Dec 06, 2022  
2019-2020 Van Loan Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Van Loan Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
  
  •  

    AUT 585 - Thesis/Capstone Project in ASD


    This course prepares students to lead their organizations in research/training/clinical capacities by equipping them with the skills to evaluate research, design large scale research or clinical/training projects, summarize the empirical results of a research/training project, and professionally present these results to a wider audience. Students will also learn to conduct an exhaustive and professional literature review, both to formulate questions and to derive best practices.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIO 201 - Anatomy and Physiology I


    A study of the human organism relating structure and function. The approach is an integrated one, stressing interrelationships and feedback systems: organic molecules, the cell, cellular respiration, tissues, skin, bones, muscles, and the nervous system. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIO 201 - Anatomy and Physiology I Lab


    A study of the human organism relating structure and function. The approach is an integrated one, stressing interrelationships and feedback systems: organic molecules, the cell, cellular respiration, tissues, skin, bones, muscles, and the nervous system. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BIO 202 - Anatomy and Physiology II


    A study of the human organism relating structure and function. Topics include: the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system, endocrinology, digestion, metabolism, the urinary system, water and electrolyte balance, and the reproductive systems. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab). Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIO 202L - Anatomy and Physiology II Lab


    A study of the human organism relating structure and function. Topics include: the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system, endocrinology, digestion, metabolism, the urinary system, water and electrolyte balance, and the reproductive systems. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab). Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BIO 242 - World Disease


    The study of the biology of major diseases that impact our society and other parts of the world, especially underdeveloped and overpopulated regions. The course examines the biological, social, historical, and economic problems involved in eradication, prevention and cure. Satisfies Global Issues General Education requirement. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIO 292 - Microbiology


    An introduction to microorganisms, including bacteria, single-celled eukaryotes, and viruses.  Specific areas covered include cultivation, detection using conventional and molecular approaches, cell biology and metabolism, genetics, virulence and infectious disease, microbial ecology, genetic engineering and industrial applications. Laboratory work (separate syllabus and component) involves cultivation and analysis of microorganisms. (Lecture: 3 cr., Lab: 1 cr.)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Two BIO courses with associated labs.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BIO 292L - Microbiology Lab


    An introduction to microorganisms, including bacteria, single-celled eukaryotes, and viruses.  Specific areas covered include cultivation, detection using conventional and molecular approaches, cell biology and metabolism, genetics, virulence and infectious disease, microbial ecology, genetic engineering and industrial applications. Laboratory work (separate syllabus and component) involves cultivation and analysis of microorganisms. (Lecture: 3 cr., Lab: 1 cr.)

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BIO 335 - Pathophysiology


    A study of the alterations of normal anatomy and physiology that result in diseases. Topics will be organized according to body systems. Theories of etiology, the progression of the disorder, clinical symptoms and differential diagnosis will be discussed. This course is aimed at the future health professional, medical researcher or athletic trainer, and will include analysis of case studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 202 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 508 - Corporate Social Responsibility and Business Ethics


    This course examines ethical decision making in the organizational context. It explores the issues that relate to defining the ethical dimension of the business or management decision, considering various alternatives for action, weighing the rights of various stakeholders, as well as evaluating the consequences that arise from a particular decision. The course also examines the business organization as a social institution. The firm is viewed in the context of the larger society with corresponding roles and responsibilities that arise as a social institution.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 510 - Accounting from a Manager’s Perspective


    The objective of this course is to introduce students to the accounting process and systems and key financial statements for appropriate managerial decision making. The accounting of balance sheet and income statement items are examined in depth in accordance with the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The course also examines managerial accounting concepts for preparation and interpretation of internal financial information. In this course, students develop skills in analyzing and recording business transactions to prepare financial statements, using the accounting equation to understand various components of the financial statement, and the relationships among financial statements to evaluate the performance of a business.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 512 - Leading & Managing Global Virtual Teams


    Virtual teams, in particular global international virtual teams, have become the norm. The world has been flattening, talent and expertise must be tapped within the markets, the operating environments, and the locations in which it resides. According to a 2015 Gallup survey, 84% of people work in virtual teams for at least part of their time. The success of any business depends on its ability to engage and synergize talent and activities regardless of logistical and geographic distance and challenges. This is a leadership course that integrates the critical theories, constructs and practices enabling global team leaders to build, manage, and deliver successful virtual team products and services. Business operations, team development, organizational behavior, social psychology, cultural adaptation and virtual complex problem solving and decision-making are amongst the constructs to be addressed. Analysis, design, leading and managing of teams will be understood through the use of industry and student personal case studies. Students will assess their personal leadership styles to gain insights as to personal challenges to leading and adapting in a global virtual environment.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 515 - Managerial Finance and Decision Making


    A study that emphasizes the financial issues that managers of business units of all sizes face in risk management, valuation, financing, and investment decisions. Analysis is built around the objective of balancing the multiple demands and interests of a variety of stakeholders: shareholders, management, suppliers, distributors, employees, the local environment and others. Topics will include examination of areas affecting business investment decisions (with measure of risk and profitability), analysis of corporate financial information, forecasting and budgeting, management of assets and liabilities, cost allocation, variance analysis, cash flow management, and capital budgeting. The course employs a multi-functional approach to managerial decisions.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 518 - Legal, Ethical, and International Environment of Business


    The phenomenon of globalization has affected virtually every aspect of business. In the interconnected and interdependent global economy, commercial transactions
    and international financial contracts have proliferated. Yet, the world is an assortment of more than 300 jurisdictions, each with its own rules and regulations. This has resulted in a complex international legal environment, often tangled with inconsistent legal rules and unpredictable judicial interpretative actions. Within this context, this course provides an overview of the legal aspects of international business transactions and will introduce students to the international legal framework. We will examine topics central to international business law, from the role of comparative law, to the laws governing multinational enterprises;foreign investment; money and banking; and sales of goods, services, labor, transportation, financing, and taxation. We will critically evaluate the substantive principles of law in relation to intellectual property rights, consumer protection, international sale of goods, and transnational dispute resolution by mediation, arbitration, and litigation. This will include consideration of the impact of law on international trade, globalization and regionalism, and the global monetary system. The course will also examine how globalization, deregulation, and technology create a highly competitive environment that affects the operational purpose and future of human resource management.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 520 - Managing in the Evolving Workplace


    This is a foundational course for understanding and applying the practices of management in complex, rapidly changing global organizations. This course seeks to develop an understanding of the larger context in which business organizations operate. Political, social, legal, public policy, regulatory, and environmental contexts are covered accordingly. Also, this course will develop an understanding of traditional notions of the business organization, as compared with new management paradigms that create shared visions, employee empowerment and cross-functional, self-managed teams. Key topics surveyed include: The Role of Technology in the New Economy; The Wisdom of Teams; A Stakeholder Model of Corporate Responsibility; The Learning Organization; Knowledge Management; Strategic Management in the Global Economy.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 521 - Financial Reporting and Analysis


    This course is designed to provide the analytical framework needed to understand and evaluate financial statements, employ and interpret financial ratios, and perform basic financial analysis. “Profit†is examined through a critical lens. Students learn how to use financial statements to evaluate a company for investment and/or merger and acquisition purposes. The material is presented in the context of the following business perspectives: the ethical dimensions; globalization implications; political, social, legal, and regulatory issues; and technological change.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BUA 525 - e-Commerce and Evolving Business Practices


    This course examines the new and changing technologies and issues in the business world as the use of the internet-based tools and services has become common place. This course investigates the rapidly evolving practices in business and examines the short and long-term impact on organizational culture, primary markets, policies, and procedures. It also looks at the management structure.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 526 - International Accounting


    As more and more businesses participate in the global marketplace, the ability to read and understand financial statements of non-U.S. based companies will become even more important. Financial statements of U.S. companies are prepared using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles or GAAP as promulgated by the AICPA. However, the preparation of financial statements of foreign companies is governed by the International Accounting Standard Board, as influenced by political and cultural institutions of each nation. This course will examine the historical development of these accounting practices. Topics will include international accounting and reporting standards, issues associated foreign currency transactions, foreign taxation, emerging issues in international accounting and efforts to standardize accounting practices among varying geographical regions.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 529 - Project Management


    This course focuses both on the analytical tools to manage projects as well as the people management tools necessary for project success. The entire process of implementing a project, from project definition to the evaluation of feasibility, scheduling, financial, and budgetary factors is examined in detail. Contemporary management techniques, based on Project Management Institute (PMI) current practices, are used in case analyses to deepen student understanding. Current software options are discussed. 

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 530 - Small Business Management


    Every business begins as a small business. This course will seek to explore the roll-up-your-sleeves, “do more with less” mentality employed by successful businesses as they seek to reduce costs, streamline operations, and achieve more with smaller, smarter staffs. This course is geared towards entrepreneurs but will most certainly benefit anyone working in( (or desiring to work in) a small company environment. In the context of a start-up or operating small business subjects covered will include product development and positioning, process creation and implementation, staffing (and/or outsourcing), customer service, sales, and PR with limited resources. The franchise model will also be explored. The course will be taught mostly case style. Students will also gain a working, hands-on knowledge of the QuickBooks accounting software-a cornerstone of so many small businesses. There will be a mid-term, individual and/or team assignments and a final team project in which you will envision a small business venture of your own in the form of a business plan and final presentation.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 532 - Quantitative Methods for Decision Makers


    This course provides the fundamental quantitative knowledge necessary for professionals to utilize the results of analyses to enhance the decision-making process. This course explores quantitative analysis including basic statistics principles such as descriptive statistics, probability distributions, inferential statistics (sampling), regression analysis, time-series analysis, non-parametric statistics, and quantitative analysis techniques such as optimization theory, decision analysis, and decision trees.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 535 - Managerial Economics


    This course examines the principles or microeconomics by focusing on how to manage effectively in the context of customers, suppliers, competitors, and the regulatory environment. This course examines the microeconomic theories of marginal analysis and competitive analysis. Further, the course develops the principles of cost, strategy, and organizational analysis. Microeconomics will be used to demonstrate how managers evaluate both the internal structure and incentives within a firm, as well as the competitive forces external of the firm. Emphasis will be placed on the 2008-2009 financial crisis that has resulted in a deep world wide economic recession.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 542 - Operations Management


    This course considers the evolution of the modern operations function, the design of systems, and scheduling the management of materials and the provision of services. The course examines operations management as linking all aspects of the organization, including its employees, processes, customers, and suppliers. The student examines operations in the context of the organization as a whole. The course examines the various elements of operations management, from technical to organizational. Concepts explored include: quality, human resource management, supply chain management, and project management.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 543 - Leadership in Information Technology


    This course focuses on the role of information technology and the challenges confronting the management of those resources. Handled in phases, it first compares and contrasts the traits of both manager and leader before moving to an overview of key IT functions (and their evolution over the past 25 years), culminating in an appreciation for what it takes to be an effective IT executive in today’s business world. Unlike a traditional information systems management course focusing on the detailed mechanisms of computer systems, software, networking, etc., this course assumes exposure and knowledge to those principles and builds on that knowledge to address the strategic and tactical issues facing IT management. Therefore, it is geared as a management course relevant to information technology versus a core computer science course.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 545 - Business Legal Issues


    This course examines the legal and regulatory environment of the American legal system and its relationship to business, including contracts, tort and criminal law, sales and consumer protection, agency and employment law, business organization, international law, and cyber law.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 556 - Applied Corporate Finance^


    ^This course is no longer available as of 1/18/17. 

  
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    BUA 560 - Marketing and Customer Value Management


    Marketing management fundamentals are discussed as a process that explains the dynamic relationships between corporations and their target markets and audiences. Analysis, planning, implementation, and program management are emphasized throughout the course as support functions for corporate strategy focusing on customer value. The major objective of this course is to understand the relationship between incorporate (umbrella) strategies and brand strategies that offer their customers emotional and physical value.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 561 - Managing in the Global Business Environment


    An examination of the multitude of forces and factors that influence organizations doing business on a global scale. Close examination will be given to methods of managing global organizations as they adapt to cultural, regulatory, market, and economic differences as they seek to accomplish organizational objectives. Important management issues specific to international business will be discussed to prepare students to improve their management capabilities. Key issues examined in the course will be an overview of the legal aspects of international business transactions; laws governing multi-national enterprise; foreign investment; money and banking; impact of law on international trade, and the global monetary system.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 574 - Field Study I: Consulting Project Seminar


    This seminar is designed to facilitate student teams as they embark upon an actual management consulting engagement with a local client. Students meet once a week with the instructor who works as an advisor throughout this project. This is a hands-on learning environment whereby students apply concepts acquired throughout the MBA program.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 575 - Field Study II: Consulting Project Seminar


    This seminar is designed to facilitate student teams as they embark upon an actual management consulting engagement with a local client. Students meet once a week with the instructor who works as an advisor throughout this project. This is a hands-on learning environment whereby students apply concepts acquired throughout the MBA program.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 581 - Managing Information Systems


    This course will investigate the role of information and systems in organzations by focusing on the following: (1) Work Place Technology Overview-databases, networks, software, client server, hardware; (2) Managing Technology (Production and Development)-system development life cycle, project management, managing production systems, software evaluation; (3) Process Automation-business process, re-engineering, total quality management; (5) Management Perspective-staffing, managing workflow, leveraging systems to support decisions, outsourcing, “meet the CIO.”

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 582 - Business Research Methods


    A basic course for general managers and executives in understanding and applying research and data analysis for problem solving in organizations. Students will study research design strategies, sources and collection of data, and the analysis and presentation of data as applied to problem solving, decision making, and strategic planning in organizations. The course will explore traditional research techniques and use the internet to conduct data collection and research projects. As an end product, each student group will develop and present a research proposal that they will then work on throughout their MBA curriculum.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 585 - Human Resources in Transition


    During the past decade, in a major paradigm shift, the human resource function has been moving away from its traditional role as a paper-pushing, hiring/firing support mechanism and toward bottom-line decision making. In growing numbers of corporations, employees are viewed as an integral resource, vital to the success of the firm. This, in turn, has often resulted in an expansion of the Human Resource Management (HRM) role. On the other hand, some multinational corporations have moved in the opposite direction, flattening their organizational structures and marginalizing HRM, devolving its responsibilities to staff positions.Meanwhile, international developments are becoming ever more significant as a result of the globalization of trade, finance, and the world economy. As globalization and deregulation create a world of hyper-competition, what is the operational purpose and future of HRM? This course will enable students to examine these and other current HRM issues and strategic models.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 587 - Business Policy and Strategy


    Business policy and strategic management are two overlapping concepts that are studied from the perspective of CEOs, Board of Directors, and often times Vice Presidents. While policy focuses more on the purpose, direction, mission, and organizational values, strategic management deals more with creating a long-term management plan for enabling the organization to effectively implement new ideas and changes as required for continuous growth. Many issues, and decisions facing senior level management are very complex, dynamic, and sometimes unstructured. The overall purpose of this course is to provide conceptual an analytical tools to enable students to think strategically about how to effect positive change within the organization and in the society at large.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 588 - International Business; Cork


    This course provides unique opportunities for students to understand and ‘experience’ similarities and differences among Irish, European and US markets and businesses and to identify key success factors and challenges by visiting Irish corporations and multinational companies in a variety of industries employing unique business models who are operating in Ireland. The trip will include two days of cultural immersion by visiting historical attractions, museums and participating in cultural events.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUA 591 - Business Research Seminar I


    Three Business Research Seminars (I, II, III), each worth one credit (four hours each), are interspersed across the curriculum. The Thesis Advisor, who serves as the main resource to the students during the research process, will facilitate these seminars, which represent critical milestones in the development of the Master’s thesis.

    Credits: 1
  
  •  

    BUA 592 - Business Research Seminar II^


    ^This course is no longer available as of 1/18/17. 

  
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    BUA 593 - Business Research Seminar III^


    ^This course is no longer available as of 1/18/17. 

  
  •  

    BUS 110 - Business Computers I


    Provides current introduction to computer system concepts and personal computers in particular. Implications of information technology on business are explored. Problem-solving skills using word processing and presentation software and the World Wide Web are developed.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 115 - Business Computers II


    Builds on the understanding of information technology and its impact on business. Emphasis is on using advanced presentation, database, and Web creation software to solve problems in business.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS110 or equivalent competency

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 120 - Business Fundamentals I


    Half of a two-semester integrative interdisciplinary course (with BUS 121) focusing on the interdependencies in business while providing a foundation for advanced study and a framework for defining internship and career direction. Readings, exercises, team projects, and the first internship experience are used to develop the analytical, interpersonal, and communication skills required for business success.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 121 - Business Fundamentals II


    Half of a two-semester integrative interdisciplinary course (with BUS 120), focuses on the interdependencies in business while providing a foundation for advanced study and a framework for defining internship and career direction. Readings, exercises, team projects, and the first internship experience are used to develop the analytical, interpersonal, and communication skills required for business success.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 120

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 125 - Introduction to Business


    Provides students beginning a minor in the School of Business with knowledge and skill required to be successful in completing both required and elective courses in the minor. Topics include basic economics, global business considerations, business ethics, business formation, management, marketing, product development and distribution, accounting, financial management, and information technology. The course is not open to students majoring in the School of Business unless permission is given by the director.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 200 - Marketing


    An introductory overview of marketing in the 21st century. Techniques for the application of key marketing frameworks and tools for analyzing customers, competition, and marketing strengths and weaknesses are examined. Emphasis is placed on methods for the selection of target markets. Strategies that integrate product, price, promotion, and place to meet the needs of a target market are studied.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 210 - Finance


    An introduction to finance including organization, taxes, capital markets, the commercial banking system, interest rates, financial analysis, financial forecasting, working capital management, marketable securities, accounts receivables, inventories, and short term credit markets. Students will use financial computers and/or software applications to apply concepts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 175

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 270 - Communicating in Business


    Develop critical oral and written managerial communication skills required of professionals.  Students learn the characteristics of effective business communication, including the need to identify audiences and their preferred communication styles.  Written, oral and interpersonal communication skills are built through a variety of exercises that include crafting email, letters, memos, executive summaries, and visual aids. Students learn how to incorporate evidence and effectively structure communications to deliver negative and positive business news, how to contend with ethical considerations, and how to communicate persuasively. Additionally, focuses on the use tables, figures, and graphs to enhance all forms of communication.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 121 and ENG 111 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 300 - Entrepreneurship


    Examines the historic evolution as well as the economic and societal impact of the entrepreneurship process, from conception to implementation of a new venture. Focus is on attributes of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial teams in their search for and assessment of various resources to convert opportunities into profitable businesses.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 302 - Legal Environment for the Business Manager


    This course gives students a working knowledge of the legal system and the law and how it affects day-to-day operations of businesses all over the world. Topics include: small business and the law, the judicial process, trials and alternative dispute resolution, Constitutional law, the administrative agency, contracts and liability, debtor/creditor relationships, labor law, employment discrimination and sexual harassment, environmental law, consumer protection, federal securities and anti-trust law, and international corporations and the law.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 303 - International Business


    An overview of the environment in which international businesses compete. This course introduces the student to the impact of culture and political economy on business decision making, the economics and politics of international trade and investment, the nature of the international monetary system, the strategies and structures that characterize successful international enterprises, and the special role that each business function plays within a firm operating globally.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 305 - Human Resource Management


    This course examines employee-employer relationships in the work place today. Policy areas covered are: job design, recruiting, employee selection, placement, job training and career development, performance evaluation, compensation strategies, incentives, and benefits. There is also discussion of current economic situations as they impact the work place today, including labor/management relations.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 309 - Project Management


    Preparation to meet the variety of communication demands made on the business professional as they are engaged in coordination of disparate and similar functional groups in product or process development. The course draws from the areas of project management, business communication, and rhetoric to develop oral and written communication competencies for a range of contemporary business contexts.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 320 - Organizational Behavior


    A comprehensive investigation into the dynamics of behavior in organizations. Examines individual and group behavior, motivation, leadership styles, conflict, organizational culture, and the process of change in organizations. Through case studies and group exercise, the course emphasizes an analytical approach. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 325 - Operations Management


    An introduction to operations and production management. This course examines the evolution of the modern operations function, the design of systems and scheduling, the management of materials, and the provision of services in contemporary businesses. All facets of an enterprise, including employees, processes, customers, and suppliers are looked at as a system.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 327 - Supply Chain Management


    CIS Madrid, Spain-Business

    Supply chain management includes the design, planning, execution, control, and monitoring of supply chain activities with the objective of creating net value, building a competitive infrastructure, leveraging worldwide logistics, synchronizing supply with demand, and measuring and improving supplier performance globally. Students will examine a complete overview of material flow from internal and external suppliers throughout the enterprise and to the end user. Topics include managing the comprehensive supply chain, procurement and strategic sourcing, supplier relationship management, outsourcing, contract management, and negotiation.

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    BUS 328 - Sales Management


    This course examines the elements of an effective sales force as a key component of an organization’s total marketing effort. The course addresses understanding the sales process, the relationship between sales and marketing, sales force structure, customer relationship management (CRM), use of technology to improve sales force effectiveness, and issues related to recruiting, selecting, training, motivating, compensating, and retaining effective salespeople.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 330 - Consumer Behavior


    Study of the consumer as a decision maker. Social and psychological influences on purchasing decisions are examined with emphasis on their implications for retail marketing strategy. Topics include: external and internal influences on consumer lifestyles, the nature of consumer motivation, the purchase decision process as it relates to the consumption of consumer goods and services, and appropriate marketing responses.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 335 - Managing Innovation


    The fundamental process underlying the emergence of new enabling or disruptive technology and its effects on existing business, and society will be examined. Both qualitative and quantitative methods for technology assessment are reviewed. An emphasis is placed on developing technology-forecasting research.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 338 - Management of Closely-Held and Family Businesses


    CIS Madrid, Spain-Business

    This course is intended to introduce the student to the unique management issues facing the family/privately-owned business in today’s economy. By understanding the integration of family and business system issues, the student learns how to build basic fundamentals for the management of these entities to maximize the chance for future survival into succeeding generations.

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    BUS 348 - Introduction to Business Analytics


    CIS Madrid, Spain-Business

    This course examines how data analytics (big data) informs business decisions and processes. Students acquire an understanding of the terminology, concepts and potential tools and solutions of data analytics. Regression methods including linear, non-linear, and Bayesian will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the retrieval, cleaning, and manipulation of data, and the process for identifying the relevant data elements for a given audience.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 126

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    BUS 350 - Global Marketing Management


    Focus is on the unique problems associated with managing marketing operations across national borders. Topics include: the impact of culture on the global marketing environment; how to identify global market opportunities for an existing enterprise or a new venture; how to apply industry analysis, assessment of risk, and new customer identification techniques in an international context; and how to develop and implement effective marketing strategies on a global scale.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 355 - Risk Management


    Addresses present and emerging needs in a variety of industries and professional fields. Provides an overview of systematic responses used to manage potential threats to individuals, organizations and agencies through the use of strategies and procedures engineered to minimize consequences and maximize opportunities. Using a Risk Management Model to identify and assess risk, implement strategies and evaluate outcomes, students will understand how properly designed risk management processes are used to protect individuals, organizations, or agencies against financial, physical, legal and other damages, including risk associated with terrorism and natural disaster.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 360 - Retail Management


    CIS Madrid, Spain-Business

    Examines the professional management of various types of retail institutions from the perspective of a professional manager and from that of an entrepreneur. Includes a topical analysis of the retail mix: organization and personnel policies, merchandise selection and pricing issues, display and store layout, promotional policy, and services retailing. Emphasis is on comprehensive planning, control, and integration of high performance retail strategy.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor.
     

    Credits: 3

  
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    BUS 365 - Business, The Environment and Sustainability


    Examination of environmental and social consequences of industrial society and managerial responses with emphasis on the effect of sustainability on corporate performance.  The impacts, in both domestic and global contexts, of current trends in industrial operations and government policies on health, equity, and environmental sustainability will be considered. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 370 - Business Analysis and Research


    CIS Madrid, Spain-Business

    A prerequisite for the semester internship, focus is on translating a business problem into a research project. Includes approaches to industry and internal analysis, ways to identify relevant data and appropriate sources, primary and secondary data collection, methods of data analysis, and effective interpretation and presentation of findings. Examples of published research in business are analyzed to provide a foundation for the creation of an effective research design proposal for an actual business problem as the final deliverable in the course. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 200, BUS 121, BUS 270, junior class status or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3

  
  •  

    BUS 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    CIS Madrid, Spain-Business

    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    Credits: 1

  
  •  

    BUS 380 - Small Business Management


    This course focuses on both the entrepreneurial aspect and continuing management of a small business (fewer than 100 employees). The presumption is that the business already exists and therefore the focus is on issues of management facing a small business. Topics include  leadership, decision making, management, marketing, financial controls, and other processes to insure the successful start up and long-term health of the business enterprise.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    BUS 381 - Nonprofit Management


    CIS Madrid, Spain-Business

    Students will develop an informed perspective of selected theories about the nature of nonprofit organizations and their role in governance, as well as key issues affecting the sector and the implications for practice. Students will address collective operational and organizational problems. This course also reviews trends affecting the differentiation between private, public, and nonprofit sectors.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3

  
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    BUS 415 - Business Negotiation


    Provides students with techniques for becoming skillful negotiators in a wide range of settings. The framework and fundamental steps of negotiating action plans are examined. Students will be introduced to current theory surrounding the negotiation process.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 425 - Business and Society


    CIS Madrid, Spain-Business

    Examines social and ethical challenges faced by managers and the potential of such challenges to impact the business institution, its stakeholders, investors, the community, and society. Using readings and case studies, situations where business strategy and public policy or personal interest overlap are examined to develop a conceptual framework to guide socially responsible individual and corporate problem solving and decision making in business.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior class status or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3

  
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    BUS 440 - Topics in Real Estate Seminar


    CIS Madrid, Spain- Business

    Explores in depth an aspect of owning and operating real estate as an investment. Topics and course descriptions will change from semester to semester. Examples of topics may include the financing, development and/or management of real estate properties, and issues related to owning and managing real estate investment trusts and portfolios. Students may take more than one section of this course providing the topic is different from one section to the next.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 175, ACC 205 or BUS 210 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3

  
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    BUS 450 - Dynamics of Leadership


    An extensive look at the nature of leadership and the dilemmas facing leaders of people at work. In-depth analysis of the forces motivating the behavior of people working in ongoing and temporary groups. Includes problems of authority and influence, development of roles and norms, initiation of change, and dealing with resistance. Recognition of women’s and men’s parity in leadership opportunities is a major consideration. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 460 - Brand Management


    Recognizing the strategic importance of branding, this course examines theories and strategies for building, leveraging, and defending strong brands, and showcases current opportunities and challenges facing brand managers. Emphasis is placed on understanding psychological principles at the consumer level that will improve managerial decision making with respect to brands.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 475 - Business Strategy and Policy


    A culminating course in the Business program, examines the challenge to top management presented by a new or expanding business. Students learn decision making for an organization experiencing growth and change. Topics include organization planning and strategy in a competitive environment. The student is asked, from the point of view of the senior manager, to integrate and apply the knowledge learned in accounting, finance, marketing, organizational behavior, etc., to develop a comprehensive strategy for a firm that can lead to competitive advantage and high performance results.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC175, ACC 205 or BUS210 or permission of the instructor

    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 480 - Semester Internship


    CIS Madrid, Spain- Business

    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.
     

    Credits: 12

  
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    BUS 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 370, BUS 480 (as a prerequisite or corequisite), and senior class status or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
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    BUS 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students will investigate a topic related to business, in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CHE 230 - Forensic Science


    An introduction to forensic science. This course gives the student an understanding of the scientific method and covers the topics of physical evidence, crime scenes, microscopic fiber analysis, forensic serology, DNA as a scientific tool, finger printing, ballistics, and firearm analysis. Satisfies Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    High school biology or chemistry, or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    This course provides an overview of the components of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, and corrections. In addition, the course provides an understanding of what crime is, why crime occurs, how much crime there is, the juvenile justice system and crime victims’ rights in the criminal justice system. This course provides the foundation for all subsequent criminal justice and law courses.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 151 - Criminal Law


    A complete review of federal and state criminal statutes with a case analysis approach. Elements of crimes against persons, property and other societal deviations. Intent, limitations, defenses and burden of proof are included.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 200 - Criminology


    This course provides an overview of the major criminological theoretical perspectives. It will examine the social, political and intellectural milieu within which each arose. Beginning with the 18th and 19th century theories, the course focuses on the sociological, psychological, and political constructions of criminality and their effects on the criminal justice system. Satisfies Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 205 - The American Court System


    An examination of the pre-adjudication and adjudication stages of the criminal process. The roles of the various participants in the criminal trial will also be examined. Focus is on the manner in which the trial system works and the rules governing its operation.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 210 - Police Process


    An examination of the social and historical setting of the police. Additionally, the police role in society, police discretion, police career, and police values and culture, organization and tactics will be examined. 

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 215 - Corrections


    A study of the history and development of the adult correctional system as part of the larger adult criminal justice system. Includes a review and analysis of theories of punishment, a study of institutionalization, alternatives to incarceration, and the roles of convicted offenders and the criminal justice personnel who work with them. 

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 230 - Technology Applications in Criminal Justice


    This course provides an overview of the use of information technology systems within the criminal justice community and examines the evolution of information technology in criminal justice, applied uses of today’s technology in criminal justice and the integration of technology into police operations, court and prosecution services and correctional administration. Students explore technologies and systems that criminal justice practitioners use and depend on every day including, but not limited to, database systems, analytical software, information sharing and communications interoperability, mapping and geo-spatial software; biometrics, and networking and information security services.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 241 - Victimology


    Examination of current theory and research regarding victims of crime. Devotes attention to concepts such as victim vulnerability and victim culpability. In addition, the course discusses the implications of a victim oriented perspective for the administration of justice and assesses current victim programs, including restitution, mediation, and compensation.(Formerly CJ 356)

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 300 - The Juvenile Justice Systems


    An examination of the underlying theory and operation of the juvenile justice system. Analysis of the procedures used to process an alleged juvenile delinquent through the justice system and the impact of juvenile delinquency on the general society is conducted. The course also focuses on the similarities and differences between the juvenile and the adult criminal justice system.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 301 - Criminal Procedures


    This course focuses on an historical evaluation of the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 14th Amendments and the use of making rights prescribed under the Bill of Rights applicable to the individual states. Inherent problems are detailed as the Constitution applies to police practices, illegal search and seizure, and right to counsel. Precedents are studied for the conclusions reached.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 341 - Domestic Violence


    This course covers the history of domestic violence as a social problem, its dynamics, prevalence, outcomes, research issues, and contemporary domestic violence policy. The course focuses on domestic violence in the United States. The goal of this course is to provide students with a broad understanding of domestic violence, its effects on today’s society and the resources available to address it. The course also cultivate the knowledge and skills that will allow students to critically evaluate representations of domestic violence in a variety of contexts.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 354 - International Justice


    This course addresses international justice for atrocities, human rights violations, and other international crimes. Students are introduced to key concepts about atrocity crimes and international criminal law and learn about the nature of victims and perpetrators of international crimes. The course focuses on the different types of institutions and policies used to provide justice, such as international courts and truth commissions, and explores contemporary “impunity gaps” in international justice, such as major power, corporate, and cyber crimes. This course situates international justice in contemporary security studies and international and domestic politics. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CJ 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CJ302 or PSY240, PSY241, senior class status or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CJ 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students will investigate a topic related to criminal justice in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CJ 489 Senior Thesis I

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMM 103 - Advertising Fundamentals


    An introductory course on the basic principles and practices of advertising. The focus will be on the history and effects of advertising on society and culture. This course will also explore how to plan and implement advertising programs through effective research, strategic planning, segmenting target audiences, creative copywriting and design, and understanding media planning and buying.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMM 106 - Media and Culture I


    This course is an introduction to the function and impact of mediated and mass communication in society. This course explores the history and contemporary landscape of radio, television and film. Related mass communication theories, new technologies, media effects and ethical issues are addressed.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMM 107 - Media and Culture II


    This course is an introduction to the function and impact of mediated and mass communication in society. This course explores the history and contemporary landscape of print media, the Internet, digital media and consumer culture. Related new technologies, ethical issues and media effects are addressed. May be taken without completing CMM106.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMM 115 - Social Media: Theory and Practice


    This course provides an overview of the role of social media in society. The course uses a research-based focus to examine the internet and digital communication technologies, exploring their intersection with other aspects of communication. Historical, cultural, and theoretical facets of social media are also covered. Students evaluate strategies for effective uses of social media. Additionally, students are expected to utilize social media clients and participate in online communities.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMM 203 - Public Relations


    Overview of basic principles, concepts, and relationship of theory to practice. Special emphasis on role in society, public opinion, effective strategies and tactics, process, identification of publics, publicity techniques, and effective use of media.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CMM 306 - Social Impact of the Media


    This course examines the role of media in modern culture. Topics include the effects of media on socialization, education, political choice and process, formation and development of beliefs, attitudes and behavior. Students additionally engage in complicated examinations of media texts and their connections to appropriate political, social and economic issues.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMM 101 or SOC 101 and sophomore class status, or permission of instructor.

    Credits: 3
  
  •  

    CMM 335 - Social Media and Marketing


    Students explore the rapidly changing world of social and digital media and how it is applied to the practice of marketing communication. After studying the concepts and theories behind communicating through digital media, students create social media marketing plans to support specific campaign initiatives through the use of these digital media.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CSC 101 - Introduction to Computer Science


    Examines the relationship of computer hardware, operating systems and applications software. Provides an introduction to principles of web design, networking, and the Internet. Considers the impact of information technology on Society. Satisfies Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    Credits: 3
  
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    CSC 102 - Website Development and Programming


    Students learn the fundamentals of developing web-based applications, with an emphasis on client-side technologies (i.e., HTML, CSS, Javascript). Server-side programming and communication techniques are introduced.

    Credits: 3
 

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