Jun 29, 2022  
2007-2008 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2007-2008 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    IST 310 - Economies and Peoples


    A broad survey of world economic history from the earliest times to the present. The causes and effects of economic change and expansion will be studied. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with HST 310.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PSY 303 - Educational Psychology


    Focus is on psychological theory as it applies to educational tests, individual differences, learning and motivation, communication and group processes, and normal physical, social and mental growth and development during the school years.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100 and PSY 200.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 410 - Electronic Business


    An overview of the tools, skills, business concepts, strategic opportunities, and social issues associated with electronic commerce on the Internet. Business process designs for e-businesses will be reveiwed.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    FR 101 - Elementary French


    This course will introduce the foundational elements of the French language, and build conversation and grammar skills. Students will practice their spoken language in required language drill sessions with peer teaching assistants.  Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ITL 101 - Elementary Italian


    This course will introduce the foundational elements of the Italian language, and build conversation and grammar skills. Students will practice their spoken language in required language drill sessions with peer teaching assistants.  Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PE 310 - Elementary Physical Education Methods


    Students will learn and put into practice the pedagogical competencies which deliver developmentally appropriate physical activities to children in grades Pre-K through 8. Primary emphasis will be given to best teaching practices and the implementation of curricula models that are based on developmental levels of students. Emphasis will be given to development of lesson plans, unit plans, objectives, procedures, formats, evaluation, legal liability, and other pedagogical components. Students will incorporate the skill-themes of rhythms and developmental games to teach their peers in a physical education setting.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    SP 101 - Elementary Spanish I


    This course will introduce the foundational elements of the Spanish language, including basic language and grammar. Students will exercise their developing spoken language skills in weekly practice labs with peer teaching assistants. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Minimal (e.g. less than one year of high school level) or no prior coursework in Spanish.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    SP 102 - Elementary Spanish II


    This course will build on basic conversational skills and grammar. Students will exercise their spoken language skills in weekly practice labs with peer teaching assistants. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 101 or one-two years of Spanish coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ED 221 - Emergent Literacy Instruction


    Students will examine language acquisition and emerging communication abilities in young children with a particular focus on reading, writing, speaking and listening. The characteristics of a print and language rich environment will be explored, including the use of developmentally appropriate written language activities in the early childhood classroom.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 201 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CSC 325 - Emerging Technologies


    The fundamental process underlying the emergence of new information technology and its effects on existing information systems, business, and society will be examined. Both qualitative and quantitative methods for technology assessment are reviewed. An emphasis is placed on developing technology-forecasting research.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior year status.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    MUS 105 - Endicott College Chorus


    Participation in a singing ensemble which rehearses weekly, performs works of varied music styles, and focuses on techniques to achieve proper choral sound and musical interpretation. Can be repeated for up to three credits which will fulfill one Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  
  •  

    ENV 338 - Energy and the Environment


    The complexities and consequences of energy use in our technical society will be evaluated and discussed. The course will examine and analyze the fossil fuel era, the multitude of energy sources currently available and the benefits and environmental costs of each. The course will also focus on the science and mathematics of energy in order to give the students a multidimensional perspective of the most fundamental problem of current and future society.  Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENV 220 and junior status.  Formerly SCN 338.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ESL 026 - English as a Second Language I (Offered in Spain)


     This course is an intermediate level general English course taken simultaneously with Academic Writing I. Task-based language activities are introduced in short readings and film segments which simulate real situations which the students are likely to encounter. Grammar is taught using oral, written and interactive exercises. Credits for this course do not apply to a degree.


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ESL 038 - English as a Second Language II (Offered in Spain)


    This general English course takes the students from intermediate to upper intermediate level. It aims to continue to build upon the skills acquired in English as a Second Language I. Task-based language activities are introduced in short readings and film segments which simulate real situations which the students are likely to encounter. Grammar is taught using oral, written and interactive exercises. Credits for this course do not apply to a degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 106 - English Communication (Offered in Spain)


    This course is intended for students whose skills are between upper intermediate and advanced level. It reflects the fast changing world of business with materials from authentic sources. Students study business topics and acquire proficiency in written and oral communication. Students learn about the causes of communication breakdowns and how to avoid them through effective listening and note taking. They analyze case studies, role play authentic business situations and begin to understand the effects different styles of management have on business outcomes.
     


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 354 - Entrepreneurial Finance


    Examines issues related to funding entrepreneurial firms at all stages of their existence. How to identify worthy business opportunities, raise and structure financing, and ultimately harvest returns are covered. Specific topics include: venture capital markets, deal structuring, valuations, later stage financing, going public and other harvesting methods. 
     


    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 170 or BUS 210.


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 300 - Entrepreneurship


    Examines historic evolution, economic, and Societal impact of the entrepreneurship process from conception to implementation of a new venture. Focus is on attributes of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial teams, their search and assessment of various resources to convert opportunities into profitable businesses.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 210 or BUS 170, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ID 330 - Environmental Design Literature and Theory


    Issues in interior design theory are investigated. Written works of designers are analyzed in order to further understanding of the state of contemporary interior design. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENV 140 - Environmental Field Studies


    This course will introduce students to environmental data collection, data management and ecosystem monitoring techniques. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their understanding of the scientific method by investigating the many ecosystems that make up the Endicott Campus. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ENV 332 - Environmental Health


    An examination of the interrelationships between humans and their environment, focusing on health problems due to biological and chemical contaminants in food, water, and air, as well as community exposure to hazardous substances such as lead and other toxins. Topics also include risk assessments, methods used to measure and monitor environmental exposures, and measures undertaken to prevent and control health impacts including standards, regulations and legislation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Formerly SCN 332.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HST 380 - Environmental History


    Examines how the environment has shaped history and how human enterprise has impacted the natural world. Course surveys early European attitudes towards nature, but focuses primarily on the United States: Native Americans’ relationship with nature; the significance of private property and the frontier; and the environmental consequences of the scientific revolution, industrialization, urbanization, and modern consumer culture. Topics include the history of public parks, water supplies, and sanitation systems in American cities, and the rise of the modern environmental movement. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENV 210 - Environmental Issues


    Environmental changes and consequences that accompany anthropogenic development and industrialization will be discussed. The student will actively participate in a chronological and systematic investigation of the connections and relationships between ecological systems, energy, raw materials, western industrialization, environmental degradation, and third world population. The content of the course will ultimately serve to establish an historical reference point which will allow for analysis of current environmental status and national policy.  Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    POL 384 - Environmental Law


    Examines environmental legislation, enforcement provisions, and criminal sanction for environmental violations. The social, political and historical context of the development of environmental laws, their enforcement and impact will also be included. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status or permission of the instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    POL 380 - Environmental Politics


    After the ideological wars of the 20th century, environmental issues today increasingly determine politics. From global warming to pollution to the militaristic competition over diminishing resources, ecology has critical implications for domestic and foreign policy alike. This course examines the interaction of politics and the environment on a local, national, and global scale. It will consider the environmental impact of specific policies and the response of state, non-state and intergovernmental actors. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENV 220 - Environmental Science


    Relationships between the living and nonliving components of Arctic, Tropical and temperate ecosystems are discovered and compared. Effects of global and local occurrences on the origin and distribution of species and modern practices of conservation are emphasized. The laboratory includes campus field work and local field trips. Prior science preferred but not required. Satisfies Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 130 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PHL 104 - Ethics


    What is a good life?  What factors should shape the ethical decisions we make?  And how do ethics relate to artistic, intellectual, and social aspects of our lives? This course studies and debates classical and modern ethical theories, through philosophical and literary texts. It then brings these theories into conversation with a range of contemporary ethical issues, from punishment to medical ethics to the environment.  Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PE 303 - Evaluation and Assessment in Physical Education


    Students will learn to assess and evaluate student achievement in their physical, intellectual and emotional development and to assess their students’ awareness and appreciation about choices that they can make to enhance their overall health. Students will also learn how to read the research literature in physical education and utilize this body of knowledge to cultivate their own professional development.  Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirment.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AT 301 - Evaluation of Injury I


    An intensive study of the assessment techniques utilized in the evaluation of athletic injuries and illnesses occurring to the lower extremity. Students must be able to apply and demonstrate evaluative skills and their knowledge of anatomy and physiology Related to sports medicine. Management of Specific injuries and illnesses will also be discussed.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    AT 302 - Evaluation of Injury II


    An intensive study of the assessment techniques utilized in the evaluation of athletic injuries and illnesses occurring to the upper extremity. Students must be able to apply and demonstrate evaluative skills and their knowledge of anatomy and physiology Related to sports medicine. Management of Specific injuries and illnesses will also be discussed.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203, SCN 201, SCN 202.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    HTA 318 - Events Management


    Examination of all aspects of on-and-off premises catering. Emphasis is placed on the operational components of a catering business. Students are involved in the preparation and presentation of catered functions.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HTA 372 - Events Risk Management


    Risk is an inherent factor anytime people gather for an event. From a supervisory perspective, risk will be analyzed, evaluated, and assessed, from both a proactive and post crisis posture. Focus will be directed at creating and maintaining a secure environment for all stakeholders connected with the event. A critical understanding of how each venue requires its own unique parameters for risk management will be explored.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AT 215 - Exercise Physiology


    An examination of various physiological processes and the effect acute exercise bouts, long term conditioning, and ergogenic aids have on them. Current research in exercise science will be relied upon heavily to help students keep abreast of this ever-changing field. Satisfies the Math and Science and Writing Designated core requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 201, PE 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CMM 338 - Feature Writing


    Examines feature writing through reading texts containing feature stories and current newspapers and magazines. Develops skills in feature writing employing both literary and traditional news gathering techniques to create original stories. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENG 211 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 345 - Fiction and Poetry Seminar


    Students choose to write either fiction or poetry or both, and will strive to create work that has a vivid use of imagery and language and a consistent voice and theme. Students will read selected work by other authors. Each student will put together a chapbook of his or her own work. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENG 208, ENG 209, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CMM 110 - Field Production


    An introduction to the techniques of single camera field production. Topics include camera operation and shot composition, pre-production planning, field lighting and audio, and basic linear editing. The theory and practice of field production are demonstrated through practical applications.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 241 - Figure Drawing: Anatomy for Artists


    Artists and designers explore gesture, axis, and dynamics of the human form through drawing and painting. Life drawing, portraiture, and occupational studies are subject matter to be explored utilizing pencil, charcoal, pastel, and water-based paints. The human figure is examined from scientific, social and artistic perspectives, and includes issues of representation. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 210 - Finance


    An introduction to finance including organization, taxes, capital markets, the commercial banking system, interest rates, financial analysis, financial forecasting, working capital management, marketable securities, accounts receivables, inventories, and short term credit markets. Students will use financial computers and/or software applications to apply concepts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 151.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 170 - Financial Analysis


    Highlights the financial concepts needed to support management decision-making. Students are exposed to the elements of financial statements, with particular emphasis on the fundamental principles that guide financial reporting. The course also focuses on measurement issues that managers must understand to make good financial decisions. This course is for non-business majors only.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BUS 375 - Financial Modeling


    Combines knowledge of financial theory, mathematics, Excel and Visual Basic Applications (VBA) to develop simple to sophisticated spreadsheet models in several major areas of finance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    MTH 200 - Finite Mathematics


    Concentrates on logic and problem-solving techniques including algebra of sets, relation and equivalence, Venn diagrams, scheduling, and game theory. Other topics include matrix arithmetic, systems of equations and linear programming. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Four years of high school math.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PE 110 - First Aid and Safety


    This course is designed to expose students to the cognitive and applied principles of first aid and safety. Students will learn the techniques of basic life support (cardiopulmonary resuscitation), basic first aid and demonstrate them proficiently by American Heart Association Standards. Other topics include discussions on prudent living and treating various medical emergencies.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    FYE 101 - First Year Experience


    This course addresses the challenges of incoming students and provides strategies for success in an academic community. The course assists students in the development of knowledge pertaining to social skills, academic resources, the Endicott mission and traditions, Endicott policies and procedures and the meaning of a college education. Students are encouraged to reflect on both their own development and methods for contributing to the community.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    Students with 24 or more transfer credits may have the FYE 101 requirement waived, but must substitute an additional one credit of coursework.

    (Cr: 1)
  
  •  

    PE 371 - Fitness Across the Lifespan


    Demonstrates how physical educators can cultivate in their physical education students an understanding and appreciation for the concept of lifelong fitness. Students will be asked to construct learning and assessment activities that enhance the wellness of the whole person: intellectually, affectively, and physically. Activity content for student micro teaching will include strength training, Relaxation, yoga, and cardiovascular activities.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PE 370 - Fitness Sampler


    This course is designed to start a student on the path to healthy living by exposing them to the following fitness concepts: Yoga (four weeks), Step Aerobics (four weeks), Weight Training (four weeks) and Health and Wellness (two weeks).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Can be repeated for up to 3 credits.

    (Cr: 1)
  
  •  

    ACC 450 - Forensic Accounting


    Instills knowledge of the nature, prevention and detection of financial statement fraud. Various aspects of fraud prevention and detection are covered, including the sociology of fraud, elements of fraud, types of fraud relating to accounting information, use of control to prevent fraud, and methods of fraud detection.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 350.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PSY 318 - Forensic Psychology


    This course will examine in depth four areas of psychology as these apply to the law and criminal justice. The areas of concentration are psychology and the courtroom; psychology and the criminal; psychology and the victim; and psychology and the law enforcement agent.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY100.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CHE 230 - Forensic Science


    An introduction to forensic science. This course will give the student an understanding of the scientific method and cover the topics of physical evidence, crime scenes, microscopic fiber analysis, forensic serology, DNA as a scientific tool, finger printing, ballistics, and firearm analysis. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 102 or CHE 105, or permission of instructor.  Formerly SCN 230.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 123 - Foundation Seminar


    Introduces students to the conceptual aspects of art production. Models cross-discipline learning in the Division of Art and Design through intense investigation of four main areas: aesthetics, history, practice, and theory. Subtopics include the ethics of the art world, materials and techniques, and interdisciplinary applications to art making.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 115 - Foundations of Design


    This course examines the fundamental principles of two-dimensional design, including the formal elements of composition and visual organization: rhythm, balance, repetition, emphasis, variety, massing, weight, scale, and value. Additionally, students will be introduced to essential elements of color theory, and explore the interrelationship between form and content. This course provides a functional and theoretical base for advanced study of art and design.
     


    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HTA 101 - Foundations of Hospitality and Tourism I


    Introduction to the field of hospitality, emphasizing the development of the industry, evaluating the industry of today and forecasting future trends. Departments of hotels, restaurants and travel organizations will be considered individually and in relationship to each other.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 232 - Foundations of Jazz


    A study of the roots of jazz music in America, the major characteristics of the genre, and the historical developments that led to the jazz movement of the 1920’s. The impact of jazz on contemporary music will also be explored. The class will have an experiential component enabling students to integrate jazz principles with practice. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with MUS 230.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    MUS 230 - Foundations of Jazz


    A study of the roots of jazz music in America, the major characteristics of the genre, and the historical developments that led to the jazz movement of the 1920’s. The impact of jazz on contemporary music will also be explored. The class will have an experiential component enabling students to integrate jazz principles with practice. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with AMS 232

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PE 101 - Foundations of Pedagogy


    Provides a framework for students to explore how teachers and students construct their learning and the types of learning environments that can be cultivated. The components of this framework include: the historical context of education, defining the philosophy of education, the science and art of teaching, the organization and culture of education, and the ethical dimensions of educational decision making. Students will utilize observation instruments to analyze physical educators practicing in public and private school settings with an emphasis on the seven legal duties of a physical education teacher.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ED 201 - Foundations of Reading


    Topics covered in the course develop students’ knowledge of the reading process including emergent literacy, phonics, word recognition, vocabulary development, comprehension, and study skills. Students will learn the major approaches and materials used in teaching reading skills as recommended in the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 101, ED 106 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ED 020 - Foundations of Reading Lab


    A test preparation program for the Foundations of Reading test of the MTEL, this lab focuses on the reading instruction content and test-taking strategies necessary to pass this portion of the MTEL. Required of all Elementary and Early Childhood students.

    (Cr: 0)
  
  •  

    MSL 202 - Foundations of Tactical Leadership


    Cadets examine the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex contemporary operating environment (COES).  The course highlights dimensions of terrain anaylsis, patrolling, and operation orders.  Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations.

    (Cr: 0.0)
  
  •  

    FR 220 - French Film and Fiction


    In this course, taught in French, students will read French short stories and watch French films. They will discuss and analyze both with respect to theme, character, plot, and other literary devices. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    At least one year of college French or equivalent.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PHY 109 - Fundamentals of Astronomy I


    A comprehensive approach to past and current astronomy. Astronomy I covers early astronomy; the distribution, properties and structure of stars and their life cycles; and our galaxy. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One year high school algebra or permission of instructor.  Formerly SCN 109.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    PHY 110 - Fundamentals of Astronomy II


    The approach and format of this course are the same as in Astronomy I. Specific topics included in Astronomy II are the solar system, current space exploration, and other galaxies. PHY 109 and PHY 110 may be taken in either order of sequence. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One year high school algebra or permission of instructor.  Formerly SCN 110.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    HTA 255 - Fundamentals of Events


    Students will explore and develop an understanding of the events/entertainment field. The focus is on the historical development, organizational structure and career opportunities that exist within the discipline. The course introduces students to the methods and techniques utilized in planning organizing and delivering events.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    MUS 110 - Fundamentals of Music


    An introduction to music covering basic musical elements, notation, instruments, form structures, and historical periods, with emphasis on developing listening ability, and exploring the creative and expressive aspects of music. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    NU 210 - Fundamentals of Nursing


    The role of the professional nurse is analyzed focusing on current nursing practice. The nursing process is the organizing framework for planning, delivering, and evaluating nursing care. Concepts of wellness, health promotion, and safety are explored for adult and older adult clients. Discussion of alternative options to achieve client goals is encouraged in class and clinical to further develop critical thinking skills. Students develop psychomotor skills in guided nursing laboratory sessions. Clinical experiences are offered in long-term care settings in the community.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SCN 201, SCN 202, PSY 110. Corequisite: NU 230. Open to majors only.

    (Cr: 8)
  
  •  

    LST 310 - Gender, Women, and Science


    This course will explore the relationship between gender and science through four foci. The first is the history of women as scientists, including women in the medical and nontraditional sciences. The second focus is on the current and historical scientific images of women through the studies of gender, of the two sexes, and of women as reproductive beings. The third focus is on the society of the scientific community and its effect on the membership, the image, and the teaching of science. The final focus is on science as a philosophy, or manner of thinking. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CHE 105 - General Chemistry I


    This course introduces inorganic, organic, and biochemistry, with emphasis on the life sciences, and includes the chemical basis for the most important body process. No previous knowledge of chemistry is assumed. The laboratories cover the most basic and important techniques of chemical analysis, such as titration and pH determination, and introduce the student to chemical processes. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    High school chemistry and algebra or permission of instructor.  Formerly SCN 105.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    CHE 106 - General Chemistry II


    The real world is made up of chemicals and runs on chemical processes. This course surveys the impact on our lives of chemistry in both world-wide issues (such as the ozone hole and global warning) and the personal (such as nutrition, legal and illegal drugs, and aging). The emphasis is on discussion of issues, not chemical equations. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHE 105 or equivalent. Formerly SCN 106.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    PSY 100 - General Psychology


    Foundations for understanding human behavior. Study of the brain and nervous system, sensation and perception, motivation, learning, maturation and development, personality theory, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, and social psychology. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BIO 311 - Genes and Genomes


    This course will focus on the power and importance of genetic information.  Classical genetics (DNA structure and replication, gene expression, how inherited genes and how gene mutations affect us) will be covered.  Genomics, which is the study of the complete genetics makeup of an organism, will be focal.  Understanding an organism’s genome can lead to cures for diseases, helps in forensic analyses, and provides insight into all life forms on earth, including pathogens that threaten our existence.  ELSI (ethical, legal and social issues) related to the Human Genome Project will be discussed.  Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
      BIO 102 and BIO 103, or permission of instructor and dean. Formerly SCN 311.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    AMS 203 - Geography of North America


    An in-depth examination of the physical, cultural, human and economic patterns of North America as they relate to specific geographic and political regions. The course includes related cartography projects. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with GEO 203.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    GEO 203 - Geography of North America


    An in-depth examination of the physical, cultural, human and economic patterns of North America as they relate to specific geographic and political regions. The course includes related cartography projects. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with AMS 203.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENV 122 - Geology


    Examines the basic understanding of the history and principles of physical geology and how it affects human civilization. Internal and external structures of the earth as well as geological, physical, and human processes that create structural changes will be explored. Laboratory skills apply lecture topics to field experiences. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.  Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Formerly SCN 122.

     

    (Cr: 4)

  
  •  

    BUS 350 - Global Marketing Management


    Focus is on the unique problems associated with managing marketing operations across national borders. Topics include: the impact of culture on the global marketing environment; how to identify global market opportunities for an existing enterprise or a new venture; how to apply industry analysis, assessment of risk, and new customer identification techniques in an international context; and how to develop and implement effective comprehensive marketing strategies on a global scale.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CMM 315 - Global Mass Communication


    This class will introduce students to the history and current state of globalization in the mass media. Issues to be addressed include: the promises and problems of a highly interconnected world, debates around “Cultural Imperialism” and “Cultural Resistance,” and the ways in which mass media can be used in governmental/nongovernmental programs that seek to foster social change.  Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HST 251 - God’s Country: Religion in American Life


    An introduction to religion in the United States, from Native American religions and European-Indian contact in the colonial era, to present-day movements and ideas. The course will explore a variety of themes in American religious history, such as slavery and religion, politics and religion, evangelicalism, fundamentalism, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam in the United States, “cults” and alternative spiritualities, New Age religions, and religion and popular culture, with an emphasis on the impact of gender, race, and national culture on American spiritual life.  Satisifes the Arts and Humanities core requirement.



    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with REL 251.

    (Cr: 3)

  
  •  

    REL 251 - God’s Country: Religion in American Life


    An introduction to religion in the United States, from Native American religions and European-Indian contact in the colonial era, to present-day movements and ideas. The course will explore a variety of themes in American religious history, such as slavery and religion, politics and religion, evangelicalism, fundamentalism, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam in the United States, “cults” and alternative spiritualities, New Age religions, and religion and popular culture, with an emphasis on the impact of gender, race, and national culture on American spiritual life.  Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with HST 251.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ENG 260 - Gothic Literature


    Gothic Literature introduces students to the concepts, critical theories and principal texts of the Gothic movement from the late 18th Century to the late 20th Century. Students will read a variety of novels and short stories which exemplify the Gothic genre, and study a selection of critical documents which explain and account for the enduring popularity of this compelling literary movement. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HMS 435 - Group Therapy: Theory and Practice


    Psychotherapeutic techniques used in small groups and large-group interventions, including reviews of the current research, legal, and ethical issues associated with paraprofessional and professional practice. Students will participate in one intensive all day group experience. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100 and PSY 335. Crosslisted with PSY 435.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PSY 435 - Group Therapy: Theory and Practice


    Psychotherapeutic techniques used in small groups and large-group interventions, including reviews of the current research, legal, and ethical issues associated with paraprofessional and professional practice. Students will participate in one intensive all day group experience. 


    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100, PSY 335. Crosslisted with HMS 435.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    NU 230 - Health Assessment


    Students use interviewing skills while collecting complete and focused health histories. The physical examination skills of inspection, palpation, percussion, auscultation and selected measurement techniques are used to assess major body systems of clients across the age continuum. The analysis of data using functional health patterns, clinical assessment tools, diagnostic reasoning and critical thinking skills enhance the students ability to define and describe a client’s current state of health including recognition of selected deviations from normal. Students practice assessment skills in nursing laboratory.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 201, BIO 202, or RN status. Corequisite: NU 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PSY 350 - History and Systems of Psychology


    The historical and philosophical antecedents of modern day psychology will be traced. Eastern as well as Western thought will be examined in order to fully appreciate the foundations of contemporary systems of psychology such as Behaviorism, Psychodynamic, Gestalt and Humanism.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100, PSY 220 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 217 - History of Architecture and Interior Design I


    A history of Western European and American architecture and interior design to the late 18th century, including appropriate background in ancient, medieval, Renaissance and oriental forms and styles. Domestic architecture and interiors and their furniture will be emphasized. Periods covered from dynastic Egypt to European and American Neo-Classical styles. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 313 - History of Architecture and Interior Design II


    A history of Western European and American architecture and interior design from the late 18th century, including appropriate references in ancient, medieval, Renaissance and oriental forms and styles. Domestic architecture and interiors and their furniture will be emphasized. Periods covered from American Neo-Classical through the 21st century (1790–2002). Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Formerly ART 218.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 303 - History of Modern Design


    Theories and practices of visual design will be investigated within the ecological complex of population, technology, social organization, culture, and physical environment. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 317 - History of Photography


    Surveys the history and development of photography worldwide from the 1830s to the present. Examines technical developments and implications, genres, and subjects such as documentary, portrait, and landscape. Themes, such as Modernism’s and Postmodernism’s effects on photographic praxis and perception, are also explored.  Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    MUS 111 - History of Western Music


    A survey of the history of music of Western Civilization from the third century to the present with emphasis on important composers and evolution of musical style within historical periods. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MUS 110 or by permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HON 350 - Honors Seminar


    Focusing on different themes each year, the seminar enables students to explore concepts and ideas across academic disciplines through readings, writing assignments, discussions, class presentations and guest lectures by faculty and outside speakers. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Social Science core requirements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HON 100 - Honors Seminar I


    A foundational seminar for honors students which examines the concept of “culture” from a range of perspectives drawn from the field of cultural studies.  Students will read and interpret cultural texts, examine the culture of their academic discipline, and engage in field-based activities that apply theory to practice.  High standards of academic reading, writing, and discussion are expected throughout the course, and students will be asked to complete substantial papers, presentations, and research projects

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Acceptance in the Endicott Scholars Program.  Meets the LST 100 Seminar in Academic Inquiry core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HON 150 - Honors Seminar II


    Building on the foundation started in HON 100, this course asks students to apply their understanding of culture to a range of cultural settings, materials, and practices. Students will continue to read and interpret cultural texts, examine the culture of their academic discipline, and engage in field-based activities that apply theory to practice. High standards of academic reading, writing, and discussion are expected throughout the course, and students will be asked to complete substantial papers, presentations, and/or research projects. A learning portfolio assessing intellectual growth throughout HON 100 and HON 150 will be completed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Participation in the Endicott Scholars Program and HON 100.  Meets the ENG 101 College Writing Seminar core requirement. 

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HON 200 - Honors Seminar III


    For students who join the Endicott Scholars program after their freshman year, this course examines the concept of “culture” from a range of perspectives drawn from the field of cultural studies. Students will read and interpret cultural texts, examine the culture of their academic discipline, and engage in field-based activities that apply theory to practice. High standards of academic reading, writing, and discussion are expected throughout the course, and students will be asked to complete substantial papers, presentations, and research projects. 


    Prerequisites & Notes
    Acceptance in the Endicott Scholars Program.   Students may not enroll in this class if they have completed either HON 100 or HON 150.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HTA 116 - Hospitality Financial Accounting


    Fundamentals of accounting as it relates to the hospitality industry. Emphasizes the understanding of guest accounts, journals, controls and reporting procedures, as well as the preparation of financial statements.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HTA 360 - Hospitality Legal Perspectives


    An exploration of the potential legal liability of hospitality managers in contract and agency relationships. Topics include the impact of government regulations and their Relationship to management responsibilities in the hospitality industry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior year hospitality students or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HTA 225 - Hospitality Management Accounting


    Examination of control techniques, financial analysis and pricing decisions for the hospitality industry. Emphasis is placed on revenue enhancement, cost control/reduction and effective decision making by the use of timely, accurate and meaningful accounting information.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HTA 116.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HTA 374 - Hospitality Organizational Behavior


    This course will explore the fundamental components of organizational behavior through a comprehensive investigation of supervisory models within the hospitality industry.  Using an examination of industry practitioners, readings and text, students will construct various conceptual frameworks to comprehend and lead hospitality organizations.  Students will also explore the foundations of formulating an in-depth research topic to carry over to the Senior Thesis course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Formerly HTA 220.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HTA 415 - Hospitality Strategic Management


    A course in which students are given the opportunity to apply their academic and work experience to management situations in the hospitality industry. Decision making and problem solving in the area of human resources, marketing, financial analysis and operations are addressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior year status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    BIO 101 - Human Biology


    An introduction to the science of biology by exploring human anatomy and physiology. Students will relate the major systems of the body to maintaining their own bodies in a healthy state. The impact of current health issues on the human body will be discussed. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Cannot be taken by students who have taken BIO 201 and/or BIO 202.  Formerly SCN 101.

    (Cr: 4)
  
  •  

    BUS 305 - Human Resource Management


    This course examines employee-employer Relationships in the work place today. Policy areas covered are: job design, recruiting, employee selection, placement, job training and career development, performance evaluation, compensation strategies, incentives and benefits. There is also discussion of current economic situations as they impact the work place today, including labor/management relations.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    POL 430 - Human Rights


    The history, theory, and defense of human rights from their articulation in the 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration to the present will be the focus of this course. In-depth case studies of human rights violations around the world will provide the basis for examining the legal and philosophical basis for human rights, as well as the function of both political and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in their implementation and defense. The practical aspects of the topic will be stressed through guest lectures, site visits, teleconferencing, and direct action/service learning.  Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One social science course or permission of the instructor.  Formerly POL 330.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PSY 325 - Human Sexuality


    Cultural and biological aspects of human sexuality with an emphasis on understanding diversity in interpersonal relations. The course will also provide opportunities for self understanding as it relates to one’s sexuality and interpersonal relationships. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100 or BIO 101. Warning: Students should possess a readiness for open and respectful discussion of course themes.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    IST 220 - Ideas, Culture, and Social Thought


    Examination and analysis of the notion of culture as it is defined in complex contexts in which power relations, economic and Political interests, and ideological practices play a crucial role. Special emphasis will be placed on the distinction between ideas and ideologies, the critique of the persistence of myths in modern rationalizations of social practices, and the consideration of the notion of the self as a socially constructed entity. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHL 100 or PHL 104 or permission of instructor.  Crosslisted with PHL 220.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    PHL 220 - Ideas, Culture, and Social Thought


    Examination and analysis of the notion of culture as it is defined in complex contexts in which power relations, economic and political interests, and ideological practices play a crucial role. Special emphasis will be placed on the distinction between ideas and ideologies, the critique of the persistence of myths in modern rationalizations of social practices, and the consideration of the notion of the self as a socially constructed entity. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHL 100 or PHL 104 or permission of instructor.  Crosslisted with IST 220.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    LST 303 - Images of Women


    An investigation of the ways in which women are seen in the world today, this course draws its content from literature, Speeches, advertising, and other forms of mass communication. Study of traditional images of women in both eastern and western cultures contributes to an understanding of the origin and basis of gender roles. Self-imaging and self empowerment are significant components of this course. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One core humanities or social science course.

    (Cr: 3)
 

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