Dec 06, 2022  
2019-2020 Van Loan Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Van Loan Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
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    IED 528 - Seminar in Curricular Enrichment for School Transformation


    This course explores the notion of enrichment as key to effective learning cultures and ecologies. The class will study enrichment not as a mere “add-on” or “after school activity” but rather in large part via the thoroughly-researched and time tested “Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM)” approaches. Originally developed at the (US) federally-funded NEAG Center, the SEM has also been written about and practiced in the context of international education, and the course will review relevant international school literature and worldwide manifestations of the approaches. The course will explore Type I, Type II, and Type III enrichment and how to facilitate them. It will explore notions such as the “three ring” conception of talent, curriculum compacting, enrichment clusters, the place of fine arts, and what SEM contributes to ideas such as “differentiation” and “inquiry based instruction.” A special emphasis will be upon contemporary “cutting-edge” expressions of enrichment models and on how these relate to other master’s program themes such as learning ecology, learning culture, and learners choosing their own learning. Educators should leave the course with the skills necessary to bring schoolwide enrichment to their school.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 530 - Linguistics and Language Acquisition


    This course explores phonological and syntactical theory of English and other languages, sociolinguistics, research and theories in first and second language acquisition, and strategies for developing English language skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will also develop an understanding of reading theory, research and practice and the differences between first and second language acquisition in the learning of literacy skills. 

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 540 - Using Technology in ESL Acquisition


    Technology will be examined as instructional tools in the instruction of English as a Second Language (ESL). The technologies will include those appropriate for direct classroom instruction as well as enrichment and the use of mobile and/or personalized technologies appropriate for supporting teaching and learning within the school and home settings. Research specific to technology in pedagogy will form the foundation for the topics covered.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 570 - Clinical Experience in ESL


    This course will examine and appraise international ESL curricula and instructional approaches across all grade levels. It includes a presentation of basic ESL and general curriculum models, with reference to research-supported practices and to formative and summative assessment. The goal of this course is to provide each student with opportunities to make contact with and to implement a broad variety of ESL theories, curricular designs, and successful practices. Coursework will deal with matching specific theories of ESL curriculum development to present practice as found both in the literature and in rich professional experiences available among the course participants. Activities, content, and materials are focused on international curricula, as found in the K-12 international schools in which ESL practitioners from this program will likely work. 

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 571 - Leadership for Technology in Schools


    This course will review theory and research on leadership, the study of organizational culture, and the principles necessary to support change. In addition, this course will lay the foundation for the understanding of effective leadership in allocating human resources, using and developing technology in schools and technology plans and audits. Students will examine and develop strategic planning for technology, develop financial plans, and plans for teacher professional development using technology in their classes and schools. Case studies will be used in this course

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 572 - Clinical Experience


    This course will examine and appraise the international curricula of all grade levels. It includes a presentation of basic curriculum models with reference to research-supported practices and to formative and summative assessment. The goal of this course is to provide each student with opportunities to make contact with and to implement a broad variety of curriculum theory, curricular designs, and successful practices. Coursework will deal with matching specific theories of curriculum development to present practice as found both in the literature and in the rich professional experiences available among the course participants. Activities, content, and materials are related to international curricula including, but not limited to, the International Primary Curriculum (IPC), the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program (PYP), the Middle Years Program (MYP), and the Diploma Program (DP). 

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 573 - Reflective Seminar: International Education


    This course is designed to provide students an opportunity to develop a diverse set of perspectives for analyzing organizations and/or taking effective leadership. The primary focus of the course is on understanding the various dynamics that affect the operation of educational organizations. Specifically, leadership theory, change theory, organizational behavior and policy analysis will be introduced. Learning to use multiple perspectives in the organization will give students opportunities to reflect on their role as an educator while expanding the set of possible choices they have for taking actions and leadership. Child protection themes will be included in this culminating course.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 574 - Research Project


    The Research Project is designed to engage a graduate student in the practical application of research principles and skills in the study and improvement of international classrooms and schools. Each student is asked to create a qualitative research proposal within the field of International Education. Using knowledge from the previous courses, the student will write a research proposal with attention to themes such as articulating a well-written problem statement, reviewing literature, matching evidence and outcomes, and planning triangulation of a variety of data types.  Although students will not implement proposals in this course, they will exit this (and the previous Research Methods course) with two excellent and “ready to go” research ideas.  Students will also have opportunities to practice how to conduct pre and post data analyses.  Students will be required to adhere to the standards, rules and procedures set forth in the APA (American Psychological Association) manual.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 575 - Practicum in Technology in Schools


    The practicum course provides students with a clinical experience in technology, moving students from merely reading about ideas to trying them out in practice. A goal of this course is to provide each student with opportunities to make contact with and to implement a broad variety of technology theories, system designs, and successful practices. Coursework will deal with matching specific theories of educational technology to present practice as found both in the literature and in rich professional experiences available among the other course participants. Students will be required to locate a technology-rich work or volunteer educational setting, as well as a mentor from that setting.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 580 - Innovative Practices in Education


    This course is designed to enhance the knowledge base for professionals in an era of school restructuring, technological innovation, and social change. Teachers and administrators will learn first-hand about innovative practices and recent research in the field. Topics include: student self-assessment, teacher reflection, cooperative learning, mentoring, the use of technology in schools, home school communication, inclusion to support learning diversity, and the challenge of school restructuring. In this course, students will learn how to assess a variety of educational contexts to determine the educational system or systems that are operational. Students will then identify educational practices that can be viewed as innovative. Students will then determine which innovative practices will fit the educational context.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 581 - Technology in Education


    This course explores the major concepts related to instructional computing as well as the impact that technology has on education. Required of all graduate students as they begin to integrate curriculum trends with an awareness of current sources for information and their role in a technologically-rich learning environment.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 582 - Research Methods


    This course is designed to acquaint students with the design, analysis, and interpretation of research in the social sciences. Emphasis will be given to the development of empirical questions from theory, research design and control, construction of survey instruments, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IED 583 - Technology Infrastructure in Schools


    This course will familiarize students with basic hardware and infrastructure, including: servers, wifi systems, mobile technologies, wiring, planning and accounting for technology in new building projects, finding the right suppliers, and evaluating and purchasing equipment. In summary, the course seeks to teach the basics of what needs to be known about hardware, acquisition, and installation. The course will also provide an overview of school-based policies on technology. The question of accountability and division of understanding of school wide systems will be explored along with student and community empowerment technologies.

    Credits: 3
  
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    INBS 550 - International Marketing


    We will focus on the unique problems associated with managing marketing operations across national borders. How can the firm identify and satisfy global customer needs better than the competition while coordinating marketing activities within the international environment? Topics include: the impact of culture on the global marketing environment; how to identify global market opportunities for an existing enterprise or a new venture; how to apply industry analysis, assessment of risk and new customer identification techniques in an international context; and how to develop and implement effective comprehensive marketing strategies on a global scale.

    Credits: 3
  
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    INBS 560 - International Business Negotiation


    This course will use a combination of simulations, role plays, readings, and class discussions to develop effective approaches to reaching agreement in international business negotiations. Students will be introduced to cross-cultural communication styles, national business expectations, and political interests that may diverge from the familiar and can often impede cross-border agreements. We will draw upon negotiation theory and cases to analyze specific international business negotiations and, through dynamic in-class simulations, gain hands-on experience in international business negotiation, conflict resolution, mediation, and arbitration.

    Credits: 3
  
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    INBS 570 - International Business Law


    This course provides an overview of the legal aspects of international business transactions and will introduce students to the international legal framework. We will examine topics central to international business law, from the role of comparative law, to the laws governing multinational enterprises; foreign investment; money and banking; and sales of goods, services, and labor. We will critically evaluate the substantive principles of law in relation to intellectual property rights, consumer protection, international sales of goods, and transnational dispute resolution by mediation, arbitration and litigation. This will include consideration of the impact of law on international trade, globalization and regionalism, and the global monetary system.

    Credits: 3
  
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    INBS 580 - Business and Management in BRIC Countries


    This course will examine the market dynamics and political economies of the BRIC countries with particular attention to international trade, FDI, and the nations’ probable future impact on the developing and developed worlds. The acronym BRIC was coined by a Goldman Sachs economist in 2001. The term refers to four countries (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) that were perceived to be likely to develop the world’s next biggest economies by 2050. Together, the BRIC countries include 40% of the world’s population and encompass about one quarter of the earth’s land mass. The four economies in aggregate contributed more than a third of global GDP growth during the past decade and constitute 25% of the world economy in terms of purchasing power parity. The term BRIC has become popular in the global media as well as by the leaders of these countries. The acronym has often been used to suggest a shift in global economic power away from the USA and the other G7 economies towards these four emerging nations. Although the BRIC countries have experienced remarkable economic growth during the past decade, the road has not been smooth nor is it likely to be in the future.

    Credits: 3
  
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    INT 100 - Internship I


    A 120-hour internship experience completed in January. Planning, required classes, and assignments begin during the fall semester in preparation for the on-site experience. The internship is exploratory and experientially based.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Students with 30 or more transfer credits may have the INT 100 requirement waived but must substitute an additional two credits of coursework.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 200 - Internship II


    A 120-hour internship experience completed during the month of January. Planning and assignments begin during the fall semester in preparation for the on-site experience. The internship is completed at a different worksite and the goal is more hands-on experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 530 - Integrative Learning I-Learning Tools


    Students learn to apply integrative practice and learning in education by developing and using tools which include dialogue, integrating seminars, personal experience, observation and critical thinking/ reading. Students learn to integrate their own reflections and unfolding ideas in response to others. This critical thinking ablity is important for educators and those considering a holistic approach to human development.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 541 - Developing Integrative Learning Techniques II: Processing Ideas


    Story is a key integrative learning technique. This course focuses on the nature of story as pedagogy in an integrative learning context. The course develops integrative thinking, responding, feeling, visioning in concert with ecological awareness. Metaphor and gaining insight into ends and means in one’s search for life-long principles becomes evident. An eco-cosmological framework is used as the approach for this study.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 543 - Applying Integrative Learning Techniques III: Application


    Building on Integrative Learning I and II, students focus on the application of integrative processes. The dynamic of the processes supports the adoption and adaption of the nuances of integrative learning. Natural mind-mapping, an eco-centric approach, is an example of an image-related investigation that explores human systems as functional relationships with ecological systems.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 553 - Exploring The Future Of Humanity I - Education and Systems 


    Students study a conceptual framework for the Future of Humanity. This exploration is based on the history of the cosmos and humanity’s role in creating a sustainable future for our planet. Students apply systemic thinking to the role of education. They reflect on past and present educational practices. As a fundamental aspect of integrative thinking, they apply critical thinking to inform their view of sustainability. Focus is on nature consciousness, deep ecology, holonic contexts and systems thinking in order to live in harmony with Earth systems.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 554 - Transformative Learning I: Reflections


    In preparation for their individual research assignment, students reflect independently on required readings and texts in a series of seminars. Students engage critically with authors and ideas through dialogue with other students to create deeper meaning. Annotations are used as resources for seminar responses and writing assignments.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 556 - Transformative Learning II: Focus on Change


    Students reflect on their own learning as stimulation for a shifting world-view. Students’ professional and personal interests are incorporated into a synthesis of ideas.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 557 - Exploring The Future Of Humanity II - Cosmic Task of Humans


    Students develop an understanding of the relationship between humanity and the Earth. They become aware of an interconnected web amongst humans and all ecological systems. They study the role of humanity as caretakers of this planet. Students also study concepts of “The Great Work” in education (Thomas Berry) which generates the first principles of organization, change and transformation. This course includes concepts of differentiation, autopoiesis and communion.
     

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 558 - Transformative Learning III: Assimilation 


    Students contextualize their learning within a specific area of interest and research. Students use the tools of integrative learning and their understanding of the needs for future human habitation of the Earth. Using a scientific analysis of recorded data to gain insight into neurophenomenology through explorative writing, creative expression, oral and video recording and sharing, and exposition.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 559 - Exploring The Future Of Humanity III - Forward Focus


    Students learn how humans might develop integrative thinking to co-exist within the boundaries of a living planet. Students reflect on the nature of Ecosapiens and consider how awareness of ecological and cosmological wisdom may lead to a possible ‘new human’ biological and psychological being.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 567 - Creativity And Research I: Observation


    Students learn how to observe, discriminate and record observations. Students also engage in creative processes to futher self-observation and gain intuitive insight critical to the integrative learning process. Observation and creative processes enable students to create experiences for the children or adults they teach as part of their ongoing research.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 568 - Creativity and Research II: Self and Other


    The impact of the presence, attitude and predispositions of the observer impacts the nature of the observed. This course is a study of the nature of observation beginning with an exploration of how humans came to be observers. Students become aware of themselves as observers by participating in creative activities. Students explore the idea that all research is ultimately a relationship between self and other, subject and object.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 569 - Creativity And Research III: Subject as Object


    Through creative awareness and neurophenomenology, students study the relationship between subject and object. They gain an understanding of the observer as the observed while understanding that every observation affects the observer as well as the observed. Through a formal written submission, students consider how these two roles are related.

    Credits: 2
  
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    INT 580 - Integrative Foundation Emphasis I: Pedagogy


    In this first continuation course, students will select an area of emphasis from four options, including: Peace through Education, Adolescence, Sustainable Nutrition, and Independent Choice. The emphasis area is a personal, passionate interest enabling learners to situate professional development in a field
    of their choice. TIES integrative seminars provide a “catalyst or lens” for exploring this emphasis area.

    Credits: 4
  
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    INT 584 - Integrative Foundation Emphasis II: Questioning


    A continuation course of Integrative Foundation Emphasis with an focus on questioning. The emphasis area is a personal, passionate interest enabling learners to situate professional development in a field of their choice. TIES integrative seminars provide an ongoing “catalyst or lens” for exploring this emphasis area.

    Credits: 4
  
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    INT 585 - Montessori Foundation Emphasis I: Pedagogy


    In this first continuation course, students will select an area of emphasis from four options: Emphasis Area for practitioners, Montessori School Leadership, Partner program, and Working with Children 6-12 years of age. The emphasis area is a personal, passionate interest enabling learners to situate professional development in a field of their choice. TIES integrative seminars provide a “catalyst or lens” for exploring this emphasis area.

    Credits: 4
  
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    INT 586 - Integrative Foundation Emphasis III: Development of Meaning


    A continuation course of Integrative Foundation Emphasis I & II with a focus on development of meaning. The emphasis area is a personal, passionate interest enabling learners to situate professional development in a field of their choice. TIES integrative seminars provide an ongoing “catalyst or lens” for exploring this emphasis area.

    Credits: 4
  
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    INT 587 - Montessori Foundation Emphasis II: Questioning


    A continuation course of Montessori Foundation Em- phasis, with a focus on critique. The emphasis area is a personal, passionate interest enabling learners to situate professional development in a field of their choice. TIES integrative seminars provide an ongoing “catalyst or lens” for exploring this emphasis area.

    Credits: 4
  
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    INT 589 - Montessori Foundation Emphasis III: Development of Meaning


    A continuation course of Montessori Foundation Emphasis I & II with a focus on questioning. The emphasis area is a personal, passionate interest enabling learners to situate professional development in a field of their choice. TIES integrative seminars provide an ongoing “catalyst or lens” for exploring this emphasis area.

    Credits: 4
  
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    IST 100 - Introduction to International Studies


    This introductory, interdisciplinary course exposes students to critical global issues through the lens of the arts, humanities, social and physical sciences. The course makes connections between seemingly disparate events, and contextualize those events in an historical period. Each discussion considers temporal political, socio-economic, and geographic as well as cultural issues in the given context. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IST 112 - Introduction to Peace Studies


    This course is an interdisciplinary overview into the realm of peace and conflict studies ranging from interpersonal to international conflict. Through case studies, this course analyzes numerous dimensions of conflict, violence, and peacemaking, including their religious, psychological, sociological, anthropological, environmental, political, economic, and historical components. Nonviolence will also be studied for its application in conflict situations. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IST 215 - The New Europe


    An overview of the historical development of European political and cultural identity from 1947 to present day. One of the major elements of the course is the study of common economic policies, as well as the introduction of the Euro and its impact on global relations. In addition, this course examines the future challenges presented by the growth of the European Union, its stability and the question of the European constitutional and institutional reforms. Satisfies the Global Issues General Educationrequirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IST 216 - International Conflicts


    Examines the theoretical and practical aspects of international conflicts in the “global” era. By applying the method of comparative analysis and the “case study” approach, the course will examine how conflicts arise and evolve, and how technological, institutional, and cultural effects of globalization make international conflict more complex and less manageable. A special focus is on conflict prevention and settlement, and peace-making processes. The course also compares international negotiation styles and practices, including negotiations with terrorists. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    IST 315 - Intercultural Communication


    Exploration of the interdisciplinary field of inter-cultural communication. Emphasis is on increasing communicative competencies in cross-cultural settings. Drawing from the fields of anthropology, communication, linguistics, psychology, and sociology, this course is designed for students who wish to gain the practical skills necessary to communicate effectively in today’s interdependent international community. 

    Credits: 3
  
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    IST 325 - World Geography


    A comprehensive study of regional world geography. The focus will be on both physiographic characteristics of each region as well as their human culture traits such as population, economics, language, religion and urban space. Emphasis is placed on the interaction between the culture and environment of various regions. Satisfies Global Issues General Education requirement. 

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 512 - Introduction to Coding


    This course is designed to provide the core basic of coding in several different languages. This course will explore the following languages: Python, Java, C#, C ++, VBScripts, .NET & Common Windows Commands. The course topics include understanding how coding works, how to write basic programs, how to automate daily needs in the IT workplace, and apply critical design and development strategies to a programing team.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 518 - Information Systems Strategy


    This course provides effective strategies, pragmatic options, and leading practice alternatives for developing an IT strategy, integrating it with the overall enterprise, measuring progress, and creating processes for selecting and deploying technology. Students will develop the concepts, frameworks, and approaches for strategically managing IS resources to leverage IT investments and focus on IT processes and leading practice. This course also explores the business implications of emerging Internet-based technologies such as wireless devices and Web services. Using business cases students will assess both the technical and organizational issues that arise.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 525 - Systems Architecture and Analysis


    This course discusses a wide range of topics, all relating to operating systems and systems architecture and design. The course will provide an overview of microprocessors, mainframes, micro-computers with the focus on memory management, I/O streams, logic gates, and basics of computer engineering. The course will also consider operating systems characteristics, design objectives and systems structures. It will cover topics including virtual memory management, multi-threading, forking, and algorithms. It will also overview of efficient algorithms, algorithmic complexity, NP completeness, spanning trees, greedy algorithms, matrices, string matching, and sorting.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 532 - Advanced Cloud Computing


    In this course we will build on the foundations that enable most organizations to build successful cloud adoption projects. This course will provide both the infrastructure and application architects interested in cloud computing or involved in cloud adoption projects with the necessary set of skills required for establishing successful implementations. We will also provide comprehensive information for those interested in building cloud-based architectures or need to explain to customers thinking about adopting cloud computing technology in their organization.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 534 - Managing Virtual Systems


    In this course we will discuss the necessary components required to create a virtual computing environment. This process involves bringing together the physical and logical resources, such as memory, processors, networks, and storage into a single, manageable virtual environment. Creating and using a virtual computing environment will then allow the user to consolidate the management and utilization of their system’s resources.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 536 - Object Oriented Programming


    Students will examine object-oriented components and characteristics including classes, inheritance, and polymorphism. In addition, students will learn how to write, debug, and execute Java programs, create Java applets and applications. Students will explore variables, data types, arrays, operators, control statements, classes, overloading, inheritance, abstract classes, interfaces, packages, exception handling, multi-threaded programming, Java applets, AWT, string handling, as well as an introduction to JDBC.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 538 - Web 3.0/Communications and Commerce


    This course introduces participants to the theory and practice of doing business on the Internet and the World Wide Web using Web 3.0 technology. Participants will first learn about the infrastructure that makes electronic commerce possible, including Internet protocols, applications, and languages. Participants will then examine electronic commerce software, security issues, and payment systems. Topics in business strategies for electronic commerce will include purchasing, electronic data interchange, supply chain management, virtual communities, and Web portals. The major objective of the course is for participants to understand how tools and strategies can be applied to e-business models including business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-consumer (B2C). Participants will also examine international, legal, and ethical issues as they relate to e-commerce.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 544 - Database Management


    Review of relational, hierarchical and network models; normalization; recovery and concurrency; security and integrity; query optimization; deductive and distributed database systems. Course will also explore advanced database topics such as data mining and data warehousing.

     

    Credits: 3

  
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    ITS 550 - Software Engineering


    This course will combine theoretical and practical foundations in software engineering. It will combine the various principles and methods of software engineering, with thoughtful consideration to new best practices and emerging techniques. Students will review the practical aspects of software engineering to include: generation of appropriate documents under limited resources and tight schedules as well as an industry perspective.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 553 - Technology and Innovation


    This course will explore emerging trends in business and consumer technologies and will provide students with the vision and understanding of how to leverage these technologies to create efficiencies in existing businesses processes. Topics will include off shoring, virtualization, data mining, open source software, digital search engines, national health records, electronic voting, automotive computing, pervasive computing (RFID tracking), software as a service (SaaS), e-publishing, digital divide, emerging gadgetries, and cybercrime.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 560 - Computer Security and Cyber Forensics


    This course is an overview of IS security drawing upon extensive knowledge of systems, networks and security. It will seek to understand how to audit systems, perform risk assessments, qualify and quantify the risks, based upon the current or planned infrastructure. The course will also look at encryption as a science, discussing public key ciphers (The RSA cipher, ElGamal cipher) and symmetric ciphers (Data Encryption Standard, Advanced Encryption Standard). Other topics will include SNMP, RMON, disaster recovery plans, protection of sensitive and classified information in the workplace, and secure systems architecture. The course will review computer forensics, to include:tools used, the investigative process, as well as current trends in forensics today. Prerequisite: ITS 540 Wireless and Wide-Area Networks.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 562 - Advanced Web Programming


    This course is a graduate level overview of advanced web programming and design techniques. Students will review relevant layout techniques using advanced features of CSS. The class will also use the web programming language PHP to create dynamic web pages. Using these new PHP skills, students will then learn to integrate database and dynamic access routines using MySQL. The class will include an investigation of sophisticated client-side programming techniques available through existing Javascript libraries such as jQuery.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 564 - Security Management


    This course provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of network security, including compliance and operational security; threats and vulnerabilities; application, data, and host security; access control and identity management; and cryptography. The course covers new topics in network security as well, including psychological approaches to social engineering attacks, Web application attacks, penetration testing, data loss prevention, cloud computing security, and application programming development security. This course will review computer forensics, to include: tools used, the investigative process, as well as current trends in forensics today.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 570 - Business Intelligence and Data Mining


    This course will describe the features, uses, and design strategies for information technology and enabled managerial decision support systems. Overviews of business intelligence frameworks that lead to strategic data mining techniques will be covered. The course will also introduce popular application-based business analytics and reporting tools.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 575 - Project and Professional Management


    The course includes preparation to meet the variety of professional and project demands placed on the information technology professional. The course draws from the areas of technical communication and rhetoric to develop oral and written communication competencies for a range of contemporary information technology contexts. Course will focus on project management as the primary vehicle for communication in the IT world. It will also cover the fundamental social and legal theories that are the underpinnings for complex decision making in Information Technology and Computer Science today. Topics will include intellectual property law, constitutional law, USA Patriot, copyright laws, cyberspace law, as well as social theory regarding the usage and creation of intrusive databases, and information gathering techniques.

    Credits: 3
  
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    ITS 585 - Internship/Field Study Seminar


    This seminar is designed to support the student’s professional efforts in the form of an internship or consulting project within a company. This is a hands-on learning experience designed to expand their MSIT learnings into a professional applications arena resulting in a personal competitive readiness for sophisticated post-graduation career pursuits.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     

    Students must have completed at least 2 full semesters or 18 credits to be considered to enroll in this course. Students will need to get permission from the Director in order to register for the course.

    Credits: 3

  
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    LST 100 - Seminar in Academic Inquiry


    Introduces students to college-level academic discourse and provides them opportunities to hone foundational skills that they will use throughout their undergraduate career and beyond. The course helps students develop critical thinking and reading skills, the ability to find and use sources to deepen understanding of topics, and the capacity to form and defend positions on issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Students with 24 or more transfer credits may have the LST100 requirement waived but must substitute a three-credit elective.

    Credits: 3
  
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    LST 102 - Military Student Transition


    This course will explore the significant and historical impact of military undergraduates and veterans upon communities of higher education.  We will examine research and case study evidence which demonstrate successful strategies for transition, adjustment and reintegration to college life and beyond.

    Credits: 3
  
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    LST 121 - Introduction to Gender Studies


    Introduces students to key topics and methods in the study of gender. Focusing on the idea that gender informs every aspect of social interaction, the course draws on material from literature, cultural studies, history, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and other disciplines.  The class surveys the history of gender studies before investigating how gender shapes communication, sexuality, and social institutions (educational, legal, religious, etc), and examining the nature of power in necessarily gendered relationships. Satisfies Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    LST 210 - Gender and Science


    What does it mean to be a scientist? How does gender complicate the way that we think about science? What effect has history had on access to education, and access to the practice of science? These are the issues that we will contemplate as we explore the relationship of science, gender and cultures. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    Credits: 3
  
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    LST 212 - Conflict Resolution


    This course provides an introduction to and broad overview of the field of conflict resolution, including aspects from law, community services, education, health care, criminal justice, and commercial spheres. It aims to increase awareness of conflict resolution processes and develop basic conflict resolution skills applicable to real life scenarios. Emphasis will be on developing an understanding of methods of dispute resolution, with units on facilitation, mediation, arbitration, conflict analysis, de-escalation, negotiation, community organizing, and conflict resolution careers. Satisfies the Individual & Society General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    LST 301 - Yoga: Theory, Culture & Practice


    The transcultural practice of Modern Postural Yoga is influenced both by a longstanding practice history in India and modern gymnastic techniques. This interdisciplinary course examines yoga philosophy and practice through the fields of anthropology, religious studies, psychology and health. Students will examine yoga as a cultural construct, a health and wellness practice and a meaning-making discipline that is used for secular, philosophical and religious means.

    Credits: 3
  
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    LST 303 - Images of Women


    An investigation of the ways in which women are seen in the world today, this course draws its content from literature, Speeches, advertising, and other forms of mass communication. Study of traditional images of women in both eastern and western cultures contributes to an understanding of the origin and basis of gender roles. Self-imaging and self empowerment are significant components of this course. Satisfies Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    LST 305 - Applied Research Methods


    This course provide an overview of research methods, including developing a research question and/or hypotheses, reviewing the literature in the field and choosing a method that will enable the investigator to answer their question. Students will be introduced to qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research design and the preliminary considerations that go into selecting a research method. Issues that arise in research will be discussed including, anticipating ethical issues, sample size and understanding how bias influences research from inception to analysis.   

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    LST 345 - Contemporary Issues in Society


    An examination and analysis of the critical issues and events of our contemporary world. The issues are approached through lecture, readings in current literature, the news media, and classroom discussion.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    LST 350 - Male Images in Story and Film


    In exploring images of the male in film and story, this course will study: the dynamics giving rise to these images, the truths and stereotypes underlying them, and the social, economic, political, and global interests and issues emanating from them.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    LST 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    LST 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students will investigate a topic related to liberal sudies in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class statue or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAR 550 - Ocean Sciences


    The class will study ocean sciences within a framework of emerging markets and public policy priorities. Areas of focus will include aquaculture, off-shore clean energy, and marine bioscience, as well as climate change, pollution and ocean acidification, ocean floor mapping and geology, and biological resource management.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAR 560 - Maritime Regulatory Environment


    This course will introduce students to areas of jurisdiction on the ocean, and the roles of federal regulatory agencies such as the Army Corps of Engineers, the Coast Guard, the National Marine Fishery Service, and the Bureau of Energy Management as well as their state counterparts. Coastal Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) and case studies of off-shore wind and aquaculture developments will be used to understand the permitting process.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAR 570 - Port and Shipping Operation


    This course will introduce students into the role of ports and shipping in the movement of goods, an examination of port and shipping operations and finance, and an exploration of current issues and challenges facing ports today.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MAR 580 - Waterfront Planning


    Case studies of working waterfronts and ports will be used to look at how unique attributes such as land use patterns, connection to land markets and access to off-shore resources guide development. Structures of governance for waterfronts, access to financing resources, and the context of state and federal priorities will be evaluated. The project for this course will be building a feasibility analysis for a specific new development in a waterfront location.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MGMT 505 - Engineering Management


    Engineering management is the discipline that combines leadership, the problem solving know-how of engineering and the technical skills of organizational management to build teams and realize the full life-cycle of complex products or solutions. This course will assume some technical background and focus on what makes some teams better than others and how managers improve their performance to form and cultivate productive teams by looking at the sociological aspects of technical management and the challenges and techniques of improving overall productivity. We will survey leadership and management tactics and skills through lecture, in-class exercises, readings and papers. Will discuss, but not focus on deep metrics or techniques for team or project management, and rather look at what sociological skills and environmental and organizational issues make for top performance, and which impair creativity, performance and success.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MGMT 507 - Leadership Principles


    This course will survey leadership in an attempt to define a useful framework for students to use in their work and personal lives. Because leadership is such an interesting and subjective concept, we will examine historical and contemporary models and practices, extending our search into the impact of leadership on work unit climate, creativity, and corporate ethics. We will use articles, movie segments, recordings of speeches, and other experiential activities to access new perspectives of how to be a leader. Each student will be required to develop a personal statement of leadership as a major outcome of the class.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MGMT 509 - Business Ethics


    This course will examine “self” in relation to the ethical platforms that individuals and future leaders need to understand so as to know how personal beliefs and actions might affect or influence your ability to be an effective business leader. This course will also examine the fundamental aspects of business ethics as it relates to the theoretical nature of the topic of business ethics and all of the facets of business ethics, including all stakeholders, who are affected by the impact of ethical or non-ethical decisions.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MGMT 527 - Creativity and Innovation


    The goal of this course is to drive home concepts, models, frameworks, and tools that managers need in a world where creativity and innovation is fast becoming a pre-condition for competitive advantage. This course explores some of the best practices of some of the world’s most creative and innovative firms. It also explores how we can personally be more creative and innovative in our individual lives. This course gives a broad overview of innovation and the managerial decisions that influence innovative performance.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MGMT 547 - Managing Innovation and Organizational Change


    The course includes the study of how innovations are developed and examines how individuals and groups become effective idea generators. In addition, the course examines organizational culture and the impact of culture on innovation and change. The course will also give the student a first-hand look and feel of how organizations change and how individuals in the organization can become proactive participants in the many changes occurring in business today. In addition to lecture and class discussions, the course will rely heavily on case analysis.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MHI 550 - Health & Medical Information Systems Overview


    This course provides an overview of the discipline of health informatics including key definitions, concepts, models and theories. The student is introduced to key application areas within Health Informatics, as well as historical, current, and emerging information systems in health care. Students will learn features and functions that are common to most health care information systems.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MHI 570 - Emerging Health & Medical Information Technologies & Standards


    This course introduces current and emerging information technologies in the field of healthcare including laboratory, imaging, claims, EHR, HIE and others. A discussion of data standards necessary to achieve interoperability within and among complex healthcare organizations is reviewed. Standards covered begin with the planning phases for health information technology (HIT) through data, data structures, terminology, data transport, electronic health records, decision support, privacy and security, ICD-10, HL7 and others and other related applications. This course also explores the anticipated impact of a National Health Information Infrastructure (NHII).

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MHI 580 - Policies and Trends in Healthcare Informatics


    Introduces Health Sector Management students to the interlocking segments of the industry (for example, doctors, hospitals, HMOs/PPOs, insurers, consultants, pharmaceuticals, and medical devices), their current status, and how they are changing. The course will explore the industry from several perspectives: the provider/patient/payer interface, the changing demographics of health, growth of technology, emerging regulatory patterns, and key government programs.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MHI 590 - Security, Ethics, Privacy & Compliance for Health & Medical Information


    This course provides an overview of the legal, regulatory, and ethical issues to be considered in the management and maintenance of health information. Local, state, federal, and international privacy laws and regulations—and the government agencies and regulatory bodies charged with creating and upholding these laws and regulations—will be considered, with particular attention given to the HIPAA, DEA and other healthcare specific regulations. Key topics to be explored include data security, privacy, confidentiality, data reporting requirements, compliance, accreditation, and professional ethics. Attention will be given to evaluation of the security of a system, the impact of information technology on patient safety and healthcare liability, and identification and management of potential opportunities and risks of electronic health record systems.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 501 - Introduction to School Leadership


    This course prepares educators to build and maintain a professional learning community. Students will become familiar with research on adult learners and the role of the school leader in promoting excellence in teaching and learning. Students will come to understand the role of leaders in recruiting, selecting, supporting, supervising, and evaluating professional and non-professional staff. Learners will study and apply systems theory and its application to the creation of the learning organization. They will be able to work with governing boards, staff, and parents to develop a vibrant learning environment. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 502 - Facilitating Teaching and Learning


    This course prepares educators to lead continuous improvement of school curriculum and instruction in international school settings. Students will come to understand the role of learning theory, curriculum design, instructional strategies, and assessment techniques in creating and maintaining high quality teaching and learning. Students will learn to lead colleagues in planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating curriculum. Students will learn to facilitate practices of data based, internationally oriented frameworks, for research-driven teaching and will develop a plan for instructional improvement.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 510 - Leadership in International Education


    This course includes a thorough review of theory and research on leadership, the study of organizational culture, and the principles necessary to support change. The course will also lay the foundation for the understanding of effective leadership in the international school, including exposure to the international school accreditation process, self study chairing process, and team chairing process of the Council of International Schools and the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 515 - Negotiation, Communication/Mediation to Improve Schools


    This course focuses upon negotiation and conflict management within organizations. Students will be able to understand the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations in competitive circumstances and employ such processes as negotiation, mediation, dispute resolution, and analytical problem solving in managing conflict. The course will also examine the philosophy, attitudes and methods of process consultation as an approach to helping individuals, groups, organizations and communities. It will deal with the psychodynamics of the helping relationship, modes of negotiation, types of active inquiry and listening, group process, facilitative interventions, communication methods, and dealing with resistance.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 520 - Strategies for Change in International Schools


    This course focuses on structuring schools for improvement and student success. A rethinking of curriculum and instruction, including the basic tenets held about what we should teach, how we should teach it, and how we assess what students learn, is the cornerstone for restructuring schools. Students will add to the ongoing dialogue about what, exactly, should characterize an international school or an international education in varied settings, whether multinational or culturally homogenous. The course will emphasize the role of the mission statement and the international school accreditation process.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 530 - Marketing of Organizations


    The course will introduce the concepts and principles of marketing in varied international settings, and help students develop an appreciation for the scope, relevance, application, and integration in the operation of programs, services, ideas, and products of for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. The scope of this class will review the principles of marketing which include marketing mix, product development, promotion/advertising, distribution, consumer behavior, and market segmentation. It will help students develop an understanding for the relevance, application, and integration in the operations of marketing programs, services, and creative development for profit and non-profit organizations. The course will provide an overview of differing host-country cultural milieus regarding fundraising and marketing strategies.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 537 - Operational and Financial Strategies


    This course is designed to help students “think strategically” and to evaluate results from the perspective of the organization operating in an increasingly diverse and competitive environment. The student will explore and acquire financial tools and competencies for budgetary planning and analysis. This course will provide a basic understanding of financial strategies in varied international settings, their related risks, analysis of financial information, and budgeting.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 564 - Leveraging Technology


    Leveraging Technology takes educational technology to a higher and applicable level by guiding course participants through research to identify key opportunities that lead to a positive impact on student learning in today’s International schools. The framework for this course is based on international technology standards and performance indicators for students, teachers, administrators, and technology coaches. This framework identifies innovative teaching strategies to empower K-12 students to become knowledge constructors, innovative designers, computational thinkers, global collaborators, and responsible digital citizens. This course also examines current school software systems that enrich the learning experience and that increase instructional efficiency.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 574 - Research Project in Administration


    The Research Project is designed to engage a graduate student in the practical application of research principles and skills in the study and improvement of international classrooms and schools. Each student is asked to create a qualitative research proposal within the field of International Education Administration. Using knowledge from the previous courses, the student will write a research proposal with attention to themes such as articulating a well-written problem statement, reviewing literature, matching evidence and outcomes, and planning triangulation of a variety of data types.  Although students will not implement proposals in this course, they will exit this (and the previous Research Methods course) with two excellent and “ready to go” research ideas.  Students will also have opportunities to practice how to conduct pre and post data analyses.  Students will be required to adhere to the standards, rules and procedures set forth in the APA (American Psychological Association) manual.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 580 - Innovative Practices in International Education Administration


    This course is designed to enhance the knowledge-base for school leaders in an era of school improvement, technological innovation, and social change. Students will learn first-hand about innovative practices and recent research in the field. Topics include innovative research and promising practices in: curriculum design, pedagogy, professionalism, management, leadership, the use of technology in the schools, home school communication, and inclusion to support learning diversity, governance, and the challenge of school improvement. In this course, students will learn how to assess a variety of international educational contexts to determine the educational system or systems that are operational. Students will then identify educational practices that can be viewed as innovative and which would fit the educational context. Additional areas covered are: Learning Theory, Classroom Atmosphere, Instructional Strategies, among others. This course also covers the dilemma children who are experiencing difficulty in learning situations face because of ethnic group frustrations in the community, problems of social adjustment, socio-economic inequities, and learning gaps. The role of the school in facilitating the program for children of various cultures to become valued members of the community is discussed.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MIEA 587 - Leadership Development Seminar


    This course provides students an opportunity to develop a personal leadership development plan that is action-oriented. The course focuses on understanding the various dynamics that affect the operation of educational organizations. Students will draw upon their knowledge of leadership theory, 360 degree evaluation, systems theory, organizational behavior and policy analysis as they develop an individual entry/advancement plan for career leadership positions in international education.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKTG 518 - Customer Relationship Management


    This course examines the customer relationship management process. The course will focus on the phases of a typical customer relationship, from acquisition to maintenance to renewal or re-acquisition. Course components will include the elements of a customer relationship cycle, the best practices for managing customer relationships, the relationship between marketing, sales and customers, and a look at the ways companies use CRM systems.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKTG 519 - Digital Marketing: Web Marketing and Platforms


    Provides an approach to understanding web platform marketing and electronic commerce. The course will examine ecommerce business models and institutions including Internet retail, subscription commerce, SaaS, and other platform strategies. Additionally, a focus on new and emerging trends in the ecommerce and digital marketing landscape, including those occurring outside the United States. This course will look to provide a framework for understanding the various technologies impacting the media in the marketplace today–as well as provide a structure for assessing the opportunities and challenges of innovations in coming years. It is designed to help students become effective marketers in the 21st century. Topics covered will include the, web 2.0, social media, online video, digital advertising, video-on- demand, mobile applications and interactive TV.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKTG 520 - Digital Marketing: Social and Mobile Marketing


    This course is designed to provide managers with a framework for understanding and succeeding in the social media and mobile marketing. The course covers trends in the industry, including: social business, social platforms, paid ads, analytics, and strategy. In this course you will learn the basic concepts, terms and principles that apply to the social media industry, analyze the activities of the leading social media companies and applications through articles, case studies, and lectures. In addition, this is designed to provide managers in the technology industry with a framework for understanding and succeeding in the fast growing mobile ecosystem. The course covers trends in the industry, including but not limited to: mobile design and development, B2B/B2C applications, business models, data collection/privacy.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKTG 521 - International Marketing


    This course develops an understanding of the opportunities and challenges facing the international marketer, the decision-making process in marketing products and services abroad, and the environmental factors-economic, cultural, and political-affecting the marketing process in the international marketplace. Additionally, we will examine the challenge of entering and operating effectively in foreign markets. Decisions must be made on international marketing objectives, strategies, and policies; foreign market selection; adaptation of products; distribution channels and communications to fit each foreign market; systems of international marketing organization, information gathering, planning and control.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    MKTG 522 - Branding and Advertising


    Offers students an opportunity to obtain an in-depth understanding of the brand-building process amid radical changes in today’s marketing communications platforms. Exposes students to concepts, frameworks, and theories critical to developing branding and advertising strategy in the twenty-first century, including brand positioning,  target audience’s definition, creative advertising, integrated marketing communications, the influence of social media, and assessing marketing and media effectiveness. Additionally, this course will provide the students with an opportunity to learn and apply the theories, strategies and practices of effective advertising management. The course utilizes theory, marketing and communications research. The specific topics covered in the course include consumer segmentation and target selection, consumer motivation and insight, developing a powerful communications strategy and advertising idea, evaluating and optimizing advertising execution, and developing a targeted and effective consumer connections and media plan.

    Credits: 3
 

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