledge learned in accounting, finance, marketing, organizational behavior, etc., to develop a comprehensive strategy for a firm that can lead to competitive advantage and high performance results.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 121, BUS 200, BUS 170, or permission of the instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 365 - Business, The Environment and Sustainability


    Examination of environmental and social consequences of industrial society and managerial responses with emphasis on the effect of sustainability on corporate performance.  The impacts, in both domestic and global contexts, of current trends in industrial operations and government policies on health, equity, and environmental sustainability will be considered.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ID 230 - CAD (3–D)


    CAD (3–D) builds upon the two-dimensional knowledge gained in ID 220 Introduction to CAD + Technology, by focusing on three-dimensional techniques and presentations. Students will undertake advanced CAD projects and presentations preparing them for integration of their skills into the interior design studio.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 206, ID 208,ID 220.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ID 220 - CAD 2-D and Technology


    This course is intended to give students a set of strategies for incorporating technology into their design work. Students will gain a working knowledge of the most common programs for used today. The first part of the course will cover the Microsoft (MS) Office Suite and Outlook. The second part of the course will focus on learning the AUTOCAD platform.

    (Cr: 3)
 

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