Jan 28, 2022  
2007-2008 Undergraduate Academic Catalog 
    
2007-2008 Undergraduate Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    MTH 135 - Calculus I


    This course offers an introduction to differential and integral calculus of the single variable. The course includes the study of limits and continuity, the mean value theorem, techniques of differentiation including the chain rule, optimization, and the fundamental theorem of calculus, antiderivatives and introductory integrals and their applications. Properties of transcendental functions (exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric) are explored using calculus. A knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is assumed. Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    High school pre-calculus or MTH 128.  Cannot be taken by students who have taken MTH 136.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    MTH 136 - Calculus II


    This course is a continuation from MTH135. It reviews the Fundamental Theorem of calculus, antiderivatives and definite integrals to the techniques of differential and integral calculus. Further concepts of integration, and their applications to finding arc lengths, areas, volumes, and density, are explored. Applications explored include social, physical and life sciences.  The use of integral tables, partial differentiation, the method of least squares, and sequences and series are also studied.  Satisfies Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH135.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    NU 211 - Care of Adults


    Students are introduced to the holistic care of adults experiencing medical/surgical conditions requiring hospitalization in the acute care setting. Content is introduced in class discussion; clinical experiences and conferences reinforce concepts presented in class. The nursing process is used as the organizing framework in the delivery, and evaluation of nursing care aimed at restoring and maintaining the client’s optimal state of health. Students will have an observation experience in the operating room with an opportunity to meet the surgical patient preoperatively, observe surgery, and accompany the patient through immediate recovery.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 210. Corequisite: NU 286.

    (Cr: 8)
  
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    NU 313 - Care of Childbearing Families


    Basic knowledge and skills underlying the care of families during childbearing are presented. Students develop beginning skills in applying the nursing process to the care of families during pregnancy, birthing, recovery, and transition home. Nursing students are expected to exercise critical thinking during clinical decision making, use therapeutic communication skills, and provide therapeutic nursing interventions in selected facilities and community settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 210, NU 211, NU 286, NU 230.

    (Cr: 5)
  
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    NU 314 - Care of Children


    Students build on previous knowledge of growth and development, and pathophysiology to assess, plan and implement safe and developmentally appropriate nursing interventions to children from birth through adolescence. Rich clinical experiences in both hospital-based and community settings provide opportunities to strengthen communication skills with children and families from diverse backgrounds. Classroom analysis of specific case studies encourage peer review as a method to stimulate critical thinking.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 210, NU 211, NU 286, NU 230.

    (Cr: 5)
  
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    BIO 320 - Cell and Molecular Biology


    A study of the cellular, sub cellular, and molecular components associated with cell structure, cell function, and cell regulation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Mechanisms including bioenergetics, cell signaling, cell cycle, development, and cancer will be emphasized. Key experiments in various aspects of the field will be explored. The laboratory experience emphasizes techniques associated with cell culture, protein analysis, DNA analysis, immunology, and bioinformatics.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.  Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 102 or BIO 130 or BIO 201 or CHE 105.  Formerly SCN 320.

    (Cr: 4)
  
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    ART 121 - Ceramics I


    An appreciation of the craft is developed through an understanding of the basic methods and techniques of designing and creating with clay as a medium. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 222 - Ceramics II


    Continuing the concept of developing advanced design techniques through wheelwork, hand-building and sculptural forms.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 121.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    MUS 114 - Chamber Ensemble


    The course work will include maturity of classical styles and repertoire in the structure of a chamber ensemble. Duos, trios, quartets and quintets are formed depending on available players. Students will develop musicianship skills, including instrumental methods and small group recital expertise. Participants will perform arrangements in a variety of classical styles, by historical and contemporary composers. Biweekly rehearsals will culminate in performances. Ensembles rehearse a minimum of two times per week in addition to scheduled class times, and are coached by a faculty member. The faculty member establishes the number of performances when the group is formed. Can be repeated for up to three credits which will fulfill one Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  
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    CHE 306 - Chemical Analysis and Instrumentation


    An examination of environmentally significant analytes utilizing techniques commonly used in air, soil, and water analysis including wet chemistry techniques and instrumental analysis. Topics covered will include mass spectrometry, electroanalytical chemistry, chromatographic separations, atomic absorption spectrometry and emission spectroscopy.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHE 105, CHE 106.  Formerly SCN 306.

    (Cr: 4)
  
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    PSY 200 - Child and Adolescent Psychology


    A basis for understanding behavioral and psychological development of the child from conception through adolescence. Examines theory and research pertaining to personality and social and cognitive development. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100 or permission of the instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PSY 204 - Child Growth and Development


    This course covers child development from prenatal to age six. The course examines major child development theories, states of growth, and interrelated aspects of physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and language development. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Cannot be taken by students who have taken PSY200.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CMM 310 - Children’s Television


    A survey of the history and progression of children’s television that examines the content of children’s programming and advertising, the impact and effects of television on children, and media literacy. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    SP 331 - Cinema of Latin American


    Students will develop their communicative competencies in Spanish and deepen their knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world by discussing and analyzing films from Latin America. Films will be in Spanish with English subtitles, but group discussion and individual writing assignments about the films will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 202 or permission of the instructor.

     


    (Cr: 3)
  
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    AMS 317 - Civil Rights Movement


    A survey of the unique set of events, circumstances and struggles that shaped the U.S. in the 1950’s and 60’s collectively known as the Civil Rights Movement. This course offers an analytical examination of the freedom movement which continues to this day by looking at the African-American struggle for freedom, justice and equality beginning in 1954 with the historic Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision to the present. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with HST 317.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    HST 317 - Civil Rights Movement


    A survey of the unique set of events, circumstances and struggles that shaped the U.S. in the 1950’s and 60’s collectively known as the Civil Rights Movement. This course offers an analytical examination of the freedom movement which continues to this day by looking at the African-American struggle for freedom, justice and equality beginning in 1954 with the historic Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision to the present. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with AMS 317.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ED 339 - Classroom Assessment


    Methods and techniques of evaluation and assessment in education are the focus of this course. Emphasis will be given to the development of educational standards, design of performance-based assessments, and fair scoring of those assessments.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 101, ED 220 or permission of instructor and junior year status.  Formerly PSY 300.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    AT 200 - Clinical Education Experience


    A sophomore clinical education experience under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer in an approved setting. Emphasis is placed on prevention and management of injury. Students will gain experience with individual and team sports. All clinical placements are at the discretion of the Chair of Athletic Training. Includes a minimum hour/day requirement and weekly lecture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 101.

    (Cr: 2)
  
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    AT 201 - Clinical Education Experience


    A sophomore year clinical education experience under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer at an approved setting. Emphasis is placed on recognition and management of common athletic injuries and illnesses. All clinical placements are at the discretion of the Chair of Athletic Training. Includes a minimum hour/day requirement and weekly lecture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 200.

    (Cr: 2)
  
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    AT 402 - Clinical Education Experience


    Emphasis is placed on refining evaluative and rehabilitative skills and expanding the students’ experiences outside of the traditional primary setting. All clinical placements must be approved by the Chair of Athletic Training. Includes a minimum hour/day requirement and weekly lecture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 311.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    AT 480 - Clinical Education Experience


    A semester long clinical education experience under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer at an approved setting. Emphasis is placed on refinement and demonstration of clinical skills in prevention, evaluation , management, rehabilitation, and administration. Formal seminars are included to strengthen and evaluate clinical skills and professional competencies. All students will be placed at the discretion of the Chair of Athletic Training.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 301, AT 302, AT 305, AT 307.

    (Cr: 12)
  
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    PE 400 - Coaching Practicum


    Students demonstrate competence in planning, implementing and evaluating athletic practices and contests. A monitored practicum in which students serve as assistant or head coaches of interscholastic teams.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PE 110, PE 201, PE 208, PE 210.

    (Cr: 1)
  
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    ENG 101 - College Writing Seminar


    This course introduces freshmen to prewriting, composing, and revising strategies. It emphasizes logical development of ideas in papers appropriate to purpose and audience. Students will draw on their own experiences but will be asked to see beyond them and to respect the weight of evidence. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 207 - Color Theory and Light


    An investigation in the physics and application of color, and how artists and designers control colors’ many characteristics. Students learn how colors interact and affect each other, and how to apply this knowledge to many aspects of art and design. The course ascertains why humans prefer certain colors and color combinations. The historical foundations for color usage are examined. Satisfies Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART105 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CMM 370 - Communication Research Methods


    Students will learn the research and analysis tools they need to be successful in the required senior courses: Thesis I and II.  This course covers social scientific quantitative and qualitative research skills and critical/cultural analysis forms used by Communication  Scholars.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ED 010 - Communication/Literacy Lab


    A test preparation program for the Communication and Literacy Skills test of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL), this lab focuses on and provides hands-on practice with the critical reading, writing, and test-taking skills necessary to pass this portion of the MTEL. Required of all students in Elementary, Early Childhood, and Physical Education programs.

    (Cr: 0)
  
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    HST 301 - Communism, Fascism and Democracy


    Analysis and comparison of the major ideological movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. The course goes on to analyze 19th century “Liberalism,” the Utopian Socialists, Marx and Engels, Lenin and Trotsky, the “Revisionists,” the Fabian and Christian Socialists, Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One core social science course.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CJ 320 - Community Corrections


    The historical and conceptual development of community corrections in the United States, including in-depth analysis of probation, parole and other non-institutional forms of correctional intervention are analyzed. Particular attention is given to the structure and function of various community correctional components such as probation, parole, diversion, halfway houses, restitution, and restorative justice programs.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    NU 411 - Community Health Nursing


    This course focuses on fostering health in the community. Cultural, socioeconomic, and epidemiological factors are considered as community specific health problems are identified. Empowering individuals, families and groups to restore and maintain health as well as prevent illness and injury is an integral component of this course. Clinical learning experiences are provided in a variety of community and public health settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 410, senior class status.

    (Cr: 5)
  
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    IST 320 - Comparative Political Models


    Using case studies and comparative analysis, this course examines political institutions and processes worldwide. Historical, socioeconomic, and ideological factors are considered in the development of various Political systems, their interactions and transformations. The role of regional and global institutions and social movements and their effect on the sovereignty of the nation-state will also be considered. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with POL 320.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    POL 320 - Comparative Political Models


    Using case studies and comparative analysis, this course examines political institutions and processes worldwide. Historical, socioeconomic, and ideological factors are considered in the development of various political systems, their interactions and transformations. The role of regional and global institutions and social movements and their effect on the sovereignty of the nation-state will also be considered. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with IST 320.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    MUS 184 - Composing With Software


    This course introduces students to compositional techniques and principles of composition by using music software. Students will write several pieces of music and practice exercises to demonstrate the principles under study. Students increase their skills and polish their work through the strengths and immediacy of playback and editing devices. The course will include lecture and studio settings. Musical proficiency is not required to enroll in this course.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    VC 302 - Computer Animation


    Introduces students to the basic concepts of two and three-dimensional animation while developing a vocabulary and an array of technical skills. An overview of animation history, terminology and output will be explored. Development of storyboards and production of short animations using a variety of software programs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    VC 105, VC 301 preferred, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CSC 170 - Computer Architecture


    This course provides an introduction to computer architecture through the study of microprocessor chips.  Students will develop a basic understanding of computer system architecture (hardware), learn to program embedded computer systems, and learn how I/O devices are controlled by microprocessors.  Lectures and hands on applications will be used to develop understanding of systems concepts.    

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 101.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    VC 301 - Computer Design and Illustration


    An intermediate level course using computers as a tool for visual communication. The creation and display of information, image, and/or text is examined, as well as the ways in which images communicate meaning.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    VC 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    HTA 105 - Concepts of Food and Beverage


    Develops an appreciation of food and wine ingredients in terms of sensory perception, categories and classifications, cultural derivations and quality factors. The cultural influences of wine, grape varieties, and food pairing will be studied through a historical perspective in regard to their increasing importance in today’s hospitality industry.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ID 200 - Construction and Materials I


    Students begin to explore the technical and aesthetic aspects of building structure, environmental systems including plumbing, electrical, HVAC, and acoustics and their impact on the interior architectural environment. The appropriate selection of material and technologies based on codes, Universal Design, function, and aesthetics are explored for interior spaces.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 102, ID 104.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ID 206 - Construction and Materials II


    Students continue to explore the technical and aesthetic aspects of building systems integration and its impact on the interior architectural environment. The appropriate selection and specification of materials, finishes, and furnishings for interior spaces, based upon codes, occupant comfort, function, universal design, and aesthetics are explored at an advanced level.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 101, ID 102, and ID 200.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ID 307 - Construction and Materials III – Lighting and Building Systems


    The principles of interior lighting design and integration of building systems are explored through lectures and studio projects to develop an understanding of design solutions which meet the aesthetic, functional, and regulatory needs of interior architectural spaces.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 202, ID 206, ID 230.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ID 308 - Construction and Materials IV – Contract Documents Studio


    Contract documents are prepared combining knowledge of architectural, structural, environmental systems, interior construction detailing, architectural millwork and furniture design and detailing. Detailing theory and processes are explored and supported by the exploration of material technology, constructions processes, and finish systems research.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 200, ID 206, ID 307 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    BUS 330 - Consumer Behavior


    Study of the consumer as a decision maker. Social and psychological influences on purchasing decisions are examined with emphasis on their implications for retail marketing strategy. Topics include: external and internal influences on consumer lifestyles, the nature of consumer motivation, the purchase decision process as it relates to the consumption of consumer goods and services, and appropriate marketing responses.  Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    HST 201 - Contemporary Approaches to History


    Surveys recent trends in historical research and writing and analyzes the contested nature of history and collective memory in contemporary society. Using models of scholarship on history in the United States and abroad, the course will examine the kinds of evidence and prisms (e.g. politics, race, gender, nation, culture) historians use to interpret the past and the kinds of history (e.g. narrative, comparative, biographical) they write. Required of all history majors and minors, but open to any interested students. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 316 - Contemporary Art History


    Investigates the history of and issues in contemporary art making.  Surveys art movements since 1945 and exposes students to various methodological and theoretical issues, such as recent debates on identity politics, multiculturalism, and pluralism, in contemporary arts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Art 101, Art 102, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    LST 308 - Contemporary Issues


    Examination and analysis of the critical issues and events of our contemporary world. The issues are approached through lecture, readings in current literature, the news media and classroom discussion.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One core social science course.  Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CMM 301 - Contemporary Issues in Advertising


    Students will be exposed to “hot issues” facing advertising professionals. They will have the opportunity to study, in-depth, one or more of the techniques or issues driving the advertising industry.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 328 - Contemporary Issues in Art History and Theory


     

     Examines current issues in politics/art and investigates selected subjects with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field. The specific theories, subject matter and techniques to be investigated are dependent upon the topic being considered.

    (Cr: 3)

  
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    HMS 300 - Contemporary Issues in Human Services


    Examines current issues in the human services field and investigates selected subjects with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field. The specific theories, subject matter, and techniques focus on the human services system and how it can be improved. Students will also be required to examine alternatives to the current system and the practicality of their implementation.  Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as course content is new.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HMS 100 and junior year standing or permission of instructor. 

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CMM 300 - Contemporary Issues in Journalism


    Students will gain a perspective on challenges facing contemporary journalism and its practitioners. Social and ethical issues in the age of “wired” journalism will be highlighted. The role of the journalist and how journalism defines “events of the day” will be analyzed from a variety of perspectives.  Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CMM 400 - Contemporary Issues in Media Studies


    This course will explore in depth an area of media studies. Topics and course descriptions will change from semester to semester. Examples of topics may include post-colonial film theory, political communication, or gender studies and media. Students may take more than one section of this course providing the topic is different from one section to the next.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new.  Junior or senior year status.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    POL 300 - Contemporary Issues in Politics


    This course examines current issues in politics, investigating selected subjects with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field. The specific content, theories, approaches, and assignments depend upon the topic being considered. Possible topics may include: elections; constitutional issues; war and foreign policy; state and local issues; specific legislation, policies (i.e. Patriot Act); etc.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    One social science course, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PSY 410 - Contemporary Issues in Psychology


    Examines contemporary issues from varied perspectives within the field of psychology. Students will investigate selected subjects with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100, junior year status, or permission of instructor. Students may take more than one section of this course as long as the course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    SP 211 - Contemporary Spain (Offered in Spain)


    An analysis of the historical reality of Spain from the Civil War and the years of Franco’s regime to the period of economic and social transformation that took place after his death and continues today. The course will also analyse the challenges facing Spain in terms of its position within an enlarging European Union, and its relationship with the United States and Latin America in an era of globalization and wide-reaching technological changes. Taught in English.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    HTA 310 - Convention Sales and Service


    This course is designed to give students practical insight into the different types of meetings and conventions and how to reach and sell to these markets. Emphasis is given to convention service activities that take place after the market has been sold.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    BUS 311 - Corporate Finance


    Examines more advanced topics in finance, including option pricing and the use of options in corporate finance. Students use financial modeling to solve problems in capital budgeting and mergers and acquisitions. In addition, some topics in international finance are covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ACC 425 - Corporate Tax Accounting


    The second course in tax accounting, examines concepts and principles of federal taxation as they apply to business enterprises including proprietorships, partnerships, LLC’s, S corporations and corporations. Topics include: tax policy, tax planning, measuring taxable income, basis and cost recovery, property transactions and the alternative minimum tax.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 325.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CJ 215 - Corrections


    A study of the history and development of the adult correctional system as part of the larger adult criminal justice system. Includes a review and analysis of theories of punishment, a study of institutionalization, alternatives to incarceration, and the roles of convicted offenders and the criminal justice personnel who work with them.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PHY 260 - Cosmology


    The study of the structure and evolution of the astronomical universe (stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, etc.). Some relevant questions are: How large is the universe? What is its structure? How long has it existed? How has it changed over time? How will it continue to change in the distant future? How do we approach these questions? Satisfies the Science and Math core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One semester of college experience.  Formerly SCN 260.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ACC 315 - Cost Accounting


    Provides basic knowledge of costing systems and methods of costing and develops problem solving skills related to cost and management accounting. Topics include cost estimation, elements of cost, inventory planning and control, activity based costing, job and contract costing, process costing, joint product and by-product costing, breakeven analysis and budgeting.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 151.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ED 215 - Creative Arts in the Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms


    This course integrates the use of art, music and drama in the curriculum of today’s Early Childhood and Elementary classroom. The course incorporates the component of a weekly lab, affording students the opportunity to design and present lessons in the creative arts in accordance with current curriculum frameworks.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 209 - Creative Arts Therapy Studio I


    Within a studio setting, students explore the therapeutic aspects of the art experience. Materials and varied artistic media will be explored with the goal of studying their therapeutic effects. In addition, the combined use of artistic media will be examined.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 309 - Creative Arts Therapy Studio II


    An advanced Creative Arts Therapy studio which deepens the student’s understanding of art making in a group setting. The course will explore the psychology of group dynamics, Therapeutic communities, and different therapeutic aspects of group experiences with the arts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 209 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 255 - Creative Bookmaking


    Creating handmade books allows students an aesthetic experience by exploring the traditional instrument for story telling, communication, and record-keeping. Various adhesive and non-adhesive techniques for binding and assembling books will be explored while addressing issues related to papermaking, journaling, and the unique book as multi-dimensional sculpture. The emphasis will be placed on the development of a personal vision, in which students may incorporate in their books a variety of their existing forms of expression, such as graphics, poetry, printmaking, painting and photography. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 115, or ID 102, or permission of instructor.


    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ENG 318 - Creative Non-Fiction


    Offers students the opportunity to explore the art of creative nonfiction and find their own voice as they learn how to craft essays, reflections, memoirs, and short biographies. Class time will be devoted to writing exercises and discussing professional and student writing. Students will also be encouraged to give a public reading of their work. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.
     


    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ENG 209 - Creative Writing: Fiction


    Writing of short stories and one-act plays through which students will come to recognize the elements that combine to create clear, dramatic, specific and truthful works. Writers will read their own works and the works of others to help find their own voice, theme and style. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ENG 208 - Creative Writing: Poetry


    A course designed to give students practice in writing poetry. Its aim is to develop students’ skill and confidence in writing by studying selected examples of good writing. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    CJ 151 - Criminal Law


    A complete review of federal and state criminal statutes with a case analysis approach. Elements of crimes against persons, property and other societal deviations. Intent, limitations, defenses and burden of proof are included.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CJ 301 - Criminal Procedure


    This course focuses on an historical evaluation of the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 14th Amendments and the use of making rights prescribed under the Bill of Rights applicable to the individual states. Inherent problems are detailed as the Constitution applies to police practices, illegal search and seizure, and right to counsel. Precedents are studied for the conclusions reached.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CJ 200 - Criminology


    This course provides an overview of the major criminological theoretical perspectives. It will examine the social, political and intellectual milieu within which each arose. Beginning with 18th and 19th century theories, the course will focus on the sociological, psychological, and political constructions of criminality and their effects on the criminal justice system. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HMS 310 - Crisis Intervention


    The theory and practice of crisis intervention will be the focus of this course. Topics will include suicide intervention, rape crisis counseling, battered women counseling, working with disabilities, and working with the critical incident management model.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HMS 100 and PSY 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 310 - Cross Cultural Practices of Creative Arts Therapy


    An exploration of the archetypal foundations of Creative Arts Therapy practice. Issues of culture will be studied in relation to preferences for particular kinds of activities and different ways of responding to the expressions of others. Universal qualities of artistic languages will also be examined. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 209, ART 309, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    HTA 240 - Culinary Arts Operations


    Focus will be on the production of gourmet quality cuisine preparations and presentation. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of culinary, environmental, cultural and business principles.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    HTA 314 - Cultural and Economic Impact of Tourism


    A study of the underlying principles and practices in domestic and international tourism, including issues of tourism development and marketing. Focus is on the economic, ecological and anthropological impacts of travel and tourism.  Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
  •  

    ART 110 - Cultural and Historic Perspectives in Creative Arts Therapy


    The ancient and contemporary history of creative arts therapy will be synthesized in this introductory course to professional practice. Current standards and future directions for the profession will be based on studies of the healing aspects of the arts. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    SP 205 - Cultural Introduction to Spain (Offered in Spain)


    The study of the culture of Spain helps the student acquire a deep awareness of both the cultural unity and diversity of the people in Spain. Major themes of Spanish culture and thought are presented in historical context and brought to life through guided tours and visits to churches, synagogues, museums, palaces, and many other sites significant to understanding present-day. In addition, survival Spanish and grammar will be introduced according to the student’s level and need. Taught in English.

     

     

     

     

     

    (Cr: 3)

  
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    PSY 307 - Cultural Psychology


    This course examines culture as process. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of culture in various contexts. Particular attention is paid to the relationship of oppression to the formation of cultural identity. Paradigms from black, Asian and indigenous psychology will be included from a developmental perspective.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Six credits in psychology.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CJ 400 - Current Issues in Criminal Justice


    This course will examine current issues in the criminal justice field and investigate selected subjects with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field. The specific theories, subject matter and techniques to be investigated are dependent upon the topic being considered. Possible topics may include: white collar crime, terrorism, computer crime, computers and criminal justice, law and society, civil liabilities of criminal justice personnel or community corrections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ED 106 - Curriculum Frameworks


    The foundation will be the Massachusetts Department of Education’s Common Core of Learning and Curriculum Frameworks. Students will explore these documents individually and collectively in order to understand how the frameworks can be used as guidelines in structuring curriculum and how they can be applied in an integrated classroom.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 330 - Dance Movement and Creative Arts Therapy


    Within a studio setting, students explore the therapeutic and expressive aspects of dance/movement experiences. Theory and application will be studied with the goal of investigating the therapeutic effects of dance/movement therapy in educational, Psychiatric, physical, and rehabilitation settings. Additional creative modalities will be introduced. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CSC 340 - Database Management


    Survey of the basic concepts and theories in data modeling and relational database management. The course covers the development of database applications and solutions to satisfy user needs. In addition, students examine the use of the database in contemporary organizations and explore issues surrounding database access, use, and confidentiality.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 200.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    HMS 230 - Death and Dying


    Students will examine attitudes and practices towards death from an individual, historical and cultural perspective. The social, legal, and ethical implications of dying and death will be explored. The class will also discuss survivors and understanding the experience of loss.


    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with SOC 230.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    SOC 230 - Death and Dying


    Students will examine attitudes and practices towards death from an individual, historical and cultural perspective. The social, legal, and ethical implications of dying and death will be explored. The class will also discuss survivors and understanding the experience of loss.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Formerly SOC 330.  Crosslisted with HMS 230.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    MSL 401 - Developing Adaptive Leaders


    Cadets will develop proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations functioning as a member of a staff, and providing performance feedback to subordinates.  Cadets will assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets.  Lessons on military justice and personnel processes prepare cadets to make the transition to Army officers.

    (Cr: 0.0)
  
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    VC 260 - Digital Imaging and Manipulation


    (formerly Photo Communication) This studio course focuses on using digital photographic images. A variety of computer applications will be used to transform and manipulate images. An understanding of the potential of computer alteration and creation of images will be fostered. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    VC 105 or permission of the instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CMM 361 - Digital Journalism


     This course provides a comprehensive overview of digital journalism, its history, its structure, its economics, its tools, its relationship with society and culture.  Key concepts and theorist in information society, technology, and journalism will be addressed. 

     

     

     

     

    (Cr: 3)

  
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    DRA 310 - Directing


    This course is designed for students who have already received an introduction to theater arts and performance. Students will explore the function of a director from its establishment as an artistic voice in theater production to practical application of directorial concepts. Students will begin with preparing a theoretical approach to staging a play to directing a cutting from a published play.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CMM 372 - Documentary Modes


    An exploration through screenings, readings, and discussion of the history and various modes of documentary film and television, from the Lumiere Brothers to the present day, including expository, verite-based, interactive and self-reflexive styles. Subgenres considered will also include ethnographic approaches, “mockumentary,” and reality TV. By looking closely at a wide range of documentary motion pictures, students will gain new tools for media analysis, historical reference, and production methodology.  Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PHT 218 - Documentary Photography


    This is a hands-on, image making course in which the student will reveal and communicate something of importance of the places and people they encounter. The potential use for private, exhibited, and published use of the images will direct the shooting assignments.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 216.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    CMM 374 - Documentary Production


     An intensive hands-on experience in documentary production.  Considerations include the theory, the mechanics and the aesthetics of creating non-fiction video using the latest digital editing equipment.

     

     

     

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMM255 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)

  
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    CJ 425 - Domestic Violence


    This course will cover the history of domestic violence as a social problem, its dynamics, prevalence, outcomes, research issues, and contemporary domestic violence policy. The course will focus on domestic violence in the United States. The goal of this course is to provide students with a broad understanding of domestic violence, its effects on today’s society and the resources available to address it. The course will also cultivate the knowledge and skills that will allow students to critically evaluate representations of domestic violence in a variety of contexts.



    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with HMS 425

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    HMS 425 - Domestic Violence


    This course will cover the history of domestic violence as a social problem, its dynamics, prevalence, outcomes, research issues, and contemporary domestic violence policy. The course will focus on domestic violence in the United States. The goal of this course is to provide students with a broad understanding of domestic violence, its effects on today’s society and the resources available to address it. The course will also cultivate the knowledge and skills that will allow students to critically evaluate representations of domestic violence in a variety of contexts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with CJ 425.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ENG 303 - Drama Survey


    Survey of the development of drama from the ancient Greeks to the contemporary theater. Students will read works of major playwrights and study theater in terms of culture, theme, style, theory and production. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 105 - Drawing and Composition I


    Foundation-Drawing strategies for visual representation, mark-making, and interpretive skills. Focus on “traditional” still-life, landscape, and figurative sources. Use of black and white charcoal, pencil, inks. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ART 106 - Drawing and Composition II


    Foundation-Drawing emphasis on advanced tasks, skills, and decision-making. Focus on still-life, landscape, figurative, and mediated sources. Use of black and white or color charcoal, pastel, pencil, inks, photos. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PE 301 - Dynamics of Human Movement I


    Students will study the fundamental concepts of musculoskeletal anatomy, biomechanical principles, and movement of the human body. The major foci include understanding the range and quality of functional movements, the actions of levers within the human body, and how muscular contraction affects human movement. Students will incorporate the biomechanical analysis of individual/dual sport skills to teach their peers in a physical education setting in the Sport skills of archery, golf, and badminton.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    PE 302 - Dynamics of Human Movement II


    This course incorporates the biomechanical analysis of lifetime physical activities to teach their peers in a physical education setting and advanced concepts of musculoskeletal anatomy, biomechanical principles, and movement of the human body. Students will incorporate the biomechanical analysis of individual sport skills to teach their peers in a physical education setting in the sport skills of tennis,, in-line skating, racquetball, and track and field.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    BUS 450 - Dynamics of Leadership


    An extensive look at the nature of leadership and the dilemmas facing leaders of people at work. In depth analysis of the forces motivating the behavior of people working in ongoing and temporary groups. Includes problems of authority and influence, development of roles and norms, initiation of change and dealing with resistance. Recognition of women’s and men’s parity in leadership opportunities as a major consideration. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ENG 367 - Eastern Literature and Haiku


    Haiku poetry is the grasp of the essential nature of things. It is what is happening in a place at a moment. The poet describes one moment and one feeling in haiku. By studying how the form of haiku developed through the culture and literature of India, China, and Japan, students will explore how this literature is grounded in Taoism, Buddhism, and Zen Buddhism. We will trace the origins of haiku for a richer understanding of the form. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    REL 245 - Eastern Religions


    An exploration of the histories, central beliefs, and practices of religions originating from India, China, and Japan. The course will probe questions of eastern belief about the Ultimate Reality, human responsibility, experiences of the sacred, the goal of human life, and reincarnation. Satisfies the Arts and Humanities core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    ECN 304 - Economics of the European Union (Offered in Spain)


    An overview of the events that took place from 2002, the year that the Euro was introduced as the  official European currency until 2004 when another ten European nations became member states of the Union.  Students will analyse how this new currency is affecting the economic realities of Europe as well as the rest of the world.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECN 201 and ECN 202.

    (Cr: 3)
  
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    HST 310 - Economies and Peoples


    A broad survey of world economic history from the earliest times to the present. The causes and effects of economic change and expansion will be studied. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Crosslisted with IST 310.

    (Cr: 3)
 

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