Apr 21, 2019  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Listings By Department


Academic Resources - Endicott College

  •  

    EC 100 - CIS Transitions (Offered in Spain)


    This course addresses all first year students and offers support and efficient strategies to meet a variety of challenges that an academic setting poses. Students learn how to act efficiently and meaningfully in order to adjust and succeed in this new context. A large part of the course is dedicated to the teaching of study skills promoting students’ persistence and achievement. Students also develop the necessary social skills to set and realize their academic goals. In order to act appropriately and effectively in multicultural environments, students also practice intercultural skills.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    EC 200 - Keys Transitions


    This course addresses three main areas related to single parents in college: parenting, mentoring, & personal finances. Students are provided an opportunity to engage in a mentorship experience, where students act as mentors, and work with professional mentors related to their field of study. Maybe repeated for up to seven semesters for credit. Only three credits of this course can be applied towards free elective credits. Pass/Fail grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Member of Keys to Degrees program only. 

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    EC 400 - Senior Transition


    This course addresses three main areas related to seniors graduating from college and making a successful transition into the professional world. Topics covered include preparation for first full-time employment (such as benefits, workplace culture, and performance reviews),personal finances (including budgeting, credit, loans, taxes, etc.), and transitional concerns (such as renting apartments, leases and contracts, and graduate school options).  Pass/Fail grading.

    (Cr: 1)
  • Academic Resources - Honors

  •  

    HON 100 - Honors Seminar I


    A foundational seminar for honors students that examines the concept of “culture” from a range of perspectives drawn from the field of cultural studies. Students read and interpret cultural texts, examine the culture of their academic discipline, and engage in field-based activities that apply theory to practice. High standards of academic reading, writing, and discussion are expected throughout the course, and students are asked to complete substantial papers, presentations, and research projects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Acceptance in the Endicott Scholars Program. Satisfies the ENG 112 Critical Reading and Writing II core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HON 200 - Honors Seminar III


    For students who join the Endicott Scholars program after their freshman year, this course examines the concept of “culture” from a range of perspectives drawn from the field of cultural studies. Students read and interpret cultural texts, examine the culture of their academic discipline, and engage in field-based activities that apply theory to practice. High standards of academic reading, writing, and discussion are expected throughout the course, and students are asked to complete substantial papers, presentations, and research projects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Acceptance in the Endicott Scholars Program. Students may not enroll in this class if they have completed HON 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HON 350 - Honors Seminar


    Focusing on different themes each semester, this upper level honors seminar builds on the academic foundation of HON100, and HON200, enabling students to explore concepts and ideas across academic disciplines. Course readings and writings are aimed at the advanced honors student and reflect high academic ability. The course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new. Satisfies a core elective requirement only.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Acceptance into the Endicott Scholars Program and completion of either HON100 or HON200.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HON 400 - Senior Honors Seminar


    A culminating experience for students in the Endicott Scholars Program, this course asks students to reflect on their college experience and their participation in the honors program, while giving students some foundational information for life after college. Pass/Fail grading.

    (Cr: 1)
  • Accounting

  •  

    ACC 175 - Financial Accounting


    Introduces students to basic accounting concepts and principles used in today’s business world.  Emphasis is placed on the preparation of financial statements and maintenance of accounting records throughout the accounting cycle.  Other topics within the framework of this course include the valuation of inventory, basic principles of internal control, accounting for the acquisition, depreciation and disposal of fixed assets, and current liabilities.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 185 - Managerial Accounting


    Continues to develop the foundation for a thorough understanding of basic accounting principles.  Emphasis is placed on the accounting issues that are relevant to the corporate form of business organization including, but not limited to, long-term liabilities, investments, dividends, and retained earnings.  Other topics within the framework of this course include cash flow statements, and an introduction to cost accounting concepts and systems including budgetary planning.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 175.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 205 - Financial Accounting and Analysis


    Highlights the accounting and financial concepts needed to support management decision-making. Examines the elements of financial statements, with particular emphasis on the fundamental principles that guide financial reporting. The course also focuses on measurement issues that managers must understand to make good financial decisions. This course is for non-business majors only.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 300 - Accounting Information Systems


    Provides a basic knowledge of how accounting information systems (AIS) function in today’s business environment. Transaction flowcharting and internal controls of the revenue, expenditure and conversion cycles are covered in detail. Other topics include business process modeling, data management including file vs. relational databases and the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 110 or equivalent competency.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 301 - Intermediate Accounting I


    This first in a series of three courses in intermediate accounting (ACC 301, ACC 302, and ACC 303) expands upon the principles covered in first year accounting and provides the foundation for students to advance to higher level subjects in financial accounting. The series focuses on how accounting as an information system can be used to generate a transparent, consistent and comparable presentation of a business’s financial condition. Students learn the fundamentals of financial statement analysis, including the use of horizontal, vertical and ratio analysis, to evaluate financial strength and performance. The conceptual framework of accounting, the accounting process, uses and relationships between financial statements and the asset side of the balance sheet are also covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 175.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 302 - Intermediate Accounting II


    This second in a series of three intermediate accounting courses (ACC 301, ACC 302, and ACC 303) furthers the student’s knowledge of financial accounting practices, increases a student’s understanding of a company’s assets and begins a discussion of liabilities.  Students study the recording and disclosure requirements for inventories, long-lived operational assets and investments, which also serve as financial instruments for an organization.  The course concludes with a presentation of recording and disclosure requirements for current and long-term liabilities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 301.

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    ACC 303 - Intermediate Accounting III



    This third and final class in a series of three intermediate accounting courses (ACC 301, ACC 302, and ACC 303) completes the student’s intermediate knowledge of financial accounting practices. In this class students study the reporting and disclosure requirements for more complex accounting topics that include leases, accounting for income taxes and pensions, and shareholders’ equity, including share-based compensation and various earnings per share (EPS) computations. Other financial reporting issues discussed include accounting changes and error corrections.     

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 302.

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    ACC 315 - Cost Accounting


    Provides basic knowledge of costing systems and methods of costing and develops problem solving skills related to cost and management accounting. Topics include cost estimation, elements of cost, inventory planning and control, activity based costing, job and contract costing, process costing, joint product and by-product costing, breakeven analysis and budgeting.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 175.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 325 - Tax Accounting


    Provides a basic knowledge of the United States federal taxation system and its operation, including a fundamental understanding of the current law, principles and practice relating to taxation of individuals and other entities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 175.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 350 - Auditing


    Examines the role of auditing in financial reporting and corporate governance. Topics include the purpose of auditing and assurance, the importance of auditor independence as well as the techniques and procedures in carrying out financial statement audits. The agency theory is used to explain the demand for auditing and corporate governance and the related issues in contemporary business settings are investigated.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 300, BUS 302.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 401 - Advanced Accounting


    A continuation and expansion of Intermediate Accounting II, this course covers accounting principles for consolidations and combinations, accounting for branches, accounting for liquidations, accounting for nonprofit organizations, and other selected topics.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 303.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 425 - Corporate Tax Accounting


    The second course in tax accounting, examines concepts and principles of federal taxation as they apply to business enterprises including proprietorships, partnerships, LLC’s, S corporations and corporations. Topics include: tax policy, tax planning, measuring taxable income, basis and cost recovery, property transactions and the alternative minimum tax.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 325.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 450 - Advanced Topics in Accounting


    Building upon the foundations laid in cost accounting (ACC 315) and auditing (ACC 350) the course covers a variety of traditional and contemporary topics of cost accounting and auditing from strategic decision-making perspectives. Subjects include alternative costs and cost allocation, capacity and demand analysis, activity-based costing, performance measurement and compensation, and capital budgeting decisions. Cases that deal with key issues and applications of important auditing methodology will be examined from the perspective of students preparing to be managers and those preparing to be auditors..

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 315, ACC 350.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 460 - Accounting Information for Decision Makers


    Equips students with the skills and knowledge to design and use effective management accounting information systems to both plan and control business activities in organizations. Topics include concepts related to management and decision support systems, business intelligence systems and enterprise information systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 300, ACC 315.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment. The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors. A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    ACC 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 370, senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ACC 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students will investigate a topic related to accounting, in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I.  Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • American Studies

  •  

    AMS 101 - American Popular Culture


    Explores the many forms that American culture has taken throughout the country’s history, including bestsellers and beliefs, myths and movies, legends and laws. Students will learn to recognize and interpret cultural symbols and to better understand the complex world in which they live. Satisfies World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AMS 150 - American Sign Language I


    Addresses issues related to deaf culture and cultural diversity in the United States, including historical and theoretical approaches to signed languages. It examines the principal theories of sign language learning utilizing the two classroom techniques: expressive (speaking) as well as receptive (listening). The course is designed to build classroom communities that respect American Sign Language, the native language of the majority of deaf people in North America.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AMS 151 - American Sign Language II


    This course builds on the language skills developed in AMS 150 with additional attention given to issues of deaf culture and cultural diversity in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on expressive (signing) where participants can demonstrate their competence in ASL. The course is designed to build classroom communities that respect American Sign Language, the native language of the majority of deaf people in North America.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: AMS 150 or prior coursework in American Sign Language.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AMS 203 - Geography of North America


    An in-depth examination of the physical, cultural, human and economic patterns of North America as they relate to specific geographic and political regions. The course includes related cartography projects.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Arabic

  •  

    ARA 101 - Elementary Arabic I


    Introduces students to spoken and written modern standard Arabic.  Students learn the Arabic alphabet, rules of grammar, verb tenses, pronouns, and common phrases while developing basic reading and communication abilities.  Course also introduces students to the diverse cultures within the Arabic-speaking world. Satisfies World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ARA 102 - Elementary Arabic II


    A continuation of Elementary Arabic I, this course enable students to further their Arabic speaking, writing and reading abilities, while deepening their understanding of cultures within the Arabic-speaking world. Satisfies World Cultures General Education requirement.


     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ARA 101.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Art Therapy

  •  

    ART 229 - Specific Populations: Arts and Expressive Therapy


    Within a studio setting students build upon their knowledge of the use of creative arts therapy materials and methods and apply such techniques for use with a variety of different human populations. Populations include groups and individuals of different ages, settings, and medical or psychological diagnoses. Students assess, design, and critique creative therapeutic approaches and techniques as well as explore the role of group dynamics and group experiences. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education Requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 110 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 331 - Art and Social Action


    This course is designed as a service learning course that explores the intersection and practice of social activism within art therapy and community art, with the creative arts therapies and mental health counseling. Issues of culture, social justice, and oppression will be addressed along with the response of community-based actions and initiatives taken by creative arts therapists, artists, and service providers. National and international initiatives and projects are studied. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART110 or PSY100 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Athletic Training

  •  

    AT 100 - Internship


    Students are required to accumulate observation hours in the Endicott College Athletic Training Room and additional hours during the January intercession at an allied health or conditioning facility. All sites are researched as part of Athletic Training I (AT 101) and approved by the clinical coordinator of athletic training.

    (Cr: 2)
  •  

    AT 101 - Athletic Training I


    This course introduces students to the domains of athletic training. Emphasis is on prevention of injury, medical terminology, and basic evaluative and taping techniques.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    AT 200 - Clinical Education Experience


    A sophomore clinical education experience under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer in an approved setting. Emphasis is placed on prevention and management of injury. Students gain experience with individual and team sports. All clinical placements are at the discretion of the clinical coordinator of athletic training. Includes a minimum hour/day requirement and weekly lecture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 101.

    (Cr: 2)
  •  

    AT 201 - Clinical Education Experience


    A sophomore year clinical education experience under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer at an approved setting. Emphasis is placed on recognition and management of common athletic injuries and illnesses. All clinical placements are at the discretion of the clinical coordinator of athletic training. Includes a minimum hour/day requirement and weekly lecture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 200.

    (Cr: 2)
  •  

    AT 203 - Athletic Training II


    This course provides students with learning experiences in prevention, recognition, and treatment of specific sports injuries and illnesses. Emphasis is on mechanism of injury, biomechanics, and management procedures. Major anatomical components are also discussed. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 101, BIO 201.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    AT 215 - Exercise Physiology


    An examination of various physiological processes and the effect acute exercise bouts, long term conditioning, and ergogenic aids have on them. Current research in exercise science is relied upon heavily to help students keep abreast of this ever-changing field. Satisfies the Writing Designated Core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 101 or BIO 201.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AT 301 - Evaluation of Injury I


    An intensive study of the assessment techniques utilized in the evaluation of athletic injuries and illnesses occurring to the lower extremity. Students must be able to apply and demonstrate evaluative skills and their knowledge of anatomy and physiology related to sports medicine. Management of specific injuries and illnesses is also discussed.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    AT 302 - Evaluation of Injury II


    An intensive study of the assessment techniques utilized in the evaluation of athletic injuries and illnesses occurring to the upper extremity. Students must be able to apply and demonstrate evaluative skills and their knowledge of anatomy and physiology related to sports medicine. Management of specific injuries and illnesses is also discussed. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203, BIO 201, BIO 202.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    AT 304 - Kinesiology


    The study of biomechanical principles of human movement and locomotion including specific kinesiological functions of muscles and joints, characteristics of normal posture and gait analysis, and introduction to common injuries to the joints. Laboratory is required. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    AT 305 - Therapeutic Exercise


    Introduction to basic theories and applications of exercise rehabilitation as they relate to orthopedic and sports injuries. Pathophysiological response to injury and basic evaluative skills form the foundation that allows students to design and implement exercise programs for specific sports injuries. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    AT 306 - Administration of Athletic Training Programs


    This course probes the various areas an individual must be familiar with to manage an athletic training program. Topics include legal issues, management principles, and fiscal policies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AT 307 - Therapeutic Modalities


    Introduction to basic theories and applications as they relate to orthopedic and sports injuries. Physiologic behavior of pain and its effect on sports injury forms the foundation to understanding the effects of heat, cold, electrical stimulation currents, and other physical modalities. Includes lecture and laboratory.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AT 308 - Structural Kinesiology


    This course provides the student with lecture and laboratory study of human tissue histology and musculoskeletal anatomy. The focus is on gaining knowledge of anatomical components and applying this information to a clinical setting. Emphasis is placed on functional understanding of bones, muscles, ligaments, blood supply, innervation, and disability after injury.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    AT 310 - Athletic Training Practicum


    A junior year clinical education experience that combines clinical hours with lecture information and allows students to demonstrate and refine their evaluative, rehabilitative, and educational skills. Students apply knowledge gained in the classroom to the clinical setting. All clinical hours must be obtained at an approved setting under a certified athletic trainer. All students are placed at the discretion of the clinical coordinator of athletic training. Includes a minimum hour/day requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 201.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AT 311 - Athletic Training Practicum


    A junior clinical education experience that combines clinical hours with lecture information and allows students to demonstrate and refine their evaluative, rehabilitative, and educational skills. Students must apply and demonstrate skills pertaining to all domains in athletic training. All clinical hours must be obtained at an approved setting under a certified athletic trainer. All students are placed at the discretion of the clinical coordinator of athletic training. Includes a minimum hour/day requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 310.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AT 330 - Pharmacological Perspectives in Athletic Training


    This course is designed to strengthen students’ understanding of pharmacology as it relates to the management of athletic injuries. A number of topics are discussed, including federal and state regulations, documentation, as well as indications, contraindications, and adverse reactions of a number of pharmaceuticals. In addition, ergogenic aids in relation to enhancing sports performance are presented.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 203.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AT 402 - Clinical Education Experience


    Emphasis is placed on refining evaluative and rehabilitative skills and expanding the students’ experiences outside of the traditional primary setting. All clinical placements must be approved by the clinical coordinator of athletic training. Includes a minimum hour/day requirement and weekly lecture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 311.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AT 480 - Clinical Education Experience


    A semester-long clinical education experience under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer at an approved setting. Emphasis is placed on refinement and demonstration of clinical skills in prevention, evaluation, management, rehabilitation, and administration. Formal seminars are included to strengthen and evaluate clinical skills and professional competencies. All students are placed at the discretion of the clinical coordinator of athletic training.
     


     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 301, AT 302, AT 305, AT 307, AT 311.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    AT 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    AT 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to athletic training in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Autism and Applied Behavior Analysis

  •  

    ABA 145 - Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders


    This course will provide a framework for understanding the developmental differences in children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), and highlights the heterogeneity of the spectrum. The definitions and critical features of autism spectrum disorders are delineated and learning, behavioral, and social characteristics of autism are highlighted.  Controversies in the definition, etiology, and treatment of autism spectrum disorders are reviewed.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ABA 280 - Introduction to the Basic Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis


    This course is designed as an introduction to the discipline of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and its’ application to the treatment of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. ABA is the design, implementation, and evaluation of environmental modifications to produce socially significant improvement in human behavior and includes the use of direct observation, measurement, and functional analysis of the relations between environment and behavior. ABA uses antecedent stimuli and consequences, based on the findings of descriptive and functional analysis, to produce practical change.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ABA 310 - Assessment in Behavior Analysis


    This course introduces students to issues related to the use of objective measurement procedures, data analysis, single-subject experimental design, and functional assessment/analysis.  The primary focus of this course is functional assessment and Analysis, with specail emphasis on the three general approaches currently in use: Indirect or anecdotal methods (checklists, rating scales, and questionnaires), descriptive analysis (scatter plot, ABC analysis, interval and time sampling methods), and functional analysis (experimental methods, brief functional analyses).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ABA 280 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ABA 332 - Advanced Topics in Behavior Analysis


    Within this course, students review a number of advanced issues in behavior analysis related to ethical principles and professional conduct, and the way in which standards for evidence based practices impact our discipline. Students also review issues related to staff management and supervision, along with intervention and behavior change considerations and schedules of reinforcement and behavior reduction techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ABA 280 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ABA 400 - Practicum in Autism and Applied Behavior Analysis I


    Students gain practical experience in the design and implementation of skill acquisition and behavior reduction programs with children diagnosed on the autism spectrum.  All students will work at the Futures Behavior Therapy School in Beverly, MA, attend and complete agency orientation, meet agency guidelines for volunteers and/or employees, and be supervised by employees of the Futures Behavior Therapy School (Futures) who serve as adjunct faculty within the Institute for Behavioral Services (IBS) at Endicott.  Approximately 300-400 practicum hours (of the 500 total hours required for certification in BCBA) are completed during this practicum experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status and ABA 280, ABA 310, ABA 332, ABA 345.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    ABA 450 - Practicum in Autism and Applied Behavior Analysis II


    Students gain practical experience in the design and implementation of skill acquisition and behavior reduction programs with children diagnosed on the autism spectrum.  All students work at the Futures Behavior Therapy School in Beverly, MA, attend and complete agency orientation, meet agency guidelines for volunteers and/or employees, and will be supervised by employees of the Futures Behavior Therapy School (Futures) who serve as adjunct faculty within the Institute for Behavioral Services (IBS) at Endicott.   Approximately 100-200 practicum hours (of the 500 total hours required for certification in BCBA) are completed during this practicum experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ABA 400.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Bioengineering

  •  

    BEN 210 - Biomaterials


    This course is an introduction to biomaterial design across a wide range of applications. Biocompatibility and immunogenicity of different classes of materials are examined. The course discusses regulatory concerns in medical device design and the current biomaterials with FDA approval. The foundational concepts of materials science are applied to materials used in medical applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 102 and CHE 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BEN 320 - Biomedical Instrumentation


    A first course in biomedical instrumentation and data acquisition. This course covers the foundations of biomedical electronics, sensors, data acquisition, measurements, and basic circuit design. Common techniques and software applications (LabVIEW) are explored in both theoretical and practical applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BEN 305.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BEN 340 - Engineering Physiology


    This course is an applied course in human physiology. In addition to understanding the anatomy of each system, the course describes the physiological systems of the body in quantitative terms. Mathematical models such as Hodgkin-Huxley are introduced, and simulations are used to explore how physiological systems interconnect.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 102 and MTH 237.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BEN 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters)

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    BEN 401 - Tissue Engineering


    This course explores the growing field of tissue engineering with examples of replacing both soft and hard tissues. Students must consider the benefits and drawbacks of synthetic and biological scaffolds for different applications. Students apply knowledge obtained from reviews of recent literature towards real-world organ replacement solutions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BEN 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BEN 420 - Biomechanics


    An introduction to biological mechanics. This course covers the foundations of statics, dynamics, and kinematics necessary to understand and model the movement and deformation of various tissues. Applications of the biomechanics of different tissue types will be explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 330 and PHY 201.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BEN 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    BEN 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II. Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects. The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BEN 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to bioengineering in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the design project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Biology and Biotechnology

  •  

    BIO 101 - Human Biology


    An introduction to the science of biology by exploring human anatomy and physiology. Students will relate the major systems of the body to maintaining their own bodies in a healthy state. The impact of current health issues on the human body will be discussed. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement. Cannot be taken by students who have taken BIO 201 and/or BIO 202.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 102/102L - Principles of Biology I and Lab


    This introductory biology course covers the organization and integration of biological molecules, cells, tissues, and physiological systems in order to understand the overall function of living things. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    BIO 103/103L - Principles of Biology II and Lab


    Topics in this introductory biology course include phylogeny and taxonomy, evolution and genetics, biological diversity and ecology. Biological domains consisting of prokaryotic and eukaryotic life forms, and including comparisons of their morphologies and interactions with the environment are surveyed. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.


     

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 102 preferred but not required.

    (Cr: 4)

  •  

    BIO 115/115L - Biosphere and Lab


    An integrated approach to understanding the Earth, environment, and its processes. A presentation of basic principles and applications of earth science, chemistry, and biology as they relate to the Earth and real world. Basic principles from the science disciplines are investigated through the laboratory experience. Class, three hours per week, 3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab). Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    BIO 130/130L - Principles of Ecology and Lab


    Examines the interrelationships of organisms and their environments. The broad subject of ecology focuses upon the interactions of plants and animals, including humans, with each other and with their non-living world. Three levels of ecology are studied: (1) individuals, (2) populations, (3) communities and ecosystems. This class provides an overview of the science of ecology for the informed citizen, and also a foundation for further work in ecology, marine biology and environmental science. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    BIO 201/201L - Anatomy and Physiology I and Lab


    A study of the human organism relating structure and function. The approach is an integrated one, stressing interrelationships and feedback systems: organic molecules, the cell, cellular respiration, tissues, skin, bones, muscles, and the nervous system. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    BIO 202/202L - Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab


    A study of the human organism relating structure and function. Topics include: the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system, endocrinology, digestion, metabolism, the urinary system, water and electrolyte balance, and the reproductive systems. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    BIO 205 - Plant Biology


    This course introduces students to essential elements of the plant kingdom from basic plant anatomy, plant physiology, plant systematics, and plant ecology. The course is intended to provide students with a basic understanding of the major vegetation biomes (landscape groupings), plant modifications to survive in these biomes, and how plant communities structure themselves. Students are responsible for identifying and collecting plant material from the surrounding ecosystems as well as maintaining a live plant collection in the College’s greenhouse. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.  

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 210 - Biostatistics


    Statistics are critical to understanding data and the implications of interpreting data analysis results. Students in this one-semester course are introduced to data, data collection, experimental design, and hypothesis testing. Students are then instructed on how to make informed and proper choices of statistical tests for different types of biological and environmental data sets. Students complete the course by evaluating and interpreting data analyses and providing rationale for choices and interpretations made.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 225 - Introduction to Biotechnology


    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of biotechnology and to the application of biotechnology methodologies in various fields. We consider specific topics related to human health, disease research, agricultural biotechnology, bioremediation, nanotechnology, genomics, and others - all of which affect society. Critical evaluation of biotechnology, e.g. ethical considerations, inherent caveats, and opportunities for improvements emphasized. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 102.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 226 - Marine Biology


    Students study basic science applied to the marine environment, including an emphasis on organismal classification, structure, function, and ecology. Students learn an ecosystem approach that integrates organismal diversity with challenges imposed by the environment, and learn how humans impact, preserve and utilize marine life. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 240 - Science and Society


    This course examines current issues in the relevance of scientific inquiry. Students investigate selected subjects with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field. Students observe and summarize relationships, formulate and test hypotheses, and study connections among hypotheses, formal models, predictions, and actual results. Examples of topics that may be explored include consumerism, health, media, and advertising. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 242 - World Disease


    The study of the biology of major diseases that impact our society and other parts of the world, especially underdeveloped and overpopulated regions. The course examines the biological, social, historical, and economic problems involved in eradication, prevention, and cure. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 292/292L - Microbiology and Lab


    An introduction to microorganisms, including bacteria, single-celled eukaryotes, and viruses.  Specific areas covered include cultivation, detection using conventional and molecular approaches, cell biology and metabolism, genetics, virulence and infectious disease, microbial ecology, genetic engineering, and industrial applications. Laboratory work (separate syllabus and component) involves cultivation and analysis of microorganisms. (Lecture: 3 cr.; Lab: 1 cr.)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Two BIO courses with associated labs.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    BIO 311/311L - Genes and Genomes and Lab


    This course focuses on the power and importance of genetic information. Classic Mendelian, genetics, and DNA replication are covered. Genomics, the study of an organism’s complete genetic make-up is focal. The course explores all steps of the next-generation sequencing protocol with hands-on experience in the sequencing center.  Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. (Lecture: 3 cr.; Lab 1 cr.)

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 102 and BIO 103, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    BIO 320/320L - Cell and Molecular Biology and Lab


    A study of the cellular and molecular components associated with cell structure, cell function, and cell regulation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Mechanisms including bioenergetics, cell signaling, cell cycle, development, and gene expression are emphasized. Key experiments in various aspects of the field are explored. The laboratory experience emphasizes techniques associated with cell culture, protein analysis, DNA analysis, immunology, and bioinformatics. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Two BIO courses with associated labs.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    BIO 326/326L - Immunology and Lab


    The body’s defense against harmful pathogens and genetic diseases relies upon proper functioning of the immune system. In this course, students learn the fundamental aspects of both innate and adaptive immunity, and discuss topics including hypersensitivity reactions, immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, transplantation, and cancer.  Current immunological methods are also discussed in a laboratory component of the course, which offers hands-on training with state-of-the-art techniques. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. (Lecture: 3 cr.; Lab: 1 cr.) Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 102 and BIO 292, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    BIO 335 - Pathophysiology


    A study of the alterations of normal anatomy and physiology that result in diseases. Topics are organized according to body systems. Theories of etiology, the progression of the disorder, clinical symptoms, and differential diagnosis are discussed. This course is aimed at the future health professional, medical researcher, or athletic trainer, and includes analysis of case studies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 202 or permission of instructor. 

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 340 - Bioinformatics


    The deluge of DNA and protein sequence information due to genome sequencing projects has given rise to bioinformatics, a burgeoning new industry. The course trains students in computer technology, to understand, and interpret biological and biochemical data. We focus on database and sequence comparisons, genomics and proteomics analysis, computer simulation and modeling, utilization of software and hardware, and laboratory data collection and analysis. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Two BIO courses with associated labs..

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 350 - Human Embryology and Developmental Biology


    This course explores the development of the human embryo and fetus at the molecular, cellular and macroscopic level. There is an emphasis on the relationship between normal processes, congenital conditions, and those conditions caused by teratogens.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Limited to students majoring in biotechnology, nursing, and athletic training, or permission of the instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters)

    (Cr: 1)

  •  

    BIO 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    BIO 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BIO 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students will investigate a topic related to biology and biotechnology in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Business

  •  

    BUS 110 - Business Computers I


    Provides current introduction to computer system concepts and personal computers in particular. Implications of information technology on business are explored. Problem-solving skills using word processing and presentation software and the World Wide Web are developed.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 115 - Business Computers II


    Builds on the understanding of information technology and its impact on business. Emphasis is on using advanced presentation, database, and Web creation software to solve problems in business.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 110 or equivalent competency.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 120 - Business Fundamentals I


    Half of a two-semester integrative interdisciplinary course (with BUS 121) focusing on the interdependencies in business while providing a foundation for advanced study and a framework for defining internship and career direction. Readings, exercises, team projects, and the first internship experience are used to develop the analytical, interpersonal, and communication skills required for business success.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 121 - Business Fundamentals II


    Half of a two-semester integrative interdisciplinary course (with BUS 120), focuses on the interdependencies in business while providing a foundation for advanced study and a framework for defining internship and career direction. Readings, exercises, team projects, and the first internship experience are used to develop the analytical, interpersonal, and communication skills required for business success.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 120.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 125 - Business Fundamentals for Non-Business Majors


    Provides students beginning a minor in the School of Business with knowledge and skill required to be successful in completing both required and elective courses in the minor. Topics include basic economics, global business considerations, business ethics, business formation, management, marketing, product development and distribution, accounting, financial management, and information technology. The course is not open to students majoring in the School of Business unless permission is given by the dean of the school of business.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 200 - Marketing


    An introductory overview of marketing in the 21st century. Techniques for the application of key marketing frameworks and tools for analyzing customers, competition, and marketing strengths and weaknesses are examined. Emphasis is placed on methods for the selection of target markets. Strategies that integrate product, price, promotion, and place to meet the needs of a target market are studied.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Sophomore class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 210 - Finance


    An introduction to finance including organization, taxes, capital markets, the commercial banking system, interest rates, financial analysis, financial forecasting, working capital management, marketable securities, accounts receivables, inventories, and short-term credit markets. Students will use financial computers and/or software applications to apply concepts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 175.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 270 - Communicating in Business


    Develop the critical oral and written managerial communication skills required of professionals.  Students learn the characteristics of effective business communication, including the need to identify audiences and their preferred communication styles.  Written, oral, and interpersonal communication skills are built through a variety of exercises that include crafting email, letters, memos, executive summaries, and visual aids. Students learn how to incorporate evidence and effectively structure communications to deliver negative and positive business news, how to contend with ethical considerations, and how to communicate persuasively. Focus on the use of tables, figures, and graphs to tighten and enhance all forms of communication is included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 121, ENG 111, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 300 - Entrepreneurship


    Examines historic evolution, economic, and Societal impact of the entrepreneurship process from conception to implementation of a new venture. Focus is on attributes of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial teams, and their search and assessment of various resources to convert opportunities into profitable businesses.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 175, ACC 205 or BUS 210, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 301 - Entrepreneurship for Non-Business Majors


    The goal of this course is to provide non-business majors with the framework needed to create their own businesses. The course will explore the entrepreneurial process and examine the skills necessary to convert ideas and opportunities into a profitable business. The course will culminate in practical application of the creation and implementation of a business idea by entrepreneurial teams.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 302 - Legal Environment for the Business Manager


    This course gives students a working knowledge of the legal system and the law and how it affects day-to-day operations of businesses all over the world. Topics include: Small business and the law, the judicial process, trials and alternative dispute resolution, constitutional law, the administrative agency, contracts and liability, debtor/creditor Relationships, labor law, employment discrimination and sexual harassment, environmental law, consumer protection, federal securities and anti-trust law, and international corporations and the law.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 121 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 303 - International Business


    An overview of the environment in which international businesses compete, this course introduces the student to the impact of culture and political economy on business decision making, the economics and politics of international trade and investment, the nature of the international monetary system, the strategies and structures that characterize successful international enterprises, and the Special role that each business function plays within a firm operating globally.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 305 - Human Resource Management


    This course examines employee-employer Relationships in the work place today. Policy areas covered are: job design, recruiting, employee selection, placement, job training and career development, performance evaluation, compensation strategies, incentives, and benefits. There is also discussion of current economic situations as they impact the work place today, including labor/management relations.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 307 - Market Research


    This course discusses the tools and techniques available for gathering, analyzing, and using information to aid marketing decision making. It covers topics such as problem definition, research design formulation, measurement, research instrument development, sampling techniques, data collection, data interpretation and analysis, and presentation of research findings.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 309 - Project Management


    Preparation to meet the variety of communication demands made on the business professional as they are engaged in coordination of disparate and similar functional groups in product or process development. The course draws from the areas of project management, business communication, and rhetoric to develop oral and written communication competencies for a range of contemporary business contexts.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 311 - Corporate Finance


    Examines more advanced topics in finance, including option pricing and the use of options in corporate finance. Students use financial modeling to solve problems in capital budgeting and mergers and acquisitions. In addition, some topics in international finance are covered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 320 - Organizational Behavior


    A comprehensive investigation into the dynamics of behavior in organizations. Examines individual and group behavior, motivation, leadership styles, conflict, organizational culture, and the process of change in organizations. Through case studies and group exercise, the course emphasizes an analytical approach. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 325 - Operations Management


    An introduction to operations and production management, this course examines the evolution of the modern operations function, the design of systems and scheduling, the management of materials, and the provision of services in contemporary businesses. All facets of an enterprise, including employees, processes, customers, and suppliers are looked at as a system.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 327 - Supply Chain Management


    Supply chain management includes the design, planning, execution, control, and monitoring of supply chain activities with the objective of creating net value, building a competitive infrastructure, leveraging worldwide logistics, synchronizing supply with demand, and measuring and improving supplier performance globally. Students will examine a complete overview of material flow from internal and external suppliers throughout the enterprise and to the end user. Topics include managing the comprehensive supply chain, procurement and strategic sourcing, supplier relationship management, outsourcing, contract management, and negotiation.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 330 - Consumer Behavior


    Study of the consumer as a decision maker. Social and psychological influences on purchasing decisions are examined with emphasis on their implications for retail marketing strategy. Topics include: external and internal influences on consumer lifestyles, the nature of consumer motivation, the purchase decision process as it relates to the consumption of consumer goods and services, and appropriate marketing responses.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 335 - Managing Innovation


    The fundamental process underlying the emergence of new enabling or disruptive technology and its effects on existing business and society are examined. Both qualitative and quantitative methods for technology assessment are reviewed. An emphasis is placed on developing technology-forecasting research.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 340 - International Finance


    Examines the balance of payments in relation to domestic macroeconomics, the mechanics of the foreign exchange market, and the benefits of international diversification and hedging strategies used by portfolio managers and multinational corporations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 350 - Global Marketing Management


    Focus is on the unique problems associated with managing marketing operations across national borders. Topics include: the impact of culture on the global marketing environment; how to identify global market opportunities for an existing enterprise or a new venture; how to apply industry analysis, assessment of risk, and new customer identification techniques in an international context; and how to develop and implement effective comprehensive marketing strategies on a global scale.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 354 - Entrepreneurial Finance


    Examines issues related to funding entrepreneurial firms at all stages of their existence. How to identify worthy business opportunities, raise and structure financing, and ultimately harvest returns are covered. Specific topics include: venture capital markets, deal structuring, valuations, later stage financing, going public, and other harvesting methods. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 205 or BUS 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 355 - Risk Management


    Addresses present and emerging needs in a variety of industries and professional fields. Provides an overview of systematic responses used to manage potential threats to individuals, organizations, and agencies through the use of strategies and procedures engineered to minimize consequences and maximize opportunities. Using a risk management model to identify and assess risk, implement strategies, and evaluate outcomes, students will understand how properly designed risk management processes are used to protect individuals, organizations, or agencies against financial, physical, legal, and other damages, including risk associated with terrorism and natural disaster.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 360 - Retail Management


    Examines the professional management of various types of retail institutions from the perspective of a professional manager and from that of an entrepreneur. Includes a topical analysis of the retail mix: organization and personnel policies, merchandise selection and pricing issues, display and store layout, promotional policy, and services retailing. Emphasis is on comprehensive planning, control, and integration of high performance retail strategy.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 365 - Business, the Environment, and Sustainability


    Examination of environmental and social consequences of industrial society and managerial responses with emphasis on the effect of sustainability on corporate performance.  The impacts, in both domestic and global contexts, of current trends in industrial operations and government policies on health, equity, and environmental sustainability will be considered. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 370 - Business Analysis and Research


    A prerequisite for the semester internship, focus is on translating a business problem into a research project. Includes approaches to industry and internal analysis, ways to identify relevant data and appropriate sources, primary and secondary data collection, methods of data analysis, and effective interpretation and presentation of findings. Examples of published research in business are analyzed to provide a foundation for the creation of an effective research design proposal for an actual business problem as the final deliverable in the course. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 200, BUS 121, BUS 270, junior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 375 - Financial Modeling


    Combines knowledge of financial theory, mathematics, Excel, and Visual Basic Applications (VBA) to develop simple to sophisticated spreadsheet models in several major areas of finance.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    BUS 380 - Small Business Management


    This course focuses on both the entrepreneurial aspect and continuing management of a small business (fewer than 100 employees). The presumption is that the business already exists and therefore the focus is on issues of management facing a small business. Topics include  leadership, decision making, management, marketing, financial controls, and other processes to insure the successful start up and long-term health of the business enterprise.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 381 - Nonprofit Management


    Students will develop an informed perspective of selected theories about the nature of nonprofit organizations and their role in governance, as well as key issues affecting the sector and the implications for practice. Students will address collective operational and organizational problems. This course also reviews trends affecting the differentiation between private, public, and nonprofit sectors.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 403 - Integrated Marketing Communications


    Advanced study of the major marketing communication functions including advertising, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, and personal selling. Application and integration of these various functions in developing effective campaign strategies and programs are included.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 415 - Business Negotiation


    Provides students with techniques for becoming skillful negotiators in a wide range of settings. The framework and fundamental steps of negotiating, including how to develop an effective negotiating action plan are examined. Students will be introduced to current theory surrounding the negotiation process.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 425 - Business and Society


    Examines social and ethical challenges faced by managers and the potential of such challenges to impact the business institution, its stakeholders, investors, the community, and society. Using readings and case studies, situations where business strategy and public policy or personal interest overlap are examined to develop a conceptual framework to guide socially responsible individual and corporate problem solving and decision making in business.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 430 - Investments


    Examines basic trading strategies using stocks, bonds, and options. Methods for valuing these securities are explored and the risk/return characteristics assessed in the light of modern portfolio theory. Bond and equity portfolios are constructed using various risk management methods including futures and options.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 440 - Topics in Real Estate Seminar


    Explores in depth an aspect of owning and operating real estate as an investment. Topics and course descriptions will change from semester to semester. Examples of topics may include the financing, development and/or management of real estate properties, and issues related to owning and managing real estate investment trusts and portfolios. Students may take more than one section of this course providing the topic is different from one section to the next.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     ACC 175, ACC 205 or BUS 210, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 450 - Dynamics of Leadership


    An extensive look at the nature of leadership and the dilemmas facing leaders of people at work. In-depth analysis of the forces motivating the behavior of people working in ongoing and temporary groups. Includes problems of authority and influence, development of roles and norms, initiation of change, and dealing with resistance. Recognition of women’s and men’s parity in leadership opportunities as a major consideration. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 460 - Brand Management


    Recognizing the strategic importance of branding, this course examines theories and strategies for building, leveraging, and defending strong brands, and showcases current opportunities and challenges facing brand managers. Emphasis is placed on understanding psychological principles at the consumer level that will improve managerial decision making with respect to brands.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 200 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 475 - Business Strategy and Policy


    A culminating course in the business program, examines the challenge to top management presented by a new or expanding business. Students learn decision making for an organization experiencing growth and change. Topics include organization planning and strategy in a competitive environment. The student is asked, from the point of view of the senior manager, to integrate and apply the knowledge learned in accounting, finance, marketing, organizational behavior, etc., to develop a comprehensive strategy for a firm that can lead to competitive advantage and high performance results.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ACC 175, ACC 205 or BUS 210, or permission of the instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    BUS 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BUS 370, BUS 480 (as a prerequisite or corequisite), and senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    BUS 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to business, in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ECN 302 - Intermediate Microeconomics


    This course continues the study of microeconomics as the analytical study of individual behavior and markets. The topics of utility, profit maximization, supply and demand, elasticity, and forms of business enterprise are explored in mathematical and theoretical detail. The neoclassical microeconomic theory, used by economists today, is investigated including the many points of contention in microeconomic theory and alternative ideas.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECN 202.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Chemistry

  •  

    CHE 105/105L - General Chemistry I and Lab


    This course introduces inorganic, organic, and biochemistry, with emphasis on the life sciences, and includes the chemical basis for the most important body processes. No previous knowledge of chemistry is assumed. The laboratories cover the most basic and important techniques of chemical analysis, such as titration and pH determination, and introduce the student to chemical processes. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    High school chemistry and algebra or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    CHE 106/106L - General Chemistry II and Lab


    A continuation of General Chemistry I, covering nuclear chemistry, VSEPR theory, electrochemistry, chemistry of the environment, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, and properties of solutions. Class, three hours; lab two hours per week. (Lecture: 3 cr.; Lab 1 cr.).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHE 105 or equivalent.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    CHE 207/207L - Organic Chemistry I and Lab


    This course focuses on the processes of organic chemistry, with the goal of having the students develop a sound understanding of chemical reactivity and organic structure. In this course students attain a molecular perspective that is needed to effectively analyze chemical patterns, predict chemical reactivity, and visualize three dimensional chemical structures. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHE 105 and CHE 106.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    CHE 208/208L - Organic Chemistry II and Lab


    This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I and further focuses on the processes of organic chemistry. The semester includes the methods and instrumental techniques used to qualitatively analyze organic compounds and examines the relationships between organic molecules and biological processes. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHE 207.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    CHE 209/209L - Biochemistry and Lab


    Biochemistry deals mainly with the structure, function, and synthesis of biological macromolecules including composition, structure, and function of proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates. Important biochemical principles include structure-function correlation, chemical reactivity, kinetics and equilibrium, thermodynamics, membrane structure and function, as well as metabolic energy pathways. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. (Lecture: 3 cr.; Lab 1 cr.)



     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHE 207 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    CHE 230 - Forensic Science


    An introduction to forensic science. This course gives the student an understanding of the scientific method and covers the topics of physical evidence, crime scenes, microscopic fiber analysis, forensic serology, DNA as a scientific tool, finger printing, ballistics, and firearm analysis. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    High school biology or chemistry, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CHE 306 - Chemical Analysis and Instrumentation


    An examination of environmentally significant analytes utilizing techniques commonly used in air, soil, and water analysis including wet chemistry techniques and instrumental analysis. Topics covered include mass spectrometry, electroanalytical chemistry, chromatographic separations, atomic absorption spectrometry and emission spectroscopy. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHE 105, CHE 106.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Chinese

  •  

    CHI 101 - Elementary Chinese I


    Provides students who have no previous exposure to the language with a basic understanding of spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. Language instruction is integrated with fundamental material on Chinese society and culture. Satisfies World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CHI 102 - Elementary Chinese II


    A continuation of Elementary Chinese I, this course enables students to further their Chinese language speaking, writing, and reading abilities while deepening their knowledge of Chinese society and culture. Satisfies World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHI 101.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CHI 201 - Intermediate Chinese I


    Continues to develop students’ basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing through the use of more complex grammatical forms and longer sentence patterns. Emphasis will be on improving Chinese pronunciation and tones and deepening understanding of Chinese culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHI 102.

    (Cr: 3
  •  

    CHI 202 - Intermediate Chinese II


    Students improve their conversational skills and ability to read original texts in Chinese, and they write short compositions in Chinese on designated subjects. Students will learn more characters/vocabulary and practice speaking and writing with more complex sentence patterns. Cultural and political material from newspapers and other sources will be introduced on a regular basis.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHI 201.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Coaching Certification

    Communication

  •  

    CMM 100 - Media Aesthetics


    An introductory course in the theory of aesthetics as applied to film, television, photography, print, and digital media. The goal of this class is for students - as media creators and consumers - to develop a vocabulary for articulating how various aesthetic elements work together to create mood, meaning, and message. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 103 - Advertising Fundamentals


    An introductory course on the basic principles and practices of advertising.  The focus will be on the history and effects of advertising on society and culture.  This course also explores how to plan and implement advertising programs through effective research, strategic planning, segmenting target audiences, creative copywriting and design, and understanding media planning and buying.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 106 - Media and Culture I


    This course is an introduction to the function and impact of mediated and mass communication in society. This course explores the history and contemporary landscape of radio, television, and film. Related mass communication theories, new technologies, media effects, and ethical issues are addressed.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 107 - Media and Culture II


    This course is an introduction to the function and impact of mediated and mass communication in society. The course explores the history and contemporary landscape of print media, the Internet, digital media, and consumer culture. Related new technologies, ethical issues, and media effects are addressed. May be taken without completing CMM 106.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 115 - Social Media: Theory and Practice


    This course provides an overview of the role of social media in society. The course uses a research-based focus to examine the internet and digital communication technologies, exploring their intersection with other aspects of communication. Historical, cultural, and theoretical facets of social media are also covered. Students evaluate strategies for effective uses of social media. Additionally, students are expected to utilize social media clients and participate in online communities.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 203 - Public Relations


    Overview of basic principles, concepts, and relationship of theory to practice. Special emphasis on role in society, public opinion, effective strategies and tactics, process, identification of publics, publicity techniques, and effective use of media.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 204 - Promotional Writing


    Application of copywriting for print, broadcast and digital marketing communication. Includes integration of copy and graphics, media advantages and restrictions, amplification, proofing and style, and use of rhetorical devices in the planning and development of advertising campaigns to meet specific client objectives. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 207 - Writing for Media


    An introduction to the styles and formats used for writing for various genres and media with an emphasis on print and digital journalism. The course covers, but is not limited to, writing and reporting for print, blogs, and podcasts; gathering original content; conducting interviews; and writing reviews. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 212 - The Global Ear: Introduction to Recording, Interviewing and Podcasting


    This class explores the rapidly growing rich world of independently produced podcasts broadcast by scientists, storytellers, journalists, and amateur producers across the globe. Students learn techniques for recording clear, crisp audio as well as basic audio editing skills. The class also assists in producing and promoting podcast listening events. Approaches to interviewing (journalistic & ethnographic) are explored. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education and Writing Designated Core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 306 - Social Impact of the Media


    This course examines the role of media in modern culture. Topics include the effects of media on socialization, education, political choice and process, and the formation and development of beliefs, attitudes and behavior.  Students additionally engage in complicated examinations of media texts and their connections to appropriate political, social, and economic issues.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMM 101 or SOC 101 and sophomore class status, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    CMM 315 - Global Mass Communication


    This class introduces students to the history and current state of globalization in the mass media. Issues to be addressed include: differing media systems around the world, the promises and problems of a highly interconnected world in the news, advertising, and entertainment industries, and debates around “Cultural Imperialism” and “Cultural Resistance.” Satisfies Global Issues General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Sophomore class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 335 - Social Media and Marketing


    Students explore the rapidly changing world of social and digital media and how it is applied to the practice of marketing communication. After studying the concepts and theories behind communicating through digital media, students create social media marketing plans to support specific campaign initiatives through the use of these digital media.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 345 - Media and Cultural Studies


    This class provides students with an introduction to media and cultural studies. Content will address the emergence of critical and cultural theories of mass communication as well as theories that address media, culture, and society. Key concepts and theorists in media and cultural studies are related to contemporary media examples.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Sophomore class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 361 - Digital Journalism


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of digital journalism, its history, its structure, its economics, its tools, and its relationship with society and culture.  Key concepts and theories in information society, technology, and journalism are addressed.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 370 - Communication Research Methods


    Students learn the research and analysis tools they need to be successful in the required courses: Senior Thesis I and II. This course covers social scientific quantitative and qualitative research skills and forms used by communication scholars.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 372 - Documentary Modes


    An exploration through screenings, readings, and discussion of the history and various modes of documentary film and television, from the Lumiere Brothers to the present day, including expository, verite-based, interactive and self-reflexive styles. Subgenres considered also include ethnographic approaches, “mockumentary,” and reality TV. By looking closely at a wide range of documentary motion pictures, students gain new tools for media analysis, historical reference, and production methodology. Satisfies the Social Science core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)

  •  

    CMM 380 - Media Ethics


    This course provides an overview of the ethical conflicts faced in contemporary society by media professionals. Through the application of various ethical frameworks, students consider the traditional and contemporary problems of expression and dissemination of information in a converged world.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Sophomore class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 400 - Contemporary Issues in Media Studies


    This course explores in depth an area of media studies. Topics and course descriptions change from semester to semester. Examples of topics may include post-colonial film theory, political communication, or gender studies and media. Students may take more than one section of this course providing the topic is different from one section to the next.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior or senior class status.  Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 405 - Campaign Planning and Client Services


    Advanced study and application of the principles of developing a marketing communication campaign for a client through experiential learning.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMM 103, CMM 204 and junior class status, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 415 - Creative Portfolio Development


    This course requires students to conduct in-depth evaluation of their portfolio of work within the marketing communication major. Students reflect on the importance of aesthetics and using the portfolio to persuade while mastering the professionally vital skills of revision, creating a digital presence, honing presentation skills, and engaging in the rigorous critiquing process so integral to the Marketing Communication field.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMM 103, CMM 204, CMM 405, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    CMM 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CMM 370 and senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CMM 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to digital media, in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 110 - Introduction to Digital Filmmaking


    An introduction to the techniques of single camera digital filmmaking. Topics include camera operation and shot composition and orchestration, pre-production and post-production planning, basic lighting and audio techniques, and training in non-linear editing software. Theory and practice are demonstrated through a diversity of fiction and nonfiction project assignments.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 211 - Fundamentals of Journalism


    Providing students with an introduction to journalism, this course examines what news is, defines news principles, and traces the development of print journalism in the United States. The course offers students a practical introduction to news gathering and writing techniques, including writing under pressure, the principles of good writing, and the ethics of journalism. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 230 - The Contemporary Television Industry


    An overview of the business side of television. The course covers the history and development of television as a mass medium.  Students study economic, programming, and distribution models of the past and present and consider the future of the business in the digital world. 

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 255 - Writing for the Screen


    Students learn dramatic and documentary forms of writing for the screen with the goal of producing materials that can be applied to actual productions in subsequent CMM courses.  Format, character, conflict, story structure, transition, revision, and preparation are explored through exercises, class readings, short screenplays and class critiques. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DM 110 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 260 - Broadcast Journalism


    Introduction to broadcast news.  Emphasis is placed on television news writing, reporting and producing. On-air broadcast journalism techniques - both on-camera and behind the scenes - are explored in depth.  Students gain hands-on experience in various aspects of television news production.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 281 - TV Studio Production I


    Basic and advanced techniques of live studio production through hands-on production experience. Topics include producing and directing in a multi-camera environment, pre-production for a variety of formats, camera operation, graphics, live video switching, and editing roll-ins from tape shot in the field.  Students produce, direct, and crew in group workshop productions.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 300 - Contemporary Issues in Journalism


    Students gain a perspective on challenges facing contemporary journalism and its practitioners. Social and ethical issues in the age of “wired” journalism are highlighted. The role of the journalist and how journalism defines “events of the day” are analyzed from a variety of perspectives.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 338 - Feature Writing


    Examines feature writing through reading texts containing feature stories and current newspapers and magazines. Develops skills in feature writing employing both literary and traditional news gathering techniques to create original stories. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 360 - Podcast and Radio Journalism


    The course is an introduction to the creative and expressive techniques of radio and podcast production. Class topics include planning, recording, editing, uploading, and promoting a journalistic radio program and podcast. The aesthetics of radio and podcast journalism production are demonstrated through the creation of themed audio segments. Theories and issues relating to new technologies, independent journalism, and citizen journalism are covered.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 374 - Advanced Digital Film Making: Documentary and Narrative


    This course is an intensive hands-on experience that explores both documentary and narrative media production from concept development and pre-production, through the process of shooting and editing, to project completion. Students learn theory, aesthetics, and technique as they create and defend their work.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DM 110 and DM 255, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DM 410 - Contemporary Techniques in Digital Filmmaking


    Students taking this course explore, in depth, an area of contemporary media production. Topics and course descriptions change from semester to semester. Examples of topics may include advertising production, digital cinematography, sound design, lighting for digital video, and directing for TV and film. The course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DM 255 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Computer Science

  •  

    CSC 101 - Introduction to Computer Science


    Examines the relationship of computer hardware, operating systems, and applications software. Provides an introduction to principles of web design, networking, and the internet. Considers the impact of information technology on Society. Satisfies Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CSC 160/160L - Introduction to Programming and Lab


    Provides an introduction to computer programming concepts and functions. Introduces problem-solving methods and algorithm development using software programming. Includes procedural and data abstractions, program design, debugging, testing, and documentation. Covers data types, control structures, functions, parameter passing, library functions, and arrays. Weekly programming laboratory exercises. Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    CSC 161 - Data Structures and Algorithms


    This course focuses on expanding the fundamental programming concepts learned in CSC 160. Students learn about elementary abstract data types including classes, linked lists, stacks, queues, heaps, trees, and pointers.  The course also analyzes fundamental computing algorithms, including searching and sorting, as well as recursion. This is a programming intensive class. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 160 and corresponding proficiency in C++.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CSC 260 - Visual Programming I


    An introduction to programming principles using visual programming. Practical issues such as program design, documentation, style, and user-interface design are central to the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 161.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CSC 261 - Visual Programming II and Object-Oriented Design


    An advanced class in visual programming, the course addresses principles and topics central to effective application development, including project management, debugging, testing, coding styles, and the project life cycle in visual programming technology. A focus on object-oriented techniques and architecture in visual programming technology that make it possible for programmers to rapidly develop applications using pre-built objects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 260 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CSC 280 - Computer Architecture


    This course provides an introduction to computer architecture through the study of microprocessor chips. Students develop a basic understanding of computer system architecture (hardware), learn to program embedded computer systems, and learn how I/O devices are controlled by microprocessors. Lectures and hands-on applications are used to develop understanding of systems concepts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 160 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CSC 302 - Web Programming II - Interactive Web Applications


    An advanced examination and application of server-side web programming and client communication technologies that facilitate interactive web applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 102.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CSC 335 - Mobile Application Programming and Design


    In this course, students learn to develop software for smart phones and other mobile devices (Android and iOS.). Analysis of algorithms is presented, as students consider the efficiency of programs for constrained target devices (i.e., processing, memory and storage). This course explores the interface design challenges that accompany small, high-resolution touch screens that lack traditional input mechanisms/techniques to enable location-aware applications..

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 260 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CSC 340 - Database Management


    Survey of the basic concepts and theories in data modeling and database management. The course covers the development of database applications and solutions to satisfy user needs. In addition, students examine the use of the database in contemporary organizations and explore issues surrounding database access, use, and confidentiality.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 160.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CSC 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters)

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    CSC 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    CSC 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CSC 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to computer science in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Criminal Justice

  •  

    CJ 100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    This course provides an overview of the components of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, and corrections. In addition the course provides an understanding of what crime is, why crime occurs, how much crime there is, the juvenile justice system, and crime victims’ rights in the criminal justice system. This course provides the foundation for all subsequent criminal justice and law courses.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 151 - Criminal Law


    A complete review of federal and state criminal statutes with a case analysis approach. Elements of crimes against persons, property, and other societal deviations. Intent, limitations, defenses, and burden of proof are included.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 200 - Criminology


    This course provides an overview of the major criminological theoretical perspectives. It examines the social, political, and intellectual milieu within which each arose. Beginning with 18th and 19th century theories, the course focuses on the sociological, psychological, and political constructions of criminality and their effects on the criminal justice system. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 205 - The American Court System


    An examination of the pre-adjudication and adjudication stages of the criminal process. The roles of the various participants in the criminal trial are also examined. Focus is on the manner in which the trial system works and the rules governing its operation.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 210 - Police Process


    An examination of the social and historical setting of the police. Additionally, the police role in society, police discretion, police career, and police values and culture, organization, and tactics are examined.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 215 - Corrections


    A study of the history and development of the adult correctional system as part of the larger adult criminal justice system. Includes a review and analysis of theories of punishment, a study of institutionalization, alternatives to incarceration, and the roles of convicted offenders and the criminal justice personnel who work with them.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 230 - Technology Applications in Criminal Justice


    This course provides an overview of the use of information technology systems within the criminal justice community and examines the evolution of information technology in criminal justice, applied uses of today’s technology in criminal justice, and the integration of technology into police operations, court and prosecution services, and correctional administration. Students explore technologies and systems that criminal justice practitioners use and depend on every day including, but not limited to, database systems, analytical software, information sharing and communications interoperability, mapping and geo-spatial software; biometrics, and networking and information security services.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 241 - Victimology


    Examination of current theory and research regarding victims of crime. Devotes attention to concepts such as victim vulnerability and victim culpability. In addition, the course discusses the implications of a victim-oriented perspective for the administration of justice and assesses current victim programs, including restitution, mediation, and compensation. (Formerly CJ 356)

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 300 - The Juvenile Justice System


    An examination of the underlying theory and operation of the juvenile justice system. Analysis of the procedures used to process an alleged juvenile delinquent through the justice system and the impact of juvenile delinquency on the general society is conducted. The course also focuses on the similarities and differences between the juvenile and the adult criminal justice system.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 301 - Criminal Procedure


    This course focuses on an historical evaluation of the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 14th Amendments and the use of making rights prescribed under the Bill of Rights applicable to the individual states. Inherent problems are detailed as the Constitution applies to police practices, illegal search and seizure, and right to counsel. Precedents are studied for the conclusions reached.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 302 - Research Methods


    Methods and techniques of research in criminal justice and related fields are the focus of this course.  Emphasis is given to the development of empirical questions from theory, research design and control, construction of survey instruments, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results.  Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100, HMS 100 or CJ 100, and junior class status.  (Formerly CJ 240)

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 320 - Community Corrections


    The historical and conceptual development of community corrections in the United States, including in-depth analysis of probation, parole, and other non-institutional forms of correctional intervention are analyzed. Particular attention is given to the structure and function of various community correctional components such as probation, parole, diversion, halfway houses, restitution, and restorative justice programs.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 341 - Domestic Violence


    This course covers the history of domestic violence as a social problem, its dynamics, prevalence, outcomes, research issues, and contemporary domestic violence policy. The course focuses on domestic violence in the United States. The goal of this course is to provide students with a broad understanding of domestic violence, its effects on today’s society, and the resources available to address it. The course also cultivates the knowledge and skills that will allow students to critically evaluate representations of domestic violence in a variety of contexts.
     

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 355 - Race and Justice


    Examines issues of race, racism, and ethnicity within the criminal justice system and the justice process with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field. Satisfies Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters)

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    CJ 400 - Current Issues in Criminal Justice


    This course examines current issues in the criminal justice field and investigates selected subjects with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field. The specific theories, subject matter, and techniques to be investigated are dependent upon the topic being considered. Possible topics may include: white collar crime, terrorism, computer crime, computers and criminal justice, law and society, civil liabilities of criminal justice personnel, or community corrections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 410 - Law and Society


    Students are exposed to the dominant theoretical methods used to explain the interplay between law and society in everyday life. Additionally, ways in which social values are incorporated within legislative and judicial decisions are studied. Students have the opportunity to critically analyze differing views on legal and social issues facing our society.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    CJ 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CJ 302 or PSY 240, PSY 241, senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    CJ 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to criminal justice in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SST 301 - Terrorism Studies


    This course investigates the context, causes, correlates, and consequences of the crime of terrorism from a broad range of academic perspectives. The individual, group, and organizational factors that motivate international and domestic terrorist groups to action are covered, in addition to common strategies designed to reduce the threat of terrorism and mitigate its effects on society. An interdisciplinary course, CJ350 references the distinct fields of history, political science, international studies, sociology, criminology, criminal justice, human services, and victimology.
     

    (Cr: 3)
  • Dance

    Drama

  •  

    DRA 100 - Introduction to Theater


    This course surveys all aspects of the art of theater from the Greeks to contemporary Theater. The class introduces students to significant plays, playwrights, theater genres, and the evolution of production practices up to and including contemporary for-profit and not-for-profit professional theater. The course exposes students to theater through lectures, performances, viewing, and reading. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DRA 105 - Theater Performance


    In this course students are involved with the semester’s theater production in any of the following ways: acting, directing, producing, stage managing, set designing, lighting, sound, construction, technical work, pit orchestra, costumes, props. Students learn aspects of all of these skills. May be repeated up to eight semesters for credit. Only three credits of this course can be applied toward the General Education elective requirement. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education elective requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    DRA 106 - Private Theater Instruction


    Weekly instruction in acting is provided by special arrangement, and at an additional fee. One private lesson per week. Hours arranged with instructor. May be repeated up to eight semesters for credit. Only three credits of this course can be applied toward the General Education elective requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    DRA 200 - Acting Techniques I


    In this course, which is grounded in the Stanislavski acting method, students train through response, concentration, and imagination exercises. These techniques are applied in groups, individually, and in basic scene work. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DRA 205 - Acting Techniques II


    Improvisational techniques, characterization, and interpretation employed in Acting Techniques I are applied to musical theater scenes. Scenes from classic and modern musicals are rehearsed and studied in terms of styles and historical perspective. The course also includes the effective use of the singing voice on stage, and movement for actors.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DRA 220 - Introduction to Theater Production


    In this course, students begin the production process by analyzing dramatic texts. They produce creative design in the areas of lighting, props, sound, set, and costumes. The course also covers theory and knowledge of these design elements, and stage management. Finally, students participate in productions directed by professionals to complement class meetings. Students are required to participate in evening and weekend preparations and rehearsals. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education elective.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DRA 310 - Directing


    This course is designed for students who have already received an introduction to theater arts and performance. Students explore the function of a director from its establishment as an artistic voice in theater production to practical application of directorial concepts. Students begin with preparing a theoretical approach to staging a play to directing a cutting from a published play.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Early Childhood and Elementary Teacher Licensure

  •  

    ED 010 - Communication/Literacy Lab


    A test preparation program for the Communication and Literacy Skills test of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL), this lab focuses on and provides hands-on practice with the critical reading, writing, and test-taking skills necessary to pass this portion of the MTEL. Required of all students in teacher licensure programs. Students who pass the Communication and Literacy Skills Test will be waived from this lab.

    (Cr: 0)
  •  

    ED 020 - Foundations of Reading Lab


    A test preparation program for the Foundations of Reading test of the MTEL, this lab focuses on the reading instruction content and test-taking strategies necessary to pass this portion of the MTEL. Required of all elementary and early childhood program students.

    (Cr: 0)
  •  

    ED 030 - Subject Matter Lab


    This test preparation program provides Specific content and test-taking strategies for three of the MTEL subject matter tests required in Endicott Teacher Licensure programs: biology, early childhood, English, general curriculum (elementary), environmental science, history, mathematics, physical education, and vsual arts. Required of all students in teacher licensure programs.

    (Cr: 0)
  •  

    ED 101 - Introduction to Education


    This course is designed to introduce students to the education profession.  It focuses on teachers, students, schools, curriculum, pedagogy, and the past, present, and future of education.  Students gain knowledge on current educational issues as they relate to the history, philosophy, financing and governance of schools and school systems.

     

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    ED 102 - Curriculum Theory and Instruction


    A study of curriculum dimensions, concepts, and designs for varied student populations and school settings.  Through examination of the Massachusetts Department of Education’s Common Core of Learning and Curriculum Frameworks documents, students come to understand how the state standards can be used as guidelines in structuring curriculum, curriculum development, and how the issues, trends, and innovations of curriculum design can be applied in an effective integrated classroom using Understanding by Design and an Endicott Lesson Plan.
     

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 201/201L - Foundations of Reading and Field Experience


    This course gives an in-depth understanding of the reading process and of the teaching of reading. Theoretical and research information on reading and emergent literacy is included.  Topics also covered in the course include: phonics, word recognition, vocabulary development, comprehension, fluency, and study skills. Students learn the major approaches and materials for teaching skills in phonemic awareness, decoding, encoding, reading for meaning, comprehension strategies, content reading, and study skills as recommended in the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks/ English Language Arts, the Standards of the International Reading Association and National Standards for Literacy. To develop a deeper understanding of the coursework, students will participate in a field experience for 8 weeks during the semester. Must be registered for the course and field experience sections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 101 and ED 102 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 203 - Introduction to Children with Special Needs


    This course introduces the historical, legal, and social aspect of special needs education in the United States. Responsiveness to Intervention is presented as a framework for early identification methods in general education. Theory and practice promoting inclusion provides a philosophical foundation for the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes

    ED 101 or ED 125 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    ED 207 - Strategies of Teaching Early Childhood Curriculum


    In this course, students explore theoretical principles underlying developmentally appropriate practice in inclusive early childhood settings. Focusing on the developmental needs of young children, students examine varied teaching strategies, materials, and models of instruction. A strong focus of this course is providing students with a framework for planning engaging and responsive learning environments and experiences to foster the growth of the whole child.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 101 and ED 102 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 208 - Early Childhood Numeracy


    Expanding on concepts explored in ED 207, this course develops students’ knowledge in planning learning experiences that foster the development of mathematical thinking in young children.  Pre-service teachers explore instructional strategies and materials designed to foster conceptual mathematical development in three to five-year-olds.  Following recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the National Association for the Education of Young Children, this course examines how to incorporate mathematical experiences throughout the day.  Students explore strategies to integrate mathematical instruction with other content areas as well as how to create environments that extends mathematical thinking.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 101, ED 102, and ED 207, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 210 - Integrating Technology into the Classroom


    Students in this course explore and examine how to use technology to support teaching and learning by integrating a variety of computer-based technologies into the curriculum while also adapting these technologies for diverse populations. Students design lessons incorporating technology and also strategize how to integrate the Internet, digital resources, educational apps, and Web 2.0 resources into daily classroom activities.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 101 and ED 102 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 215 - Creative Arts in the Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms


    Children constantly wonder and question as they try to make sense of their worlds. In this course, students explore teaching and learning strategies to ignite this sense of wonder and curiosity in both children and in themselves. Through engagement with the arts, students explore components of arts integration practices. Students will examine creative and critical thinking strategies to foster the development of habits of mind.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 221 - Emergent Literacy Instruction


    Students examine oral language development and emerging communication abilities in young children focusing on early speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The characteristics of a literacy rich environment is explored, including developmentally appropriate materials and instructional strategies designed to foster the development of oral and written language skills in young children.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 201 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 229 - Literacy Methods


    Students are encouraged to investigate the language arts strands of reading, writing, speaking, and listening as balanced literacy in the early childhood and elementary classroom. Students explore common and specialized literacy programs and practice techniques in planning for children’s skills development in all the language arts.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 201 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 230 - The Early Childhood Pedagogy of Reggio Emilia, Italy


    Examining the philosophy of the municipal schools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, students explore the “culture of childhood” and the images and potentials of the child within that culture.  This course focuses on translating the pedagogy of Reggio Emilia into American culture and implementing Reggio-inspired practices into early childhood and elementary programs.  Students learn how to facilitate learning experiences that encourage young children to explore, to wonder, to investigate, and to construct knowledge.  

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 290 - Topics In Education


    Focuses on a range of issues significant to the field of education, including school reform, service learning in schools, school diversity, pedagogy, and classroom assessment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 301 - Math Methods and Field Experience


    Examines the purpose and content of the K-6 mathematics curriculum, highlighting a wide variety of teaching procedures and instructional materials. Evaluation techniques for use in the classroom and pedagogical methodology are addressed. Current research, issues, and frameworks are examined. A semester-long field component is included in this course. (3 cr. Lecture, 1 cr. Field experience). Must be registered for methods course and ED303.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status and a passing score on at least two MTEL exams. Open to liberal studies/education teacher licensure majors only.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 302 - Science Methods


    This course supports the pre-service teacher in planning for the teaching of science in the K-6 classroom. Major concepts, curriculum theory, and instructional strategies appropriate to science education are explored. Major principles of science, development of science lesson plans, experiments, demonstrations, enrichment activities, and science projects using a hands-on approach are included. Current research, issues, and frameworks in science are examined. Focus is on assessment, cooperative learning, and hands-on science. A semester-long field component is included in this course. (3 cr. Lecture, 1 cr. Field experience). Must be registered for methods course and ED303.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status and a passing score on at least two MTEL exams. Open to liberal studies/education teacher licensure majors only.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 306 - Social Studies Methods


    An inquiry approach is incorporated for developing concept knowledge and skills in social studies for students in Pre-K through grade 6. Curriculum content, materials, planning, implementing, and assessing learning are included across all of the social sciences. Instruction in history, geography, economics, political science, and other social sciences are considered in light of current recommendations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and national standards such as those of the National Council for Social Studies (NCSS). Students explore integrating social studies content across all learning experiences to develop thinking skills and awareness of self and community. A semester-long field component is included in this course. (3 cr. Lecture, 1 cr. Field experience). Must be registered for methods course and ED303.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status and a passing score on at least two MTEL exams. Open to liberal studies/education teacher licensure majors only.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 308 - Early Childhood Methods


    Expanding on concepts explored in ED 207, this course develops students’ knowledge in planning interdisciplinary learning experiences that support the needs of the whole child. Pre-service teachers explore early childhood instructional strategies and materials designed to develop positive dispositions for learning, to foster an appreciation of individual and cultural differences, and to meet state and federal standards. Examination of the crucial link between observation and effective teaching is addressed. A field component is included in this course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 240 / 240L.  Open to teacher licensure majors only.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 310 - The Power of Play in the Classroom


    This course explores the cognitive, social, emotional, physical, and creative benefits of play in the early childhood and elementary classroom. Through interactive learning experiences, readings, and discussions, students examine the nature of play, its disappearance in our schools, and its importance in the development of the whole child.  Students develop a rationale for play as a fundamental component of the curriculum, design developmentally appropriate learning environments, and create play-based learning experiences. Students explore the teacher’s role in observing, facilitating, and assessing play. Inclusive play-based intervention strategies for children with developmental delays are addressed.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 321 - Junior Transitions


    A semester-long focus on the transition to the senior year through preparation for student teaching or semester internship in the field of education. Students develop a resume, search and/or apply for sites, and focus on professional preparation for the semester-long experience. Pass/Fail grading.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    ED 339 - Classroom Assessment


    Students examine theories and strategies for effective design and assessment of instruction. This course explores a wide variety of assessment methods and strategies including, but not limited to, traditional pencil-and- paper assessments, performance assessments, portfolio-based assessments, and competency-based assessments. Through their field experiences, students also become familiar with how assessment is used in public schools in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, including how data is being used as a tool to improve student learning.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 102 or ED 125 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 340 - Global Consciousness through Children’s Literature


    Students develop skills in teaching using a literature based approach to teaching in the content areas. Students read 50-75 pieces of historical and/or multicultural children’s literature and develop highly motivating units based on the Wiggins and McTigue model of understanding by design. This course incorporates the standards of both the English and Social Studies Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks in the interactive units.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 401 - Practicum and Seminar in Early Childhood Education


    A 14-week, full-time student teaching experience that allows for application of acquired concepts and methodologies in the classroom. Students complete a minimum of 300 practicum hours, including 100 hours in a PreK-K classroom and 200 hours in a grade 1-2 classroom. At least one setting must include children with disabilities. Students are jointly supervised by a cooperating practitioner and a college supervisor. A weekly college seminar is also required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Passing scores on all required MTEL exams and completion of all prior coursework per program policies.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    ED 403 - Internship and Seminar in Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8)


    Students complete a minimum of 150 internship hours in the role of the moderate special needs teacher in a prek-8 classroom.  Students are jointly supervised by a cooperating practitioner and a college supervisor.  A weekly college seminar is also required.  Completion of this course, in addition to ED 203 and ED 325, allows the student to apply to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education for an initial license in moderate disabilities (preK-8) upon graduation from Endicott, receipt of their initial license in elementary or early childhood education, and passing score on the General Curriculum MTEL.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 400 or ED401.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LSE 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver a final project that clearly articulates their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    LSE 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LSE 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to education in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Economics

  •  

    ECN 201 - Macroeconomics


    The measurement of the United States economy and the factors that contribute to economic growth and recession are the focus of macroeconomics. The role of government in the economy is closely examined. Particular attention is paid to tax and spending policy as well as the policy of the Federal Reserve. Government policy has a significant impact on the performance of the private economy. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ECN 202 - Microeconomics


    Examines the basic concepts of microeconomics, including theories and models that describe how consumers and producers of goods and services make rational economic choices, and the implications of those choices for market prices, quality, and product variety. Looks at demand and supply elasticity, the nature of competitive rivalry, factors of production, income distribution, and the impact of government regulation. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ECN 304 - Economics of the European Union (Offered in Spain)


    An overview of the events that took place from 2002, the year that the Euro was introduced as the  official European currency until 2004, when another ten European nations became member states of the Union. Students analyse how this new currency is affecting the economic realities of Europe as well as the rest of the world.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECN 201 and ECN 202.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Educational Studies

  •  

    ED 125 - Approaches to Secondary Education


    This course provides students with an overview of middle and secondary school education, including social and government forces that influence today’s schools, the legal and ethical issues educators must consider, the impact of diverse student learners on teaching and learning, and other key topics in the field. The course also introduces students to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s Common Core of Learning and Curriculum Frameworks, with an emphasis on curriculum development, design, and implementation at the middle and secondary levels.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ED 240/240L - Literacy in the Content Areas and Field Experience


    This course is designed for pre-service teachers seeking licensure in middle or secondary schools.  The course explores the reading process, writing process, and study skills strategies that students in the secondary school will need for accessing both print and non-print sources in the content areas.  Emphasis is placed not only on skills development in the language arts but also on the transfer of those skills in the context of multiple academic disciplines. Students develop skills in planning for integrating literacy into all classrooms while accommodating all learners. To develop a deeper understanding of the coursework students participate in an 8-week placement of 4 hours per week. Must be registered for the course and field experience sections.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisite: ED 125. Open to secondary education licensure majors only.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Endicott College Teaching Fellows Program

    Engineering

  •  

    EGR 100 - Introduction to Engineering


    First course introduces students to the fundamental principles of engineering design. This introductory course teaches students how teamwork, communication, and design techniques can be applied to a variety of engineering problems. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

     

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 201 - Statics


    This introductory course in mechanics covers bodies in equilibrium. Topics include vector forces, free-body diagrams, moments, couples, shear, friction, moments of inertia, and equations of equilibrium.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 136. Co-requisite: PHY 201.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 202 - Dynamics


    This introductory course in mechanics covers bodies in motion. Topics include particle kinematics, planar kinematics of rigid bodies, and three-dimensional kinematics of rigid bodies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EGR 201 and a grade of “C” or better in MTH 136.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 210 - Introduction to Materials Science


    This course introduces the fundamental principles of materials science. Students explore the chemical and physical properties of materials including metals, polymers, ceramics and other materials as well as the behavior, properties, standards, ethical/ecological considerations and processing of materials related to engineering applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHE 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 215 - Probability and Statistics for Engineers


    This course introduces students to probability and statistics for engineers. Topics include data types, probability distributions, statistical analyses of one, two, and multiple variables, regression and correlation, goodness of fit tests, and Bayesian methods. Examples and applications are focused on problems relevant to engineering majors. The course is taught using the R statistics package.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 134.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 300 - Engineering Computer Applications


    Students apply key engineering software to engineering design problems. Solidworks 3-D modeling and simulation of parts are used to explore design challenges and standards for engineering documentation. Students are introduced to MATLAB coding in problem sets and modeling exercises.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 160 and EGR 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 305 - Introduction to Circuits and Electronics


    An introduction to fundamental topics in electrical engineering that covers the foundations of electronic devices, circuit design, semiconductor devices, digital logic and advanced engineering mathematical analysis. Topics and examples focus on a broad range of engineering applications and include appropriate software applications (PartSim/FreeSpice).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 136 and PHY 202.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 310 - Strength of Materials


    This course introduces the mechanics of materials. The mechanics of deformable bodies are covered with topics including stress, strain, shear, axial load, torsion, bending, transformation, and buckling. Laboratory exercises, data analysis, and modeling simulations accompany the lecture to provide students with hands-on experience.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EGR 201 and EGR 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 315 - Introduction to Systems Engineering


    This course focuses on designing and analyzing successful systems using an interdisciplinary approach. The class focus is on defining required functionality and customer needs, documenting requirements, system modeling, validation and design. The course also emphasizes systems engineering design and analysis within the context of global economic, ethical and environmental considerations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EGR 215. Co-requisite: EGR 320.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 320 - Instrumentation and Data Acquisition


    This first course in instrumentation and data acquisition covers the foundations of sensors, data acquisition, measurements, statistical and uncertainty analysis, and integrated circuit design. Common techniques and software applications, such as PartSim/FreeSpice and LabVIEW, are explored in both theoretical and practical applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EGR 305.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 330 - Thermodynamics


    This course is focused on applications in engineering and covers the principles of thermodynamics and engineered systems such as heat exchangers, engines, chillers, and cooling towers. The class provides an overview of reaction equilibria for systems with chemical reactions, e.g. fuel cells.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHE 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 340 - Fluid Mechanics


    This course is a survey of fluid mechanics relating to liquid and gaseous fluid flow in engineered and natural systems. Topics covered include fluid statics, the momentum equation, flow in conduits and open channels. Mathematical modeling of fluid dynamics is introduced to students during the course of the semester.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EGR 330 and MTH 330.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 360 - Environmental Engineering


    This course applies engineering principles to derive solutions to environmental problems or concerns. Topics include environmental risk assessment, water supply and treatment resources, wastewater treatment, solid and hazardous waste management, and air pollution control. Relevant scientific knowledge is reinforced (e.g. chemistry, physics, biology).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CHE 105 and PHY 201, CHE 306 recommended.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 370 - Engineering Robotics


    This course provides an overview of modern robotic navigation, path planning, sensor fusion, and decision-making. It is an introduction to building robotics and using sensor feedback to accomplish various robotic applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EGR 305, MTH 330, and junior class status. Co-requisite: EGR 450 recommended.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    EGR 410 - Mechanical Systems


    This is an advanced course in mechanical systems. Building upon prior knowledge of materials, dynamics, and computer applications, students learn about failure prevention and the elements that comprise mechanical systems. Finite element analysis is introduced. Students apply their understanding to design, test, and model individual components and inter-connected systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EGR 300 and EGR 310.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 430 - Transport Phenomena


    This course explores how mass transfer, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics are key to the design of devices for engineering applications. Modeling in MATLAB is used to demonstrate how changes in design affect natural and engineered systems. Similarities in modeling all types of flux are emphasized. Systems with simultaneous heat and mass transfer are considered.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 330, and BEN 340 or EGR 340.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 450 - Mathematical Modeling for Engineers


    This advanced course in mathematical modeling and numerical approximation techniques covers topics such as linear algebra and matrices, interpolation, curve-fitting, numerical differentiation and quadrature problems, iterative techniques, and numerical solutions to classical engineering problems using ordinary and partial differential equations. Previously developed programming skills (MATLAB) are developed to run simulations and numerical solutions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EGR 300 and MTH 330.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 460 - Energy Systems Design


    This course covers the principles and design of energy conversion systems, focusing primarily on power plants. Traditional and alternative energy source inputs are discussed and contrasted based on power outputs, environmental aspects, geographical constraints, and design considerations. The course culminates in a design project.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EGR 330.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 470 - Feedback and Control


    This course provides an understanding of how control systems are implemented and analyzed in real-world designs. Applications of study include robotics, electronics, feedback loops, and various dynamic systems.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    EGR 305, MTH 330, and junior class status. Co-requisite: EGR 450 recommended.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment. The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors. A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed or the school dean must grant permission. Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    EGR 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II. Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects. The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EGR 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior
Thesis I, students will investigate a topic related
to engineering in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I.  Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • English

  •  

    ENG 100 - Introduction to Composition (Offered in Spain)


    Prepares students for ENG 111 by introducing them to the fundamentals of academic writing. This course does not meet the core curriculum requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 102 - Introduction to Literary Studies


    This course offers an introduction to the fundamentals of literary study. The course focuses on interpretation and criticism of fiction, poetry, and drama. Critical methodologies for literary analysis, literary terminology, and appropriate research methods are also examined. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 103 - Speech


    Development of effective speaking and speechwriting skills. To accomplish this, students write and deliver speeches with the guidance and encouragement of the instructor and peers. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 106 - English Communication (Offered in Spain)


    This course is intended for students whose skills are between upper intermediate and advanced level. It reflects the fast changing world of business, with materials from authentic sources. Students study business topics and acquire proficiency in written and oral communication. Students learn about the causes of communication breakdowns and how to avoid them through effective listening and note taking. They analyze case studies, role play authentic business situations and begin to understand the effects different styles of management have on business outcomes.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 108 - Introduction to Creative Writing


    Students are introduced to the art of creative writing through reading the creative works of a variety of authors. The course also covers essential aspects of writing fiction, poetry, drama, essays, and memoirs. Students explore the creative writing process which is the discovery of ideas for writing, and find inspiration in the things they read and in everyday life. The course also examines genres suited to the themes and images that ideas engender. Open to all students, but required of English majors concentrating in creative writing and creative writing minors. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 110 - Introduction to Professional Writing


    Introduces students to the theories, practices, and genres encountered in workplace, organizational, and professional writing situations. Students learn the theoretical underpinnings of vocational writing and apply those theories to various professional scenarios, producing high quality compositions for real world situations and complex work environments. Students also investigate the possibilities of current technologies in the workplace, document design, and collaborative work. Satisfies the Writing Designated Core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 202 - The Novel


    An examination of the novel, including its origins in the eighteenth century, the development of the form, and the themes and concerns that have given life to the genre from the 18th century to the present. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 203 - Early American Literature


    Surveys American literature from the pre-contact period to the Civil War, focusing on how significant literary and diverse cultural texts from this period reflect the struggles of a growing nation. Students read and analyze indigenous creation stories, exploration accounts, autobiographies, sermons, diaries, letters, public documents, and other narratives, frequently paired in order to discover alternate viewpoints. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 204 - American Literature: Civil War to Present


    Covers important literary trends from the end of the Civil War to the turn of the 20th century, the modern period from 1910 to 1945, and the contemporary period from 1945 to the present. The course emphasizes the ongoing American preoccupation with multiculturalism by considering the ways in which American culture both reflects and is shaped by its literature. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 207 - Creative Non-Fiction I


    Offers students an introduction to the art of creative nonfiction. Students are encouraged to find their own voice as they learn how to craft essays, reflections, and cultural commentary. Class time will be devoted to writing exercises and discussing professional and student writing. Students are also encouraged to give a public reading of their work. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

     

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    ENG 208 - Writing Poetry I


    A course designed to give students practice in writing poetry. Its aim is to develop students’ skill and confidence in writing by studying selected examples of good writing. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 209 - Writing Short Fiction I


    Writing of short stories and one-act plays through which students come to recognize the elements that combine to create clear, dramatic, specific and truthful works. Writers read their own works and the works of others to help find their own voice, theme, and style. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 210 - Topics in Literature


    Each section of this course explores in depth a different literary theme or topic, such as the detective story, bestsellers, or literature on film. Course may be taken more than once as long as the course content is new. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 212 - Drama Survey


    Survey of the development of drama from the ancient Greeks to the contemporary theater. Students read works of major playwrights and study theater in terms of culture, theme, style, theory, and production. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 213 - Early British Literature


    Surveys the English tradition in literature, beginning with the early Middle Ages and ending with the Restoration. Important themes will include: faith, chivalry, love, marriage, adultery, and heroism. Readings will include selections from Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe and poetry selections from Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Marvell, Wroth, Raleigh, Queen Elizabeth, and Milton. While we will be situating these works in their historical and cultural contexts, emphasis will be on the close reading of these texts. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 214 - British Literature: 18th Century to Present


    Course examines the influence of the Enlightenment, Romanticism, the Industrial Revolution and the fall of the aristocracy, post-World War I Modernism, post-World War II Existentialism and Absurdism, late 20th century Post-Modernism, and 21st century social anxiety on British textual production. Students analyze a variety of genres including, but not limited to fiction, poetry, drama, and film. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 216 - Beat Generation


    Focuses on Ginsberg, Ferlinghetti, and Kerouac, their social and artistic revolt, their debt to Whitman and other earlier writers, and their legacy in popular culture from the 1960s to the present. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 217 - History and Structure of the English Language


    This course introduces students to the basic principles of descriptive linguistics by examining the English language in its contemporary and historical forms. Students learn to articulate and apply the basic principles of phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. In units on dialect and sociolinguistics, they explore the social dimension of language and apply their linguistic expertise to a range of artistic productions, including oral histories and rap lyrics. Students consider both the history and the future of English, including the impact of new technology on language change. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

     

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    ENG 218 - Argument Based Writing


    This course builds upon the critical reading and writing skills honed in ENG111 and ENG112, helping students to further develop their ability to assess and compose academic/argument-based essays. Students critically read and respond to challenging academic texts, and compose thoughtful and well-supported argument-based essays and research papers. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 220 - American Short Story Cycles


    Introduction to the genre of the short story cycle. Through class discussions and essay writing, students discover the various ways writers have found to create short story cycles or unified short story collections: recurring themes, characters, settings, and plot patterns are some of the unifying elements that are examined. Representative writers may include Sherwood Anderson, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Flannery O’Connor, Louise Erdrich, and Richard Wright. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 221 - Banned Books


    Censorship is nothing new; books have been banned, burned, and bowdlerized for generations. In this course, students study some of those books and work toward an understanding of what lies beneath the impulse to censor. Are some ideas simply so unpleasant that they need to be kept from the citizenry? Students read texts that have been banned for political or religious reasons, texts that have faced obscenity charges, and texts that have been challenged as inappropriate for schools and public libraries. The overarching concern is to contemplate what place censorship has in a free society.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 223 - The Bible as Literature


    Introduces students to the Bible as a literary and historically grounded text. Emphasis is on the literary, ethical, political, philosophical, and theological uses of scripture by Jews and Christians. Topics include God and the problem of evil, slavery and freedom, prophecy and justice, history and historical context, gender and race, and law and ethics. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 225 - Literary Criticism and Interpretation


    Literary studies are founded on the principles of sound interpretation and analysis. This course provides students with knowledge of the key approaches to literary texts, including new criticism, reader-response theory, Marxism, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Feminism, New Historicism, and Queer Theory. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENG 102 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 226 - Early American History and Literature


    An interdisciplinary examination of the American past up to and including the Civil War. Course covers American Indian history and culture prior to and after the arrival of European settlers; the founding of the republic; and the ideals, contradictions, and emerging identity of a growing nation. Students study key events, institutions, reform campaigns, and literary movements, and the broader cultural and ideological contexts in which they arose. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 227 - African-American Literature


    Explores the writings of African-American authors in the genres of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, autobiography, and drama from the 18th century to the present. Students study the cultural and spiritual forces that shaped African-American literature; the literature’s connection to slavery and its abolition, Reconstruction, segregation, and the Civil Rights movement; and its impact on American culture. Texts include slave narratives, poetry and fiction from the Harlem Renaissance, and works representing black realism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 230 - Rebels and Misfits


    This course closely analyzes the motives of characters who defy authority or their times in selected stories, novellas, poems, and films. Examination of characters who choose to drop out or are ostracized are also conducted, deciding who deserves our sympathy and why. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 235 - Twentieth Century Fiction


    A brief introduction to the art of fiction followed by close readings of modern master works. American short stories and novels are compared to masterpieces from other cultures in order to view fiction as an international phenomenon and, even within nations (such as the United States), as multicultural in nature. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 240 - Boston in Literature and Film


    Examines portrayals of Boston in fiction, memoirs, poetry, and film. Students study how authors and filmmakers imagine, remember, and document the city, and use their work to comment on Boston’s history and culture, its social geography, its promise and shortcomings. Texts include classic and contemporary works, including examples of Boston noir fiction and film. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 245 - Cartoonists and Satirists


    The course explores motives and methods of cartoonists, writers, and filmmakers who strike an attitude and mock or comically send up social trends or government actions.  While the course examines the uses of satire in some early works, special attention is given to Boondocks, The Daily Show, and other contemporary examples. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

     

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 260 - Gothic Literature


    The course introduces students to the concepts, critical theories, and principal texts of the Gothic movement from the late 18th Century to the late 20th Century. Students read a variety of novels and short stories that exemplify the Gothic genre, and study a selection of critical documents that explain and account for the enduring popularity of this compelling literary movement. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 305 - Writing for Inquiry


    An advanced writing course that helps students develop critical thinking and writing skills as well as the spirit of questioning and inquiry. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 307 - Creative Non-Fiction II


    This course offers students the opportunity to develop the art of creative nonfiction. Students are encouraged to find their own voice as they craft essays, reflections, memoirs, and short autobiographies or biographies. Class time is devoted to writing exercises and discussing professional and student writing. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENG 207.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 308 - Writing Poetry II


    Students write poetry and strive to create work that has a vivid and original use of imagery, metaphor, language, use of sound, themes, and a clear voice. Students read selected works by other authors and produce a chapbook of their own poetry. The course provides students opportunities to write, read, and receive critical analysis of their work. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENG 208.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 309 - Writing Short Fiction II


    This course offers students the opportunity to develop the art of writing fiction. Students are encouraged to find their own voice as they craft and develop their own stories.  Class time is devoted to writing exercises and discussing professional and student writing. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENG 209.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 310 - Modern American Poetry


    Exploration of the tradition of modern American poetry. From Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson to Robert Lowell and Sylvia Plath, the course traces the shaping of the American poetic identity over the past two centuries. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 312 - Literature for Children


    Examines the genre of children’s literature from a variety of historical, social, and cultural perspectives. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 313 - World Literature


    An exploration of major works of World Literature from the 17th century through the present. The course examines representative literature through the lens of genre, theme, major figures, minority voices, major events, literary periods, or national origins. Possible topics include Eastern, Western, African, Asian, Australian, Latin American, and Russian Literature. Students may take more than one section of this course as long as the topic is different from one section to the next. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 315 - Women Writers


    Study of literature by and about women including the diverse images and roles of women as they are recorded by representative writers in America and England. Reading selections reflect the diversity of ethnic and racial traditions in the United States and the variety of social, political, and economic backgrounds of women’s experience. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 336 - Nature Writing


    Examines the tradition of the literary form of nature writing by reading classic and contemporary texts. Writing about the natural world is done from a variety of perspectives and genres, including nonfiction, fiction, poems, and field journals. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 337 - American Indian Literature


    American Indian experience recorded in fiction, autobiography, poetry, and essay in the 20th century and beyond emphasizes specific tribal traditions, values, and practices. The impact of United States government policies on native people, families, and tribes is recorded in the literature. Historical, geographical, political, and economic contexts are considered in this study of works produced by American Indians. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 361 - Victorian Secrets: Fear and Hypocrisy in Victorian Literature


    This British literature course focuses on the texts of the Victorian 19th century. The course examines fiction, poetry, and drama that represent Britain’s anxious negotiation of 19th century identity from self-assured beacon of industrial progress and proud seat of world empire, to symbol of urban exploitation and disappearing rural tradition. The course also examines the development of Victorian aesthetic forms, from the role of the Victorian third person narrator, to the rise of didactic poetic rhythms, to the structure of dialogue in late Victorian dramatic satire. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

     

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    ENG 365 - Shakespeare


    Recognizing that students may have only previously encountered Shakespeare as the “grand master of English letters” or as the “beloved genius of English theater,” this course focuses on alternative readings of Shakespeare’s plays. Students read the primary texts and examine Shakespeare via contemporary literary and social theories, as well as through recent cinematic treatments of Shakespearean plays and themes. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 367 - Eastern Literature and Haiku


    Haiku poetry is the grasp of the essential nature of things. It is what is happening in a place at a moment. The poet describes one moment and one feeling in haiku. By studying how the form of haiku developed through the culture and literature of India, China, and Japan, students explore how this literature is grounded in Taoism, Buddhism, and Zen Buddhism. The course will trace the origins of haiku for a richer understanding of the form. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters)

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    ENG 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    ENG 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENG 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to English in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • English as a Second Language

  •  

    ESL 023 - Business English I (Offered in Spain)


    This course introduces students to business English at an intermediate level. It aims to provide the business vocabulary students require to participate effectively in business courses and in the world of work. It combines the most recent ideas from the world of business with a strong task-based approach. Students develop their communication skills in presentations, meetings, negotiations, telephoning, and social English. Credits for this course do not count towards a degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ESL 024 - Business English II (Offered in Spain)


    This course takes students from intermediate level to upper intermediate level. It is intended for students who are interested in increasing their knowledge of business practice and concepts. Authentic material and an intensive task-based approach helps students to feel more confident in areas of communication. Students discuss case studies and report their recommendations, emulating authentic business situations. Credits for this course do not count towards a degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ESL 025 - Business English III (Offered in Spain)


    This course introduces students to upper intermediate business English. It builds on the skills introduced in Business English II and prepares the students for English Communication. Students continue to study business topics and acquire business vocabulary. They write business letters, reports, press releases, agendas, minutes, and summarize articles from business magazines and newspapers. Credits for this course do not count towards a degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ESL 088 - English as a Second Language I (Offered in Spain)


    This course is an intermediate level general English course taken simultaneously with Elements of Writing I. Task-based language activities are introduced in short readings and film segments that simulate real situations the students are likely to encounter. Grammar is taught using oral, written, and interactive exercises. Credits for this course do not count towards a degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ESL 089 - English as a Second Language II (Offered in Spain)


    This general English course takes the students from intermediate to upper intermediate level. It aims to continue to build upon the skills acquired in English as a Second Language I. Task-based language activities are introduced in short readings and film segments that simulate real situations the students are likely to encounter. Grammar is taught using oral, written, and interactive exercises. Credits for this course do not count towards a degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ESL 091 - Elements of Writing I (offered in Spain)


    Students are introduced to the process approach to writing and keep a portfolio of their work. Revision techniques are practiced; students address grammatical issues within the context of their writing. Credits for this course do not count towards a degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ESL 092 - Elements of Writing II (offered in Spain)


    The course continues to develop the skills introduced in Elements of Writing I. Students develop a portfolio of their work. In addition, some of the writing assignments are in response to readings, and the final paper involves the use of outside sources. The goal is to prepare students for College Writing Seminar. Credits for this course do not count towards a degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Environmental Science

  •  

    ENV 122/122L - Geology and Lab


    Examines the basic understanding of the history and principles of physical geology and how it affects human civilization. Internal and external structures of the earth as well as geological, physical, and human processes that create structural changes are explored. Laboratory skills apply lecture topics to field experiences. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    ENV 140 - Environmental Biology and Field Studies


    The study of the environment requires students to approach observations from a new perspective along with a fundamental understanding of how organisms interact with each other and their surroundings. Students are introduced to basic biological principles, ecosystem functioning, and community dynamics. Students also learn basic research techniques and proper data handling and processing, and gain first-hand experience with the varied ecosystems accessible from the campus.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENV 150 - Environmental Issues


    Environmental changes and consequences that accompany anthropogenic development and industrialization are discussed. The students actively participate in a chronological and systematic investigation of the connections and relationships between ecological systems, energy, raw materials, western industrialization, environmental degradation, and third world population. The content of the course ultimately serves to establish an historical reference point that allows for analysis of current environmental status and national policy.  Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENV 212 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    The role that Geographic Information Systems (GIS) plays in environmental science has grown dramatically in recent years. This course introduces students to this subject and provides them the skills needed to appropriately analyze spatial data using the GIS software. The class covers basic map concepts, data mining and downloading, field recording and downloading of GPS data, working in the ArcMap10 and the ArcCatalog environment and map creation. Students spend time analyzing data, creating layers, and designing maps.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENV 215/215L - Oceanography and Lab


    A basic investigation of the natural and human originated processes that influence ocean life in the intertidal, coral reef, and continental shelf to deep sea habits. Life patterns, adaptations, and interrelationships of organisms from mammals to plankton are addressed. The laboratory includes campus field work and local field trips. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Prior science study preferred but not required. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    ENV 216 - Natural Disasters and Catastrophes


    A survey of Earth’s surface processes, the course examines the causes, locations, and effects of natural and man-made hazards through scientific inquiry and investigation.  A focus on mitigation strategies is an important component of this course.  Understanding natural hazards as natural processes fosters civic literacy locally, nationally, and globally.  Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENV 220/220L - Environmental Science and Lab


    Relationships between the living and nonliving components of Arctic, Tropical and temperate ecosystems are discovered and compared. Effects of global and local occurrences on the origin and distribution of species and modern practices of conservation are emphasized. The laboratory includes campus field work and local field trips. Prior science study preferred but not required. Class, three hours; lab: 2 hours per week. (Lecture: 3 cr.; Lab: 1cr.) Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 130 or ENV 140, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    ENV 312 - Environmental Health


    This course offers a general introduction to the ecological basis of health and disease including, but not limited to, environmental hazards such as toxic and infectious agents that contaminate our air, water, food, and work place. Policy required for regulation and strategies for mediation are also discussed. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Sophomore class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENV 313 - Modern Conservation: Principles and Practices


    This course advances students’ understanding of organism, ecosystem, and natural resource conservation. The course provides an in-depth understanding of the history of the conservation movement, the science of conservation, theory of conservation practices, and the challenges that face future conservation efforts in light of an ever changing planet. Students are expected to understand and use the tools implemented by practitioners in the conservation field. Students are also introduced to modern conservation techniques and emerging sub-disciplines, such as conservation genetics. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of the scientific method, ecology, and the environment.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENV 140 or BIO 130 and at least one other environmental science/biology course, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENV 338 - Energy, Sustainability, and the Environment


    The complexities and consequences of energy use in our technical society are evaluated and discussed. The course examines and analyzes the fossil fuel era, the multitude of energy sources currently available, and the benefits and environmental costs of each. The course also focuses on the science and mathematics of energy in order to give the students a multidimensional perspective of the most fundamental problem of current and future society.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENV 220 and junior class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENV 375 - Environmental Economics


    This course introduces ecological economics as a trans-disciplinary study with a framework that includes economic, social, and environmental problem solving. The course serves two broad goals: First, to establish a knowledge base in environmental/ecological economics; second, to acquire problem solving skills to address complex social challenges related to the interface of the environment and economics. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    At least one college level ENV or ECON course, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENV 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    ENV 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    ENV 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ENV 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to environmental science in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Exercise Science

  •  

    EX 305 - Exercise Assessment and Prescription


    The purpose of this course is to assist students with exercise testing decision-making and techniques as well as to determine appropriate exercise programming for desired fitness goals. Students learn field and lab assessments of health-related physical fitness and design exercise programs to target specific outcomes in various populations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    AT 215.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    EX 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT100, INT200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    EX 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  • Fifth Year Master of Education

    Fifth Year Master of Nursing Program

    Fine Arts

  •  

    ART 101 - Visual Art and Cultural Values I: Prehistory to c. 1310


    Explores the production of art from prehistory (40,000 BCE) through the Medieval Period (1400 CE). Examines art from a variety of cultures and geographic regions. Introduces students to the conventional designations of stylistic periods, treats major works and artists in this span of time, and familiarizes the student with the traditional methods of art history. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 102 - Visual Art and Cultural Values II: Early Fourteenth Century to the Present


    Examines the production of art from the 15th through the 20th centuries. Explores art from a variety of cultures and geographic regions. Introduces students to the conventional designations of stylistic periods, treats major works and artists of these eras, and acquaints the student with the traditional methods of art history. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 105 - Drawing and Composition I


    Foundation-drawing strategies for visual representation, mark making, and interpretive skills. Focus on still-life, landscape, and figurative sources. Use of black and white charcoal, pencil, inks. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 106 - Drawing and Composition II


    Foundation-drawing emphasis on advanced tasks, skills, and decision-making. Focus on still life, landscape, figurative, and mediated sources. Use of black and white or color charcoal, pastel, pencil, inks, photos.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 110 - Foundations of Creative Therapies


    This introductory course allows students to establish a primary understanding of the history and use of various creative and expressive arts therapy modalities. An underpinning of play, creativity, and imagination will weave together the use of sound, movement, drama, visual arts, and literary arts

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 115 - Two Dimensional Design


    This course examines the fundamental principles of two-dimensional design, including the formal elements of composition and visual organization: line, shape, volume, pattern, texture, space, motion, value, and color. Students  investigate the design elements and principles through a series of studio projects, increasingly exploring the interrelationship between form and content. This course provides a functional and theoretical base for advanced study of art and design.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 121 - Ceramics I


    An appreciation of the craft is developed through an understanding of the basic methods and techniques of designing and creating with clay as a medium. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 123 - Foundation Seminar


    This course introduces students to the conceptual aspects of art production informing studio practice and models cross-discipline learning in the School of Visual and Performing Arts through intense investigation of four main areas: aesthetics, history, practice, and theory. Subtopics treated in the class include the development of studio discipline and investigation, the ethics of the art world, materials and techniques, and intermedia approaches to art making.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 201 - Painting I


    An exploration of painting with respect to drawing and design elements, and the creative use of materials and techniques. Work from a variety of subject matter sources.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 202 - Painting II


    Painting requires sophisticated skills in drawing and design. With the medium of oil paint the students work from observation, memory, imagination, and other sources. Experimentation with the medium and the development of techniques call for students to explore a range of descriptive and expressive effects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 201.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 205 - Three-Dimensional Design


    An introduction to the language of three dimensional experience. An investigation by means of studio projects of the concepts, principles and processes used to generate experientially effective, three-dimensional structures-in-space and structures-of-space. Different applications of principles of three dimensional design are considered, including package and product design, interiors, architecture, and landscaping.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 115 or ID 102, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 207 - Color Theory and Light


    An investigation in the physics and application of color, and how artists and designers control colors’ many characteristics. Students learn how colors interact and affect each other, and how to apply this knowledge to many aspects of art and design. The course ascertains why humans prefer certain colors and color combinations. The historical foundations for color usage are examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 105 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 209 - Methods and Materials in Arts and Expressive Therapy


    Within a studio setting, students will explore creative arts therapy methods, techniques, materials, and equipment through participation in various creative experiences. Students will participate in music making, dancing, dramatic arts, creative writing, visual arts, and integrated arts approaches with the goal of studying their therapeutic effects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 110 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 212 - Sculpture


    The emphasis of sculpture will be assigned studio projects in additive and subtractive sculptural techniques. Basic considerations, fundamental process, and a variety of materials are used to generate desired sculptural form in three dimensions, whether figurative or non-figurative.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 115 or ID 102, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 215 - Advanced Drawing


    Through series work, utilizing a variety of subject matter resources, students expand their drawing vocabulary and increase their understanding and use of theme in variation and visual metaphor. Students learn to examine and prioritize, utilize, and evolve visual ideas.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 106.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 217 - History of Architecture and Interior Design I


    A history of Western European and American architecture and interior design to the late 18th century, including appropriate background in ancient, medieval, Renaissance, and Asian forms and styles. Domestic architecture and interiors and their furniture are emphasized. Periods covered from dynastic Egypt to European and American Neo-Classical styles.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 222 - Ceramics II


    Continuing the concept of developing advanced design techniques through wheelwork, hand-building and sculptural forms.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 121.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 224 - Alternative Processes in Clay


    In this course, students have an opportunity to explore alternative ways in working with clay, including printmaking processes, Xerox transfers, mold-making and many other techniques. Students learn to create support structures for larger pieces, work with the development of surface and experiment with the integration of additional materials. No ceramics experience is required. This course may be applied to work in multi-mediums.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Studio Art course or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 225 - Jung and Art Therapy


    The psychology of C.G. Jung is approached as a theoretical and practical basis for the creative arts therapies and other therapeutic methods.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100 or junior class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 230 - Time-Based Art Media


    This course addresses notions of the image/object and how meaning is alerted through the manipulation of time. Thecourse provides an introduction to the basic practices of time-based art and media; including animation, sound, video, and performance, with emphasis on narrative, planning of action, and sequencing of images. Basic production techniques, project planning, linear and non-linear narrative, and the integration of various media to explore the possibilities of time-based experiences are fundamental components of thecourse.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 105, VC 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 241 - Figure Drawing: Anatomy for Artists


    Artists and designers explore gesture, axis, and dynamics of the human form through drawing and painting. Life drawing, portraiture, and occupational studies are subject matter to be explored utilizing pencil, charcoal, pastel, and water-based paints. The human figure is examined from scientific, social and artistic perspectives, and includes issues of representation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 250 - Printmaking


    Creative exploration and experimentation of printmaking techniques and materials with respect to drawing and design. Emphasis placed on the development of personal responsiveness to the graphic medium. Students work in relief, intaglio, stencil and monotype techniques.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 105 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 255 - Creative Bookmaking


    Creating handmade books allows students an aesthetic experience by exploring the traditional instrument for story telling, communication, and record-keeping. Various adhesive and non-adhesive techniques for binding and assembling books will be explored while addressing issues related to papermaking, journaling, and the unique book as multi-dimensional sculpture. The emphasis is placed on the development of a personal vision, in which students may incorporate in their books a variety of their existing forms of expression, such as graphics, poetry, printmaking, painting, and photography.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 115, or ID 102, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 265 - Arts Administration I


    This course introduces students to the structures, missions, and operations of nonprofit visual and performing arts organizations. Topics include programming and events, facilities, finances, fundraising, intellectual property, marketing, mission statements, history, and staffing. The course utilizes successful models in the metropolitan Boston area to investigate art centers, museums, cooperative galleries, performing arts venues, dance and theater companies, orchestras, and art therapy organizations. Off-campus trips are required.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 266 - Writing in the Arts Seminar


    This seminar introduces students to various types and styles of art writing. It provides practical experience in writing artist statements, press releases, educational materials, exhibition critiques, and critical and historical essays. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ENG 111, ENG 112, or the equivalent.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 270 - Illustration: Character Development


    This studio course includes the research, creation, development, and presentation of student-conceived imaginary characters.  Beginning with development of a solid foundation in human and animal anatomy, students explore different types of “Beings” from scary to cute, and different styles of representation from caricature to realism. Students develop skills for depiction of forms in space through line, mass, and comparative anatomy. The course focuses on developing well thought out fictional characters that are expertly presented in clear line drawings on comprehensive model boards.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 106, GD 105, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 302 - Portfolio


    The portfolio is an essential component of professional practice in the visual arts. Students are introduced to methods of presentation, emphasis, and organization. Students in the course produce a professional portfolio specific to their particular discipline. This process will include editing, sequencing, and designing the portfolio, along with the construction of the actual portfolio book.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status, INT 100 and INT 200, or the equivalent.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 303 - Theory and Research in Visual Design


    Theories and practices of visual design are investigated within the ecological complex of population, technology, social organization, culture, and physical environment. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education and Writing Designated Core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 304 - Advanced Painting


    Explores painting from an aesthetic and philosophical perspective, as well as a creative thought process requiring both inquiry and critical thinking. Students expand their technical and craft knowledge while developing painting as a tool for personal expression. Students also begin the process of creating a unique artistic style and an expansion of their visual vocabulary through exploring various techniques and media.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 202 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 308 - Art in American Culture


    Explores American art from pre-Colonial times to the present. Traces the historical development of architecture, decorative arts, painting, and sculpture. Critically investigates the ever-shifting theoretical definitions, delineation, and constructions of what constitutes American art. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior/senior class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 310 - Cross Cultural Practices of Art Therapy


    An exploration of the archetypal foundations of creative arts therapy practice. Issues of culture are studied in relation to preferences for particular kinds of activities and different ways of responding to the expressions of others. Universal qualities of artistic languages are also examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 209, ART 309, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 311 - Integrating Theory and Practice


    In this course students draw upon theories in psychology and psychotherapy in order to develop a theoretical approach to creative arts therapy.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 110, ART 209.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 313 - History of Architecture and Interior Design II


    A history of Western European and American architecture and interior design from the late 18th century, including appropriate references in ancient, medieval, Renaissance, and Asian forms and styles. Domestic architecture and interiors and their furniture will be emphasized. Periods covered from American Neo-Classical through the 21st century (1790-2002). Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 315 - Women and the Arts


    Investigates both images of women and images by women in the arts. Traces the historical evidence for women artists in ancient periods, surveys women artists of historical periods, and explores theories and methods about the links between gender and art production. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior/senior class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 317 - History of Photography


    Surveys the history and development of photography worldwide from the 1830s to the present. Examines technical developments and implications, genres, and subjects such as documentary, portrait, and landscape. Themes, such as Modernism and Postmodernism and their effect on photographic praxis and perception, are also explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 102.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 319 - Art of the Mediterranean Basin: Egypt, Greece, and Italy in Antiquity


    Art history seminar exploring topics of art and archaeology of the Mediterranean: Egypt, Greece and Italy from the Bronze Age (c. 3000 BCE) to the end of the Roman Imperial period (c. 410 CE). Covers such topics as religion and mythology, gender relations, the view and treatment of foreigners and slaves, politics and art, and contemporary constructions of antiquity. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior/senior class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 320 - Native American Art: Beyond Tradition


    A survey of the arts of indigenous people of North America, this course covers pre-Columbian artifacts through late 20th century art currently in production. Special attention is given to the anthropological context of art and artifacts, as well as their materials, function, and meaning. Satisfies the Writing Designated Core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 101, ART 102, or AMS 101, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 322 - Contemporary Art in a Global Context


    This course treats contemporary art that encompasses a wide range of formal, philosophical, and theoretical practices. The class examines a variety of issues impacting contemporary art, such as post-colonialism, nomadism, border crossing, transnationalism and globalization. Traditional, as well as new media (performance art, installation, conceptual, digital, and internet art), are studied.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior/senior class status and ART 102.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 323 - Media and Metaphor: Nature


    Students investigate themes relating to nature utilizing various media including auditory, computer graphics, drawing, painting, photography, video, or writing. Readings and field experiences serve as catalyst for the creative combination of unique works that cross media boundaries. Projects are developed both individually and collaboratively. Satisfies Writing Designated Core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior/senior class staus and ART 102.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 324 - Music and Creative Arts Therapy


    This course investigates how music can be used to help create positive change in physical and emotional health. It examines the history, clinical terminology, documentation, theories, principles, and therapeutic intervention of music therapy. Musical proficiency is not required to enroll in the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 330 - Dance Movement and Creative Arts Therapy


    Within a studio setting, students explore the therapeutic and expressive aspects of dance/movement experiences. Theory and application are studied with the goal of investigating the therapeutic effects of dance/movement therapy in educational, psychiatric, physical, and rehabilitation settings. Additional creative modalities are introduced.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 334 - Photographic Imagery on Clay and Glass


    In this course students manipulate and integrate digital, photographic, and hand drawn imagery onto clay and glass surfaces. Utilizing a variety of techniques, students creatively explore the overlap between the photographic image, clay and glass. Students, additionally, work with a variety of processes to develop their personal creative expression. Students in the class also study contemporary artists working with photographic imagery on clay, and glass.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT116 and either ART121 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 335 - Advanced Ceramics


    In this advanced level course, students strengthen their conceptual and technical skills in ceramics through their progressive work with ceramic materials and techniques. Through traditional and experimental processes, students gain a wide range of knowledge and further develop their personal language in clay.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART121, ART222 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 340 - Advanced Art Studio


    This course will provide an opportunity for upper-level studio art students to develop depth of study and strengthen their studio practice in their chosen studio disciplines. The course progressively challenges the student artist to articulate and critique their own and others’ works in an effective way. Students gain continued exposure to historical and contemporary artists and art-making practices.  Class meetings include weekly advanced studio critiques, development of process, and visiting artists. A series of finished works of art or other comparable significant artwork is required.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BFA junior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 402 - Theories and Methods of Art History


    Studies the theoretical and methodological foundations of art history. Examines the growth of the field and critiques the underlying assumptions brought to bear on the study of the history of art. Satisfies the Writing Designated Core requirement

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 101, ART 102, and senior class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 404 - Imagination and Creativity


    This seminar course helps each student develop an awareness of his or her own creative process. Students learn to generate strategies for enhancing creativity through readings and discussion. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    ART 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ART 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to art, in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Foreign Languages

    French

  •  

    FR 101 - Elementary French


    This course introduces the foundational elements of the French language, and builds conversation and grammar skills. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    FR 201 - Intermediate French I


    For students who have a basic knowledge of French or have completed a semester of the language. This course builds conversational and grammatical proficiency with particular attention given to reading and writing in the language. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FR 101 or two or more years of French coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    FR 202 - Intermediate French II


    For students who have had two or more years of French language coursework, this course builds conversation and grammatical skills with particular attention to spoken language. Students do not need to take FR 201 or FR 202 in sequence. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FR 101 or two or more years of French coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    FR 300 - Advanced Topics in French


    Taught in French, this course provides students with the opportunity to further develop their understanding of the French language through a focus on conversation, film, fiction, the media, or poetry. Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    FR 201, FR 202, or four or more years of French coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Gender Studies

    Geography

    Graphic Design

  •  

    ART 237 - History of Graphic Design


    This course explores the history of graphic design from prehistory to the present. The class introduces students to the major historical developments and their influence in the production of graphic design. This class familiarizes students with a variety of graphic design approaches within an overview of the major historical, social and cultural developments. Traditional, as well as new media forms of design are studied.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 102 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  • History

  •  

    HST 101 - Western Civilization I


    A survey of European history from earliest times to the Renaissance. Included in the topics for discussion are Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, and the rise of Europe in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 102 - Western Civilization II


    A survey of European developments from the 17th century to the contemporary period. Emphasis is placed on the “modernization” of European politics and thought, particularly during the Enlightenment, and during the 19th and 20th centuries. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 103 - United States History I


    A survey of the early American experience from European discoveries to the Civil War. Topics considered include the Colonial era, the American Revolution, early political developments, and the origins of industrialization. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 104 - United States History II


    A survey of more recent American history from Reconstruction to our present era. Topics considered include “Big Business,” the Spanish American War, the Progressive Era, World War I, the Depression, the New Deal, and World War II. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 110 - World History I


    Introduces students to history through an examination of the connections between societies and the relationships between human beings and the environment. Topics to be considered in this course include: the emergence of homo sapiens, early agrarian societies, the rise of world religions, the function and anatomy of land empires, the relationship between agricultural and pastoral economies, the emergence of global trade, and the nature of European, Asian, African, and American societies, cultures, and intellectual traditions until 1500. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 111 - World History II


    Surveys world history from the beginning of the Atlantic world system to the present. This course examines the major questions in the history of the modern world. Topics include: European maritime empires, the rise of Eurasian land empires, environmental change, settlement and displacement, the Atlantic world, the Pacific world, industrialization, global capitalism, and ideas with a global reach. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

     

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    HST 201 - Contemporary Approaches to History


    Surveys recent trends in historical research and writing and analyzes the contested nature of history and collective memory in contemporary society. Using models of scholarship on history in the United States and abroad, the course examines the kinds of evidence and prisms (e.g. politics, race, gender, nation, culture) historians use to interpret the past and the kinds of history (e.g. narrative, comparative, and biographical) they write. Required of all history majors and minors, but open to any interested students..

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 218 - Topics in World History


    Each section of this course explores in depth a different aspect of world history, such as the history of a country, region, cultural or political movement. Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 225 - The Salem Witch Trials


    Explores the history of and myths surrounding the Salem witch trials, and, more generally, the politics of scapegoating. Readings, including trial transcripts, focus on the origin, development, and legacy of the trials, and on Puritanism, witchcraft, legal practices, and the status of women in colonial-era New England. Visits to local historical sites enhance understanding of the trials. The course also examines more recent witch-hunts and instances of hysteria associated with McCarthyism, AIDS, the bombing of Pearl Harbor, and the September 11 terrorist attacks. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 226 - Early American History and Literature


    An interdisciplinary examination of the American past up to and including the Civil War. Course covers American Indian history and culture prior to and after the arrival of European settlers; the founding of the republic; and the ideals, contradictions, and emerging identity of a growing nation. Students study key events, institutions, reform campaigns, and literary movements, and the broader cultural and ideological contexts in which they arose. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 227 - Boston History


    Surveys the history of Boston from the colonial era to the present. Examines the legacy of the Puritan presence in the 17thcentury, the city’s role in the Revolutionary War, the immigrant experience, reform movements, race relations, urban planning, and politics.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 229 - The American West


    Surveys the history of the American West from the pre-colonial era to the recent past. Topics include the Lewis and Clark expedition; the impact of westward expansion and government policies on Native Americans; the significance of the frontier in American history and culture; the building of the transcontinental railroad; the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II; and the West in popular culture. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 230 - African-American History


    A survey of the unique history, contributions and struggles of African Americans from 1619 to the present including: slavery; the abolitionist movement; the emergence of free black communities; the Civil War; emancipation and Reconstruction; segregation in the Jim Crow South; African American leadership and institution building in the North; Blacks during the depression and the roots of the post-WWII Civil Rights Movement. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 235 - Public History


    Examines how history is publicly presented and interpreted in museums, historic preservation projects, heritage trails, commemorative public art, civic celebrations, and feature films and documentaries.  Students learn about best practices and potential career paths in public history and the field’s relationship to “academic” history and the heritage industry.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 245 - The History of Modern China


    This course is a survey of Chinese history from 1800 to the contemporary period. The course examines the experience and interpretation of the 1911 Revolution, the Nationalist Revolution, the Communist Revolution, and the Cultural Revolution. The course also considers the role of the West in China’s development, China’s place in the East Asian world, intellectual trends, economic transformation, the natural environment, and the dilemmas of modernity for Chinese governments, intellectuals, and working people. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 260 - Modern Latin American History and Culture


    Surveys the history and culture of Latin America from its struggle for independence to the recent past. Examines the geography and economy of Latin America and the role of religion and race in the region. Political traditions in Latin America, e.g. dictatorships and movements for democracy, and the region’s role in international affairs and its relationship to the United States, will also be covered. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 280 - Middle East History


    Focuses on the history of the Middle East from 600 C.E. to the present, encompassing the beginnings of Islam, migration of peoples, and the development and transformation of early and modern Middle Eastern empires, including politics, society, and economy.  The course also looks at the integration of the Middle East in the world economic and political system, the nature and impact of imperialism, at cultural, intellectual, artistic, and political movements, and the position of the Middle East in the world today.  Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 302 - Russia: From Revolution to the Post-Soviet Era


    This course examines the origins of the socialist system in Russia and the rise and eventual demise of the Soviet system. Topics include the collapse of Czarist Russia, the rise of Marxist-Leninist ideology, the Bolshevik Revolution, the Stalin era, the evolution of a post-totalitarian Soviet system, and the international implications of Soviet globalism, during the Cold War especially. Attention is also given to challenges Russia has faced in the post-Soviet era as it struggles to modernize. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HST 102.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 306 - New England History


    This course examines the history of the region from the Colonial era to the recent past.  Among the topics studied are indigenous peoples, religion, slavery, immigration, reform movements, politics, the whaling and textile industries, technology and innovation, regional identity, and New England’s contributions to American history and culture.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     

     

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    HST 310 - Economies and Peoples


    A broad survey of world economic history from the earliest times to the present. The causes and effects of economic change and expansion are studied. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 317 - Civil Rights Movement


    A survey of the unique set of events, circumstances and struggles that shaped the United States in the 1950’s and 60’s collectively known as the Civil Rights Movement. This course offers an analytical examination of the freedom movement that continues to this day by looking at the African-American struggle for freedom, justice, and equality. This course also examines the movement’s overlap with feminist, Chicano, Native American, and gay liberation movements. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 340 - Women in American History and Culture


    Surveys the history of American women from the Colonial era to the present, analyzing their struggles for gender equity and gains in business, education, politics, athletics, and other realms. The course examines women’s movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, and the portrayal of women in the media. Adopting a multicultural and multiracial perspective, the course compares and contrasts the experiences of women differentiated by race, ethnicity, class, and geographic region. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 350 - The Automobile in American Life


    Touching on the history of American labor, technology, business, culture, cities, and design, this course examines how the automobile has revolutionized American society over the last century. The ways in which an American “car culture” changed social mores, created new leisure opportunities, and spurred the development of suburbs, roadside architecture, and auto-oriented institutions such as motels and strip malls are also explored. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    HST 380 - Environmental History


    Examines how the environment has shaped history and how human enterprise has impacted the natural world. The course surveys early European attitudes towards nature, but focuses primarily on the United States: Native Americans’ relationship with nature; the significance of private property and the frontier; and the environmental consequences of the scientific revolution, industrialization, urbanization, and modern consumer culture. Topics include the history of public parks, water supplies, and sanitation systems in American cities, and the rise of the modern environmental movement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    HST 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HST 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to history in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Hospitality Management

  •  

    HTM 101 - Foundations of Hospitality Management


    An introduction to the industry of hospitality and tourism, this course emphasizes the management process and department operations.  Hotels, cruise lines, casinos, travel agencies, restaurants, spas, events, senior communities, and airlines are examined in regard to classification, markets, and operations.  This course is also designed to gain understanding into the relationship that exists between hospitality and tourism.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 108 - Rooms Division Management


    Every transaction generated in the hotel can be traced back to the front office. Through a management perspective, emphasis is placed on operations, finance and interdepartmental communication.  Connections between various hotel departments and their contribution to the overall success of the guest experience and profitability of the hotel are analyzed.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 110 - Service Management


    Balanced between theoretical and applied learning in La Chanterelle, our non-traditional classroom, students explore the function of service systems within the restaurant environment. The course surveys the development and implementation of both dining and beverage delivery systems, their cost control, and management. A combination of interpersonal, leadership and group dynamics skills is applied to service encounters to illustrate the complexities of guest satisfaction.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 140 - Culinary Arts Operations


    Balanced between theoretical and applied learning in La Chanterelle, our non-traditional classroom, students explore the function of food preparation within the restaurant environment. Focus is on hygienic production, preparations, and presentation. Purchasing and cost control are examined to ensure operational profitability.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 213 - Hospitality Sales and Marketing


    The service sector has distinctive features in its marketing and sales strategy. An in-depth examination of the unique principles and practices of marketing service sector versus manufactured products. Emphasis is placed on market research, target markets, promotions, and advertising. The impact of sales is analyzed from the perspective of multiple vantage points including buyer, seller, and corporate.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 214 - Sustainable Tourism


    A study of the underlying principles and practices in domestic and international tourism, this course includes issues that contribute to travel and tourism development. Focus is on the economic, social/cultural and ecological, impacts of tourism and how policy and planning play a role in creating sustainability in traditional and emerging markets.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 225 - Hospitality Management Accounting


    Assessment of control practices, financial analysis, and pricing decisions for the hospitality industry.  Emphasis is placed on revenue management, forecasting, budgeting, cost management, and effective decision making with the use of timely, accurate, and meaningful accounting information. Focus is placed on the preparation, evaluation, and analysis of financial statements.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HTM 116.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 250 - Food and Beverage Management


    Restaurant management is analyzed from an operational and financial standpoint.  Student learn the basic financial concepts important in operating a profitable foodservice facility.  Menu management is discussed from a psychological viewpoint to influence guest decisions to purchase the items that are more profitable to the restaurant.  Internal control processes are examined to protect the assets of a restaurant.  Layout and design considerations are studied to ensure proper functionality of restaurants.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 255 - Fundamentals of Events


    Students explore and develop an understanding of the events/entertainment field. The focus is on the historical development, organizational structure, and career opportunities that exist within the discipline. The course introduces students to the methods and techniques utilized in planning organizing and delivering events.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 310 - Hotel Events Sales and Service


    This course is designed to give students practical insight into the different types of meetings and conventions and how to reach and sell to these markets. Emphasis is given to convention service activities that take place after the market has been sold.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 315 - The History and Appreciation of Wine


    Students explore how wine is woven into modern day traditions and cultures, with its history dating back 8,000 years. French and American wines and the way they illustrate the larger differences in philosophies between Old and New World wines form a major focus of the course. The wine making process, viticulture, and market trends are also discussed. The sensory evaluation of wine is a
    component of this course; consequently students must be 21 years of age.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Age 21, senior class status, and permission of instructor. Course Fee: $50.00

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 318 - Events Management


    Every event creates unique production issues. Emphasis is placed on teamwork, problem solving, conflict resolution, and the major operational components of the events. Students are involved in the planning, preparation, management, and delivery of a themed event. Students are exposed to real life challenges including analytical thinking, individual decision making, and financial documentation.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 320 - The Cultural History of Food


    Survey concentrated on food and its historical impact on civilizations from prehistoric to present. An overview of the development of agricultural practices and their relationship to global and regional cuisine. Food as a cultural identifier, its role in commerce, and the advent of the restaurant are examined. Satisfies the World Culture General Education requirement.
     

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 330 - Hospitality Facilities Design


    Introduce students to the phases of design and principles of space planning of a hospitality facility. The focus is on design components including space planning, building systems, and code compliance. Students gain an overview of the design process and all the key players in the industry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HTM 110, HTM 250.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 350 - Resort Management


    A study of the operations of resorts, condominiums, and timeshares applying management functions of the hospitality industry. Special emphasis is given to the interrelationships of these various aspects including the financing of these enterprises, management, and discretionary tourism.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 355 - Casino Operations


    Gaming is a vital sector of the hospitality industry. Topics in this course include gaming trends, casino organizational structure, government regulations, consumer behavior, marketing strategies, economic impact, social and cultural concerns, and the mathematics of casino games.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 360 - Hospitality Legal Perspectives


    An exploration of the potential legal liability of hospitality managers in contract and agency relationships. Topics include the impact of government regulations and their Relationship to management responsibilities in the hospitality industry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class hospitality status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 365 - International Hospitality Management


    An extensive overview of the complexities of managing hospitality operations in an international environment. Students examine the ethical, economic, and geopolitical risks involved with developing a sustainable hospitality enterprise.  The challenges of cultural differences that confront management in employee development as well as meeting the needs of guests in emerging markets are explored.  

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HTM 374.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 370 - Hospitality Entrepreneurship


    An overview of the complexities involved in developing a new business in the hospitality industry. Financing, marketing, and human resources will be explored within the context of starting a hospitality venture. The influence of leadership is illustrated through examples of successful hospitality entrepreneurs.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior hospitality status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 372 - Events Risk Management


    Risk is an inherent factor anytime people gather for an event. From a supervisory perspective, risk is analyzed, evaluated, and assessed, from both a proactive and post crisis posture. Focus is directed at creating and maintaining a secure environment for all stakeholders connected with the event. A critical understanding of how each venue requires its own unique parameters for risk management is explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HTM 255.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 374 - Hospitality Organizational Behavior


    This course explores the fundamental components of organizational behavior through a comprehensive investigation of management, leadership, and culture within the hospitality industry.  Using an examination of industry practitioners, readings and text, students construct various conceptual frameworks to comprehend hospitality organizations.  Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.
     

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 380 - Management of Corporate Events


    An exploration into the profession of meeting management, this course emphasizes functional responsibilities such as contract negotiation, site selection, program planning and design, and conference marketing. Students apply the concepts of adult education to the dynamics of the meeting market. The theory of group hotel/conference sales is highlighted.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HTM 255.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 382 - Management of Special Events


     A comprehensive study of the social events industry focused on emphasizing the dynamics of the creative process critical to these events. Social events include but are not limited to weddings, ceremonies and celebration, life cycle events, and fairs and festivals. Through the event planning process social events are examined from a logistical, legal, and financial perspective.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HTM 255.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 410 - Service Practicum I


    The course provides stagiares the basics of supervising and managing hospitality students within the domain of customer relations. The students are required to ensure the proper level of service standards are maintained in the nontraditional classroom.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 415 - Hospitality Strategic Management


    The culmination of a student’s academic and work experience is applied to management situations in the hospitality industry. The knowledge and techniques learned in earlier courses and internships are applied in an integrated fashion to the process of strategic decision making and organizational change. Using management tools and models, students analyze specific hospitality case studies and formulate strategies leading to ethical and sustainable operational recommendations.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 420 - Service Practicum II


    Development of an understanding of the current literature base of service quality research. Current service quality research is applied in the non-traditional classroom. The course provides stagiares with the basics of supervising and managing hospitality students within the domain of customer Relations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HTM 410.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 430 - Service Practicum III


    Creation of synergy between theoretical and practical components in the non-traditional classroom. Stagiares develop effective methods of delivery in an educational setting. Promotes teamwork and mentoring with novice stagiares.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HTM 410, HTM 420.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    HTM 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to hospitality, in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Hotel Management

  •  

    HTM 335 - Hotel Revenue Management


    This course investigates how the combination of price, supply and demand can optimize revenue objectives to ensure maximum profitability. This course focuses on how the organization should set and update price and product availability across its distribution channels in order to increase revenue. Students review the main revenue management methodologies that are utilized by the hospitality industry. Issues of legality and customer response are examined within the context of price optimization.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HTM 108.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HTM 400 - Contemporary Issues in Hospitality


    This upper level course explores, in depth, a current area in hospitality. Topics and course descriptions will change from semester to semester. Examples of topics may include social media networking, gaming, social responsibility and human resources. Students may take more than one section of this course providing the topic is different from one section to the next.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Human Services

  •  

    HMS 100 - Introduction to Human Services


    This course provides an introduction to the various aspects of the human services field. Particular attention is given to the professional roles, issues, and strategies that are found in the helping profession. This course is intended to assist students in evaluating their interest, motivation, and capabilities for professional work in the human services field.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HMS 187 - Mozambique Service Project (Offered in Spain)


    This project is a joint venture between the College for International Studies (CIS) and the two NGOs Cruzada por los Niños (Madrid) and Fundación Mozambique Sur (Massaca).  It is designed for students in all fields who want to explore the structure, importance, and mission of NGOs on location.  To provide students with an appropriate context, a five-week course introduceS them to Mozambican history, politics, culture, environmental, educational, and social issues.  This course is complemented by a one-week internship activity in Massaca/Mozabique in which they share the unique experience of active volunteer work for the NGO Cruzada por los Niños.  Supporting the Massaca orphanage program helpS them develop important social and intercultural skills, but also profoundly contributeS to their personal development as responsible global citizens.

    (Cr: 2)
  •  

    HMS 300 - Contemporary Issues in Human Services


    Examines current issues in the human services field and investigates selected subjects with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field. The specific theories, subject matter, and techniques focus on the human services system and how it can be improved. Students are also required to examine alternatives to the current system and the practicality of their implementation. Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as course content is new.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HMS 100 and junior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HMS 305 - Social Policy


    Examines the principles, guidelines, and concepts that direct social action and policy. The concept of advocacy and legislative action are discussed. Policy issues to be addressed include housing, health care, families, the elderly, and the poor.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HMS 100, PSY 100 or SOC 101.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HMS 310 - Crisis Intervention


    This course presents theories, strategies, and skills and an overall introduction to clinical crisis intervention. Models for assessing and responding to crises are presented. Topics such as medical and psychological traumas, post-traumatic stress disorder, and professional burnout is part of the curriculum. Special emphasis is given to disaster psychology, natural disasters, terrorism, school violence, and suicidology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HMS 100 or PSY 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HMS 324 - Addictive Behaviors


    The physical and psychosocial impact of addictions is explored with an emphasis upon the involvement of professionals from different disciplines. Research studies on the prevalence, causes, and problems associated with addictive behaviors are explored, as well as related policy questions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    HMS 100 or PSY 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HMS 327 - The Victimization of Children


    This course covers the history of child victimization as a social problem, its dynamics, prevalence, outcomes, research issues, how the media treats child victimizations, and contemporary policies. The course focuses on child victimization in the United States, but also examines international victimization of children. The goal of this course is to provide students with a broad understanding of childhood victimization and the resources available to address it.  The course is also intended to cultivate the knowledge and skills that allow students to critically evaluate representations of childhood victimization in a variety of contexts.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HMS 330 - Non-Profits for Social Change: Philanthropy in Action


    Students study the history, philosophy, and religious foundations of philanthropy in the United States; explore philanthropy as a vehicle of social change and reform; reflect on philanthropy as an expression of psychological and moral development; and gain first-hand experience of philanthropy by forming a model foundation that awards small grants to nonprofit organizations in the community.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    HMS 387 - Costa Rican Culture and Community Service Project


    A semester-long course that culminates in a community service project in Costa Rica. Important themes in intercultural communication, service learning, and Costa Rican history and contemporary culture are explored. The in-country component consists of a cultural orientation in Costa Rica followed by a service project and an evaluation retreat. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One semester of college level Spanish and acceptance into the course during the spring of the preceding year.

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    HMS 440 - Understanding and Treating Sexual Trauma: Theory, Research and Practice


    Provides an overview of research factors that both increase and decrease trauma suffered by victims of sexual abuse. All forms of sexual victimization are addressed including sexual assault, date rape, incest, child sexual abuse, sexual harassment, clergy abuse, and rape in times of civil strife or war. Myths and misconceptions are explored, as well as historical and global implications. Strategies for completing sexual victim trauma assessments for all ages of victims are taught as well as more advanced and “cutting edge” techniques for treating victims of sexual victimization.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100 and PSY 335, and junior class status, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Humanities

    Integrated Studies

    Interior Design

  •  

    ID 101 - Introduction to Interior Design


    Students are introduced to the basic elements of interior architectural design. The design process, color theory, design language and tectonics, and design principles are covered through lectures and 2D and 3D studio projects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Corequisite: ID 103.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 102 - Interior Design Studio I


    Students apply the basic elements of interior architectural design to residential and small commercial studio projects, to develop an understanding of the design process. This includes project research, project programming, creative problem solving (with and emphasis on the fundamental elements and principals of design), space planning, the selection of interior design products, color theory, and the fundamentals of visual and oral project presentation in preparation for advanced studio work.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 105, ID 101, ID 103.

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    ID 103 - Media I: Drafting


    In the field of interior architectural design the thought and the method of expression are equally important. Students learn to communicate their design ideas through the use of both instrumental and freehand drawings. The course covers the production of orthographic, multi-view, isometric, oblique, and perspective drawings. Diverse media and color are explored, as well as, English and metric units of measure.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 104 - Media II: Interior/Exterior Delineation


    Students continue to develop skills introduced in Media I: Drafting in 3D exploration of interior space through the production of one-point, two-point, and three-point perspective delineation with the use of technical instruments, freehand drawings, and computer generated studies. Students are introduced to a variety of technically assisted drawing techniques and 3-D computer-aided design software.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 103.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 201 - Interior Design Studio II A


    The design and programming process is applied to projects of increasing complexity and scope with consideration given to retail uses. Students advance their design knowledge and implementation through advanced programming and user analysis incorporating human factors, universal design, environmental systems, psychological implications, and life safety codes.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ART 102, ART 105, ID 102, and ID 104.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 202 - Interior Design Studio II B


    The design process is applied to projects of increasing size and complexity with a focus in Contract Design. Students are introduced to more advanced programming, concept development, schematic design, design development and presentation. Special focus on Universal Design, space programming and planning, integration of codes and systems furniture for commercial and corporate environments is explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 209, ID 220, ID 247 or permission of instructor.​

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 207 - Construction Materials I: Materials and Specifications


    Students investigate the properties of interior finishes, furniture, and textiles. The appropriate selection and specification of materials based upon code, occupant comfort, universal design, sustainability, and aesthetics is researched. Life cycle analysis and life cycle costing and software analysis tools are used to determine the source, manufacture, use, transportation, and disposal of a product. Viable information sources for sustainable products are explored.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 102, ID 103, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 208 - Media III: Rendering


    Advanced communication skills are developed through sketching, delineation, drafting, and rendering techniques specifically geared toward effective design presentations. Various rendering techniques and media are explored with an emphasis placed on the effective graphic communication of design ideas in plan, section, elevation, and 3D.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 101, ID 104, ART 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 209 - Construction Materials II: Building Systems


    Students begin to explore the technical and aesthetic aspects of structure, environmental systems including plumbing, electrical, HVAC system types, natural ventilation, energy efficiency, zero energy building, and renewable energy systems, lighting (natural and artificial), and acoustics and their impact on the built and natural environments. The appropriate selection of technologies based on codes, universal design, sustainability, function and aesthetics, and human comfort are explored and evaluated for interior spaces.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 102, ID 103, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 220 - Electronic Media I


    This course is intended to give students a set of strategies for incorporating technology and electronic workflow strategies into their design work. Students learn techniques for managing and integrating the entire design process using a number of software titles, from programmatic diagrams to construction drawings and perspective renderings. The main focus is on the most common type of architectural software used today, building information modeling (BIM). Use of custom objects and best practices for creating presentations are also discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 103, ID 104, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 230 - Electronic Media II


    This course builds on skills and knowledge gained in Electronic Media I. Various types of software are employed, as are strategies for presentations using a number of different formats, including physical prints, linear electronic presentations, and animations. Techniques for generating more sophisticated renderings and other types of presentations are explored, with an emphasis on efficiency of translation from one piece of software to the next. Effective techniques for communication at different stages of design are examined.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 207, ID 208, ID 220.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 234 - Building Codes and Standards


    This course introduces students to the intent, scope, detail, and examination of local, state, national, and international building codes, standards, and regulations that protect the health, safety, and welfare of the general public in new and existing materials and methods of construction. Emphasis is given to the international, federal, state, local and professional standards. Students also develop an understanding of universal design and the Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    ID 247 - Environmental Psychology


    An exploration of the relationship between humans and their environment through the study of personal and social use of space, proxemics, spatial analysis, universal design, and the effects of the environment on human behavior.

    (Cr: 2)
  •  

    ID 301 - Advanced Interior Design Studio III A


    The design and programming process is applied to projects of increasing complexity and scope with consideration given to hospitality and institutional uses. Students advance their design knowledge and implementation through advanced programming and user analysis incorporating universal design, environmental systems, and life safety codes.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 202, ID 207, ID 209, ID 230, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 302 - Interior Design Studio III B: Health Care and Institutional Design


    The design and programming process is applied to projects of increasing complexity and scope with consideration given to institutional design and health care design. Students advance their design knowledge and implementation through advanced integrated design programming strategies, concept development, schematic design, design development and presentation. Special focus on environmentally responsible design, universal design, space programming and planning, integration of codes, environmental assessment tools and rating systems for sustainable environments.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 202, ID 209, ID 230, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 307 - Advanced Lighting Design Studio (Lighting Studio)


    The principles of interior lighting design and integrated building systems are explored through lectures and studio projects to develop an understanding of design solutions that meet the sustainable, aesthetic, functional, and regulatory needs of residential and commercial interior spaces. Topics such as day-lighting, energy consumption, energy codes, heat production, light trespass, and light pollution are addressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 207, ID 209, ID 230, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 308 - Construction and Materials IV - Contract Documents Studio


    Contract documents are prepared combining knowledge of architectural, structural, environmental systems, interior construction detailing, architectural millwork, and furniture design and detailing. Detailing theory and processes are explored and supported by the exploration of material technology, constructions processes, and finish systems research.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 207, ID 209, ID 230, ID 307, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 310 - Professional Practice/Portfolio


    This course examines the professional practice of interior design. Students advance their knowledge in the business components necessary to engage the profession. The course carefully studies leadership, project management, financial management, client management, marketing, and business development as well as strategies for integrated design. Current issues confronting the professional such as licensure, professional organization, and community service are discussed. The development of a professional design portfolio is also a major focus of this course. This course serves as the prerequisite for the fourth year senior internship experience in a professional design firm that solidifies experiential learning between the classroom and the profession.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 300 level courses or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 312 - Advanced Media and Presentation Delineation


    Advanced visual communication skills are developed through three-dimensional presentations employing diverse methods of rendering. Various composition strategies and techniques are explored, with an emphasis on clarity and richness of the drawings. Multiple media are utilized, with critique of their relative merits. Students explore, articulate and execute a sense of their own stylistic preferences within the context of comprehensive drawing communication.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 230, ID 301 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 2)
  •  

    ID 320 - Global Sustainable Interior Design Studio


    A global look at sustainable interior design strategies that are applied to studio projects of increasing size and complexity. Students are introduced to advanced integrated design programming, concept development, schematic design, design development, and presentation. Special focus on international environmentally responsible design, universal design, building codes, environmental assessment tools, and sustainable design rating systems. Students select from commercial, institutional, and residential environments to be further investigated within a studio setting. The “study abroad component” of the course includes pre-departure orientation seminars covering all aspects of the tour: opportunities for investigation, group dynamics, problem solving, and team spirit created by cohesiveness within the classroom. During the March spring break, students participate in a professionally led study and research opportunity in a host country. Students investigate sustainable design issues, philosophies, and practice of other cultures, as well as historical context.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 350 - Design Theory and Research Seminar


    This course is a survey of the cultural, aesthetic, technological, political, economic and social theories that have shaped and been shaped by contemporary design. Students explore the relationship of design and the built environment and its impact on human behavior. Through the course lectures, readings and discussions, students explore evaluation methods to be able to understand criticism and dialogue within the profession. Further, students explore current research methods in design. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ID 247, ID 301.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    ID 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ID 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to interior design, in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • International Studies

  •  

    IST 100 - Introduction to International Studies


    This introductory, interdisciplinary course exposes students to critical global issues through the lens of the arts, humanities, social, and physical sciences. The course makes connections between seemingly disparate events, and contextualizes those events in an historical period. Each discussion considers temporal political, socio-economic, and geographic as well as cultural issues in the given context. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    IST 215 - The New Europe


    An overview of the historical development of European political and cultural identity from 1947 to present day. One of the major elements of the course is the study of common economic policies, as well as the introduction of the Euro and its impact on global relations. In addition, this course examines the future challenges presented by the growth of the European Union, its stability and the question of the European constitutional and institutional reforms. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    IST 216 - International Conflicts


    Examines the theoretical and practical aspects of international conflicts in the “global” era. By applying the method of comparative analysis and the “case study” approach, the course will examine how conflicts arise and evolve, and how technological, institutional, and cultural effects of globalization make international conflict more complex and less manageable. A special focus is on conflict prevention and settlement, and peace-making processes. The course also compares international negotiation styles and practices, including negotiations with terrorists. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    IST 280 - Global Political Economy


    Examines the changing nature of the international political economy, from theoretical and practical perspectives. Both traditional and globalization-related issues of global political economy are studied: states and markets in a global era, institutions of global economic governance, trade, interdependence, imperialism, the politics of markets, and the global financial system. Students examine key determinants of foreign economic policies of states, the prospects of economic integration, the development of trade regimes at the regional and global level, the causes of financial crises, and strategies to combat them. Special emphasis is placed on the character and consequences of global economic interdependence, world inequality and development, global flows of capital, and direct foreign investment.  Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.
     

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    IST 315 - Intercultural Communication


    Exploration of the interdisciplinary field of intercultural communication. Emphasis is on increasing communicative competencies in cross-cultural settings. Drawing from the fields of anthropology, communication, linguistics, psychology, and sociology, this course is designed for students who wish to gain the practical skills necessary to communicate effectively in today’s interdependent international community.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    IST 325 - World Geography


    A comprehensive study of regional world geography. The focus is on both physiographic characteristics of each region as well as their human culture traits such as population, economics, language, religion, and urban space. Emphasis is placed on the interaction between the culture and environment of various regions. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    IST 379 - Semester Internship Strategies



    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)

  •  

    IST 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    IST 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    IST 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to international studies in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Italian

  •  

    ITL 101 - Elementary Italian


    This course introduces the foundational elements of the Italian language and builds conversation and grammar skills. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ITL 201 - Intermediate Italian I


    For students who have a basic knowledge of Italian or have completed a semester of the language. This course builds conversational and grammatical proficiency with particular attention given to reading and writing in the language. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ITL 101 or one or two years of Italian coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    ITL 202 - Intermediate Italian II


    For students who have had two or more semesters of Italian language. This course builds conversational and grammatical proficiency with particular attention to spoken language. Students do not need to take ITL 201 or ITL 202 in sequence. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ITL 101 or two or more years of Italian coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Japanese

    Legal Studies

    Liberal Studies

  •  

    LST 101 - Readings in the Liberal Arts I (offered in Spain)


    Students explore topics of study related to a variety of academic disciplines within the liberal arts—psychology, art, history, and philosophy. Class discussions as well as reading and writing assignments introduce students to the terminology, concepts, and issues associated with each of the areas of study while developing English proficiency. As appropriate, guest speakers are invited to give mini-lectures. Credits are applicable toward the degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 102 - Readings in the Liberal Arts II (offered in Spain)


    This course continues the exploration of academic disciplines begun in Readings in the Liberal Arts I and focuses on topics in sociology, literature, American culture, and science. Reading, writing, and research assignments along with class discussions and presentations help students develop a basic understanding of the terminology, concepts, and issues associated with each of the areas of study. As appropriate, guest speakers are invited to give mini-lectures, and students have the opportunity to observe classes in the various disciplines. Credits are applicable toward the degree.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 108 - Topics in Languages


    Each section of this course provides students with an introduction to a different foreign language, including Japanese, Portuguese, and German. Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 201 - Interdisciplinary Seminar


    This team-taught course creates opportunities for students to discover and apply perspectives and approaches from at least two disciplines in the study of social and cultural issues, trends, phenomena, and problems. Topics will change each semester. Students may take more than one interdisciplinary seminar provided the topics differ.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 202 - Place-Based Immersion Experience


    In this faculty-led, field-based experience, students conduct research over a weekend in a New England location that possesses cultural, historic, or environmental significance. Prior to departure, students participate in workshops to prepare them for the field-based experience.  Following their return, students produce and publicly present work (creative or scholarly) based on their field experience and additional research or work.  This course may be repeated for credit provided that the sites differ.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    LST 203 - Interpreting Built Environments


    From Zen temple gardens to Versailles to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the way we design our external environments has revealed who we are as societies and nations. Changing ideals of landscape and building design from one tradition to another, from one period to another, form part of the history of ideas. But workaday landscapes, too, (our hometowns, malls, college campuses, office towers, highways and big box stores) have cultural meanings, and the course encourages students to study closely this more familiar world as well. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 210 - Gender and Science


    What does it mean to be a scientist? How does gender complicate the way that we think about science? What effect has history had on access to education, and access to the practice of science? These are the issues students will contemplate as they explore the relationship of science, gender and cultures. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 255 - Beauty, Infinity and Knowledge


    An interdisciplinary examination of the origins of Western science.  By investigating Renaissance and early modern transformations in art, religion, and philosophy, students trace the emergence of the modern secular and scientific worldview in such thinkers as Meister Eckhart, Nicolas of Cusa, Copernicus, and Galileo.  The course also examines scientific method as evident in famous experiments.  The investigation is guided throughout by interrelations between aesthetic categories of beauty and elegance on the one hand and scientific structures of rigorous experimentation on the other. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 276 - Introduction to Film Theory and History (Offered in Spain)


    An introduction to the history and theory of film from the birth of the industry through the contemporary period. Themes include: the nexus of art and industry, film language and plot development, film as a product and reflection of culture, and technology. Exemplars of Western (American and European) and non-Western (Asian and Latin American) cinema are screened as the basis of classroom discussion. Taught in English.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 302 - Methods of Inquiry in the Humanities


    An in-depth exploration of humanities-based research methods, this course prepares humanities majors for Senior Thesis I and II. The course addresses contemporary modes of inquiry, including the role that race, class, gender, and nation play in interpretation and analysis. Other methods examined include: textual analysis, phenomenology, archival historical research, oral history, and ethnography. The process of discovering a senior thesis topic, writing a literature review, and selecting methodologies are integral to the class. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior class status in English, history, liberal studies, or international studies majors or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 308 - Contemporary Issues


    Examination and analysis of the critical issues and events of our contemporary world. The issues are approached through lecture, readings in current literature, the news media and classroom discussion. Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as the course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 350 - Male Images in Story and Film


    In exploring images of the male in film and story, this course studies: the dynamics giving rise to these images, the truths and stereotypes underlying them, and the social, economic, political, and global interests and issues emanating from them.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    LST 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    LST 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    LST 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to liberal sudies in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Liberal Studies/Education - Go to the School of Education below

    Mathematics

  •  

    MTH 106 - Principles of Mathematics for Educators I


    This first course in mathematics education is designed for prospective elementary school teachers. The focus of the course is the development of the real number system from an informal point of view through the study of sets, relations, and operations using a variety of problem solving strategies. The emphasis is on problem solving and whole number operations because this strand reflects a central role in K-8 mathematics.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 107 - Principles of Mathematics for Educators II


    A mathematics content course in which the emphasis is on developing a conceptual understanding of and strong mathematical skills in the number theory and algebraic thinking strand of mathematics competency for elementary school teachers as defined by the Department of Education in Massachusetts. This course continues coverage of numbers and operations, and builds a strong foundation in algebraic thinking.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 108 - Principles of Mathematics for Educators III


    This third course in mathematics education covers the last two strands of mathematics education: foundations of probability/statistics and geometry/measurement. It rigorously treats these topics by developing a strong foundation in the deep mathematical theory that drives the applications in modern statistics and geometry. Perspectives in the development of mathematics are also presented throughout the course.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 112 - Mathematical Problem Solving


    Develops student problem-solving skills by teaching different problem-solving strategies and allowing students the opportunity to develop and reflect on their own problem-solving and critical thinking skills. The students apply these strategies to real-world scenarios. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    By appropriate math placement only. Cannot be taken by students with credit in any other MTH course.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 126 - Applied Statistics


    Introduces the student to applied statistical methods used in industry and scientific applications. Emphasis is on the practical aspects as students use descriptive and inferential statistics to analyze real data in applications of hypothesis testing, ANOVA, and linear regression and correlation. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 129 - Analysis of Functions (Pre-calculus)


    This course gives students an introduction to graphs and functions.  Specific topics include the Cartesian coordinate system, circles and graphs, functions and graphs, linear and quadratic functions, and trigonometric functions.  A review of the requisite high school algebra is also given. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning General Education requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    High school algebra.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    MTH 134 - Calculus I


    This is a first course in calculus with applied modeling exercises. We begin with a study of limits and continuity, the mean value theorem, the definition of the derivative and techniques of differentiation, including the chain rule. We then focus on the applications of differentiation including: modeling of bodies in motion, exponential growth/decay, mechanics, and related rates. We finish with optimization, the fundamental theorem of calculus, antiderivatives and introductory integrals and their applications. Weekly modeling exercises will be assigned and completed during the fourth hour period. Knowledge of algebra and trigonometry is assumed and passage of an entrance exam is required. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 129 or placement. Cannot be taken by students who have already taken MTH 136.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    MTH 136 - Calculus II


    A continuation of MTH134, this course reviews the fundamental theorem of calculus, antiderivatives, definite integrals and the techniques of differential and integral calculus. Additional concepts covered include integration, and their applications to finding arc lengths, areas, volumes, and density. Applications explored include social, physical and life sciences. The use of integral tables, partial differentiation, the method of least squares, and sequences and series are also studied.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 134.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 205 - The Mathematics of Music


    Students are introduced to the connections between mathematics and music, focusing on the analysis of the mathematical structure of sound, the mathematical models of the theory of the consonance, symmetry in Western music, and computer sound synthesis. Previous knowledge of musical notation is not required, some high school mathematics recommended. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 210 - Mathematical Reasoning


    In this course students learn the tools required to build a solid foundation of rigorous mathematical thinking. The focus is on problem solving in the context of elementary set theory, number theory, and combinatorics. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 225 - Probability


    This is a first course in probability. After exploring the basic axioms of probability, students use combinatorial methods for counting more advanced experiments. Conditional probability, independence, expectation and several discrete random variables are also studied, concluding with Markov Chains and their applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Placement or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 237 - Calculus III


    This course addresses multivariate calculus that includes integration and differentiation in higher dimensions, Greens Theorem, and vector calculus, and provides an introduction to partial differential equations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH136 or equivalent.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 238 - Linear Algebra


    Linear algebra is the branch of algebra in which one studies vector spaces, linear operators and mapping, matrix algebra, system of equations, and linear transformations. The course involves the use of matrices and vectors along with technology to study these concepts in depth. Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Appropriate math placement or permission of instructor.
     

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 330 - Ordinary Differential Equations


    This course examines first order differential equations including basic solution techniques. Second order linear, constant coefficient differential equations, including both the homogeneous and non-homogeneous cases are also covered. Topics include: Lapace transforms; introduction to complex arithmetic, as needed; brief overview of 2x2 matrix algebra, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors; systems of two linear differential equations and applications.

    Prerequisites & Notes
      MTH 136 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 350 - Mathematical Modeling and Numerical Analysis I


    This course is the first of a two course sequence in mathematical modeling and numerical approximation techniques covering topics such as operations research, and models, recurrence relations and induction, interpolation, curve-fitting, numerical differentiation and quadrature problems. Basic programming skills in mathematically based software (MATLAB) is developed to run simulations and numerical solutions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CSC 160, MTH 330.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    MTH 410 - Abstract Algebra


    An introduction to number theory, including groups, rings, and fields, and their applications to questions in elementary and advanced number theory, including an introduction to Galois theory.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 136 or equivalent, MTH 210.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 415 - Topics in Geometry


    This course is an introduction to linear geometry in space and convex 3-polytopes. Topics discussed include coordinates in space, linear/affine/convex combinations, linear systems of inequalities, faces and f-vectors of polytopes, regular/Archimedian solids, 3-dimensional symmetry groups, and planar graphs. Also covered are classical results such as Cauchy’s rigidity theorem, Eberhard’s theorem, Euler’s theorem, Hilbert’s third problem, and Steinitz’ theorem. The theoretical discussions are supplemented with concrete examples and hands-on projects.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 237 or MTH 238.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 431 - Partial Differential Equations


    For dynamical systems with a large number of state variables, their representation via ordinary differential equations becomes unfeasible. This course lays the foundation of partial differential equations (PDEs), which play a central role in physics, acoustics, and thermodynamics. Topics include boundary value problems, Fourier series, the heat equation, vibrations of continuous systems, the potential equation, and spectral methods.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     MTH 330.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 450 - Mathematical Modeling and Numerical Analysis II


    This course is the second in a two course sequence in mathematical modeling and numerical solutions to ordinary and basic partial differential equations, including Newton’s Method, Runge-Kutta, and splines. Programming skills in mathematically based software (MATLAB) developed in part I of the course are expanded on to run more complex simulations.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 350.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 480 - Senior Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission. Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    MTH 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II. Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects. The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MTH 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to applied mathematics in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Military Science and Leadership

  •  

    MSL 101 - Leadership and Personal Development


    Cadets are introduced to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, goal setting, time management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession.

    (Cr: 0)
  •  

    MSL 102 - Introduction to Tactical Leadership


    Overviews leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using affective writing skills. Cadets explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises.

    (Cr: 0)
  •  

    MSL 201 - Innovative Team Leadership


    Cadets explore the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework (trait and behavior theories). Cadets practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs.

    (Cr: 0)
  •  

    MSL 301 - Adaptive Tactical Leadership


    Challenges cadets to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with challenging scenarios related to squad tactial operations. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes and actions. Based on such feedback, as well as their own self-evaluations, cadets continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities.

    (Cr: 0)
  •  

    MSL 302 - Leadership in Changing Environments


    Use of increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build cadet awareness and skills in leading tactical operations up to platoon level. Cadets review aspects of combat, stability, and support operations. They also conduct military briefings and develop proficiency in garrison operation orders.

    (Cr: 0)
  •  

    MSL 401 - Developing Adaptive Leaders


    Cadets develop proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations functioning as a member of a staff and providing performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets. Lessons on military justice and personnel processes prepare cadets to make the transition to Army officers.

    (Cr: 0)
  •  

    MSL 402 - Leadership in a Complex World


    Cadets explore the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the contemporary operating environment (COE). Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of interaction with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support.

    (Cr: 0)
  • Music

  •  

    MUS 105 - Endicott College Chorus


    Participation in a singing ensemble that rehearses weekly, performs works of varied music styles, and focuses on techniques to achieve proper choral sound and musical interpretation. May be repeated up to eight semesters for credit. Only three credits of this course can be applied toward the General Education elective requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    MUS 106 - Private Music Instruction


    Weekly instruction in voice, piano, or other instruments, and acting is provided by special arrangement, and at an additional fee, or participation in a theatrical production with permission of the director. One private lesson per week. Hours arranged with instructor. May be repeated up to eight semesters for credit. Only three credits of this course can be applied toward the General Education elective requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    MUS 110 - Fundamentals of Music


    An introduction to music covering basic musical elements, notation, instruments, form structures, and historical periods, with emphasis on developing listening ability, and exploring the creative and expressive aspects of music. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 111 - History of Western Music


    A survey of the history of music of Western civilization from the third century to the present with emphasis on important composers and evolution of musical style within historical periods. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 113 - Jazz Band


    The course includes mastery of jazz styles and repertoire in a jazz band ensemble. Students develop musicianship skills, including instrumental methods, jazz and improvisation. Participants perform arrangements in a variety of jazz styles, with arrangements by historical and contemporary jazz composers. Biweekly rehearsals culminate in performances. The ensemble rehearses a minimum of two times per week in addition to scheduled class time and is coached by a faculty member. The faculty member establishes the number of performances when the group is formed. May be repeated up to eight semesters for credit. Only three credits of this course can be applied toward the General Education elective requirement.  

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    MUS 114 - Chamber Ensemble


    The course includes maturity of classical styles and repertoire in the structure of a chamber ensemble. Duos, trios, quartets, and quintets are formed depending on available players. Students develop musicianship skills, including instrumental methods and small group recital expertise. Participants perform arrangements in a variety of classical styles, by historical and contemporary composers. Biweekly rehearsals culminate in performances. The ensembles rehearse a minimum of two times per week in addition to scheduled class times and is coached by a faculty member. The faculty member establishes the number of performances when the group is formed. May be repeated up to eight semesters for credit. Only three credits of this course can be applied toward the General Education elective requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    MUS 115 - Modern Band Project


    A performance course wherein students learn to play various rock and roll styles. Emphasis upon characteristics of style to produce quality performances with professional sounding lead vocals, background vocals, instrumental solos, and arrangements. Students perform on campus. The course produces more than one band, depending on enrollment numbers. Entrance to this class is based upon passing an audition.  May be repeated for up to eight semesters for credit. Only three credits of this course can be applied toward the General Education elective requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Vocal or instrumental proficiency; students must audition to take this course.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    MUS 116 - Pep Band


    This course provides experience performing in a band with emphasis on instrumental music. Students learn to play popular tunes of today and yesterday in support of athletic and other College events, and participate in opportunities to celebrate and advance the Endicott College name and the reputation of this ensemble.  May be repeated up to eight semesters for credit. Only three credits of this course can be applied toward the General Education elective requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    MUS 120 - Guitar I


    The course fosters a historical understanding and basic playing skills of this versatile instrument through a classroom-studio approach. Several aspects of the guitar are addressed including the history of the guitar; listening to classical, jazz, and rock guitar masters; reading music (not tab) to play introductory single note melodies; and learning basic chords, picking and strumming techniques. Students practice weekly assignments, play alone and in duets.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     

     

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    MUS 160 - Performance Workshop


    Students study and practice several important facets of performance giving Special attention to music preparation, interpretation, soloing, stage presence, and performance anxiety. The course includes a series of exercises Related to preparing music for performance, interpretation, and memorization. Students work to learn music, prepare solos, critique and study stage presence, perform exercises, and give in-class performances. “Leading” and “directing” a small ensemble toward achieving a particular musical conception is also addressed.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 180 - Improvisation


    Students learn and practice melodic and harmonic approaches to improvisation, focusing on development of technical skills. The course utilizes a studio performance methodology in which participants learn to design, implement, and practice improvisations. Studio work is complemented with analysis of works from various cultures. No prior experience in improvisation is needed, while experienced players increase skill levels.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Basic proficiency in music reading, playing an instrument or singing.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 201 - Music Theory I


    A study of the structural aspects of music and their function, including intervals, scales, chords, key signatures, non-harmonic tones, harmonic analysis, and simple form structures.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MUS 110 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 216 - Songwriting I


    Students practice the craft of song writing; develop their creativity and musical knowledge of melody, harmony, rhythm, and form. Writing lyrics is given special attention. The role lyrics play in defining mood and their relationship to melody and harmony is also discussed.  Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    The ability to play and understand chords on guitar or piano; students with any questions about their ability should contact the instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 220 - Studio Audio Production I


    This course covers the basics of audio production in a controlled studio environment. The emphasis is on learning the fundamental practices and operations of a recording studio emphasizing the role of the studio engineer.

  •  

    MUS 221 - Studio Audio Production II


    This course builds on the practices and techniques examined in Studio Audio Production I. The emphasis is on further managing the practices and operations of recording studios. Students develop skills as a studio engineer with emphasis on recording acoustic and electric instruments, live performance, and advanced digital audio workstation (DAW) operation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MUS 220 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 230 - Jazz Styles


    A study of the roots of jazz music in America, the major characteristics of the genre, and the historical developments that led to the jazz movement of the 1920’s. The impact of jazz on contemporary music is also explored. The class has an experiential component enabling students to integrate jazz principles with practice.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 240 - The Rise of Rock and Roll


    Critically examines rock and roll through case studies that illuminate important trends in the development and evolution of rock and roll as the dominant form of musical environment in the mid to late twentieth century.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 244 - Music Rebels


    This course studies rebel musicians, their musical innovations and idiosyncrasies. How does a musician expand contemporary practices and influence future musical styles? By examining the pertinent facets of culture that play a role in the manifestations of creativity, this course contextualizes these rebel musicians and their work.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 250 - Ideologies of Music, Art, and Literature


    This interdisciplinary arts course investigates topics in theology, psychology, Romantic conceptions of nature, and other concepts within the discipline of humanities. The multi-layered nature of the arts, in regard to these topics, is revealed through close readings of specific musical compositions, paintings, sculpture, literary texts, writings by artists, philosophers, and cultural theorists, and theater productions from various periods in history and regions of the world.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Sophomore class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 260 - Piano Styles


    Students learn about the birth of the piano, composers, pianists, and piano music from a variety of musical styles including classical, jazz, boogie, ragtime, and blues. Students become familiar with piano music and attributes of musical styles that define landmark moments in the evolution of music. Examples of piano music serve as a vehicle that illuminates the aesthetic complexity of the instrument, traits of music history and musical styles. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    MUS 316 - Songwriting II


    This course addresses advanced concepts of music writing to develop personal musical identity. Students are encouraged to break away from conventional song forms. They explore advanced harmony, modulation, extended forms, developing melodic ideas, and instrumental arranging. Developing lyrics and figurative language is also part of this course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MUS 216 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Nursing

  •  

    NU 020 - Nursing Test Preparation Lab


    This course is a test preparation program that focuses on critical thinking and problem solving skills needed by professional nurses. Over the course of a semester, the bi-weekly meetings assist students to become emotionally, didactically and technically prepared for computerized NCLEX style examinations. Students have the opportunity to review and develop test-taking strategies, and study the content areas covered in the NCLEX- RN exam. Required of all students in nursing the pre-licensure program. 

    (Cr: 0)
  •  

    NU 210 - Fundamentals of Nursing


    The role of the professional nurse is analyzed focusing on current nursing practice. The nursing process is the organizing framework for planning, delivering, and evaluating nursing care. Concepts of wellness, health promotion, and safety are explored for adult and older adult clients. Discussion of alternative options to achieve client goals is encouraged in class and clinical to further develop critical thinking skills. Students develop psychomotor skills in guided nursing laboratory sessions. Clinical experiences are offered in long-term care settings in the community.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 201, BIO 202. Corequisite: NU 230. Open to nursing majors only.

    (Cr: 8)
  •  

    NU 211 - Care of Adults


    Focuses on the care of individuals/families requiring medical or surgical treatment. Uses all components of the nursing process as an organizing focus in the delivery and evaluation of nursing care aimed at restoring and maintaining the patient’s optimal state of health with increasing degrees of skill. Includes mathematical computational skills and basic computer instruction related to the delivery of nursing care. Provides supervised learning experiences in the nursing skills laboratory and acute care clinical settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 210. Corequisite: NU 307.

    (Cr: 8)
  •  

    NU 230 - Health Assessment


    Students use interviewing skills while collecting complete and focused health histories. The physical examination skills of inspection, palpation, percussion, auscultation, and selected measurement techniques are used to assess major body systems of clients across the age continuum. The analysis of data using functional health patterns, clinical assessment tools, diagnostic reasoning, and critical thinking skills enhance the student’s ability to define and describe a client’s current state of health including recognition of selected deviations from normal. Students practice assessment skills covered in class lecture in nursing laboratory.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 201, BIO 202, or RN status. Corequisite: NU 210.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    NU 305 - RN Role Transition


    The transition course for registered nurses provides the foundation for synthesis of prior learning with baccalaureate educational preparation for nursing. Critical thinking, decision making, and interpersonal communication is emphasized. Identification of personal learning goals and professional role development are incorporated. Learning experiences enhance the student’s transition into the baccalaureate role.  Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Licensure as an RN in Massachusetts.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    NU 306 - Nursing Research


    This course introduces the nursing student to the importance of research to the discipline of nursing. The course focuses on the research process in the discovery of knowledge and the relevance of research outcomes to nursing practice. Nursing students enhance their critical thinking skills while critiquing current research. The capabilities of baccalaureate prepared nurses as participants on research teams and as consumers of research are examined.  Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Prerequisites or corequisites: MTH 125, MTH 126, NU 211.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    NU 307 - Pharmacology


    Addresses basic pharmacologic concepts as they relate to nursing practice. Core concepts in pharmacology including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are studied. Pharmacologic treatment modalities of illness are linked with the nursing process and the pathophysiological processes covered in BIO 335.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    BIO 201, BIO 202, NU 230.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    NU 311 - Psychosocial Nursing


    Emphasizes the psychosocial assessment and care of patients who have medical or mental health disorders. Students evaluate the Psychosocial needs of diverse populations and participate in interventions involving individuals, families, and groups. The Psychosocial response to impairment is explored with patients of differing cultural backgrounds, functional abilities, mental status, patterns of behavior, and developmental levels. The interpersonal process of professional nursing is examined in relation to communication and critical thinking. Clinical experience is provided in selected hospital and community settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 211.

    (Cr: 8)
  •  

    NU 313 - Care of Childbearing Families


    Basic knowledge and skills underlying the care of families during childbearing are presented. Students develop beginning skills in applying the nursing process to the care of families during pregnancy, birthing, recovery, and transition home. Nursing students are expected to exercise critical thinking during clinical decision making, use therapeutic communication skills, and provide therapeutic nursing interventions in selected facilities and community settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 210, NU 211, NU 230, NU 307.

    (Cr: 5)
  •  

    NU 314 - Care of Children


    Students build on previous knowledge of growth, development, and pathophysiology to assess, plan, and implement safe and developmentally appropriate nursing interventions to children from birth through adolescence. Rich clinical experiences in both hospital-based and community settings provide opportunities to strengthen communication skills with children and families from diverse backgrounds. Classroom analysis of specific case studies encourages peer review as a method to stimulate critical thinking.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 210, NU 211, NU 230, NU 307.

    (Cr: 5)
  •  

    NU 315 - Intercultural Nursing: Service Learning Experience


    Incorporates the concepts of partnership building, risk reduction, and health promotion in communities. Students actively explore international health issues specific to the select country they are visiting and gain a better understanding of the nurses role in delivery of care and the environmental, economic, socio-cultural and political factors that influence health in a developing nation. Students participate in a service learning experience in partnership with an international community-based organization to assess health risk factors and plan health promoting activities specific to identified health issues. Students gain an understanding of physical assessment, risk assessment, unique health needs, problem posing and formulation of solutions as part of their coursework. Service also consists of help with construction projects in the community.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 210, NU 211, NU 230, NU 307 and junior or senior class status. Beginning foreign language skills helpful.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    NU 320 - Holistic and Complementary Approaches to Health Care


    Provides the foundation for knowledge of the basic principles and differences between Western (allopathic) and Eastern (traditional) health care. Examines the differences and similarities of the various forms of traditional healing methods and analyzes current health practices and future trends. Students keep a journal to document their development through the course focusing on their growth experiences in mind, body, spirit, and social interconnectedness. The course introduces the five core values of holistic health: 1) holistic philosophy, theories, and ethics (relationship centered care), 2) holistic caring process, 3) holistic communication, therapeutic environment, and cultural diversity, 4) holistic education and research, and 5) holistic nurse self-care. Students practice skills and develop an understanding of complementary alternative medicine therapies (CAM).

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    NU 400 - Nursing Internship and Seminar


    This internship is a precepted clinical experience designed to facilitate the transition from nursing student to entry level baccalaureate practitioner. Students work with a baccalaureate prepared RN in a medical-surgical, maternity, pediatric, psychosocial or acute care setting providing therapeutic nursing interventions for multiple clients.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 410.

    (Cr: 5)
  •  

    NU 408 - Leadership and Management in Nursing


    Principles of leadership and management are applied to case studies that illustrate the skills needed to manage patient care and human or material resources in the health care field. Students explore strategies for exercising power to influence the politics of the work setting, professional organizations, and legislatures. Major factors in the escalation of health care costs are explored as well as the legal and ethical implications of current social policies.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    NU 410 - Acute Care Nursing


    This course builds on content taught in prior nursing courses. Emphasis is placed on the application of the nursing process in providing therapeutic nursing interventions to adults with complex health problems: acute illness, multi-system disease, and trauma. Content includes the use of equipment, technology, procedures, and pharmacological agents commonly used in the treatment of complex health problems. The nurse’s role in providing and managing care for clients with complex alterations in health in hospital settings is addressed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status.

    (Cr: 8)
  •  

    NU 411 - Community Health Nursing


    This course focuses on fostering health in the community. Cultural, socioeconomic, and epidemiological factors are considered as community specific health problems are identified. Empowering individuals, families, and groups to restore and maintain health as well as prevent illness and injury is an integral component of this course. Clinical learning experiences are provided in a variety of community and public health settings.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    NU 410, senior class status.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    NU 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    NU 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to nursing in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Performing Arts

  •  

    DAN 100 - Introduction to Dance


    This studio course provides the instruction of multiple genres of dance including; ballet, modern, tap, jazz, musical theater, and social dance at a beginner level. Every student’s ability is assessed and training follows a curriculum designed to maximize his or her potential. The course addresses basic vocabulary and techniques, self-discipline, critical thinking, and confidence building. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes



    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    DAN 103 - Modern Dance Techniques


    Through the study of several modern dance techniques, this studio course fosters strong technique, expanded range of motion, and efficiency of movement. Warm-ups and center movement phrases include elements of Graham, Limon, O’Donnell and Horton techniques to develop coordination, strength and flexibility. Somatic practices, such as the Bartenieff Fundamentals, yoga, and developmental movement patterns, are studied to promote body awareness and alignment. Theoretical underpinnings of the techniques and the biographies of the choreographers are discussed. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    DAN 105 - Repertory Dance Ensemble


    This course provides an opportunity for participation in a dance ensemble. Students develop technique, versatility, and adaptation to style within the field of jazz dance and contemporary/modern movement. Students are required to participate in public performances as designated by the faculty.  May be repeated for up to eight semesters for credit. Only three credits of this course can be applied toward the General Education elective requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    DAN 120 - Ballet Techniques


    The course prepares beginner to advanced beginner students with the foundation necessary for progression to the intermediate and advanced levels. Every student’s ability is assessed, and training follows a curriculum designed for each student to progress to his or her maximum potential.  Course includes classical ballet vocabulary, technique, self -discipline, motivation, creativity, critical thinking, and confidence building. Students are required to participate in public performances as designated by the faculty. Instruction is provided by faculty from the Boston Ballet School in special arrangement with Endicott College. May be repeated for up to eight semesters for credit.  Only three credits of this course can be applied toward the General Education elective requirement.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    DAN 200 - Dance Composition (Choreography)


    This course develops the student’s artistic ability to choreograph dance works in relation to self, others, time, space, reason, and other aspects. The class enhances students’ communication, organizational, and reasoning skills through kinesthetic and intellectual exploration of the relationship of dance to other forms of art and communication. This course incorporates group improvisations, creating and performing, discussion, critical analysis, and journal writing.  Students additionally study the works of well-known choreographers throughout the semester.  Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DAN 104 or DAN 105.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DAN 220 - Ballet Techniques II


    This course provides the instruction of ballet technique at the intermediate and advanced levels.  Every student’s ability is assessed and training follows a curriculum designed for each student to progress to his or her maximum potential. Course addresses classical ballet vocabulary, technique, self-discipline, motivation, creativity, critical thinking, and confidence building. Instruction is provided by faculty from the Boston Ballet School with classes twice weekly, on campus and at Boston Ballet studios in Marblehead.  Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DAN 120 or equivalent dance training.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    DAN 225 - Dance History


    This course examines the history of dance, with an emphasis on Western theatrical dance including ballet, modern, and jazz/musical theater. From examples of ritualistic dance to concert dance, this course studies artists and the cultural phenomena important to the development of contemporary dance in the United States. Students also look at dance as an expression of human culture and analyze the key developments in dance as they relate to social, political, and historical change. Considerations of race, gender, age, and physical ability are included. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DAN 230 - Contemporary Jazz Techniques


    This studio course provides the instruction of contemporary jazz dance. It addresses technique in the genre, and in improvisation and style. Influential contemporary jazz dancers and choreographers of the 20th and 21st centuries are studied. Students learn intricate and fast-paced center work and movement sequences. Every student’s ability is assessed and training follows a curriculum to nurture his or her potential. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DAN 103, DAN 104 or DAN 120.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    DAN 235 - Mind and Body Awareness


    This course is designed to increase mind/body awareness; improve posture, inner balance, and strength; educate awareness of injury prevention; and demonstrate techniques for relief from pain and tension to be applied when performing. The course also provides students the means for understanding health and wellness of the performer, athlete, or student.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DAN 240 - World Dance Cultures


    This course investigates and compares several dance traditions from around the world. From bharata natyam to flamenco, capoeira to b-boying, students learn the many roles dance can play in society including religious devotion, healing, political resistance, community bonding and “high art.” Students discover how cultural beliefs about gender, politics, economics, family and the arts are embedded in dance practices. The way dance practices along the African diaspora and other historic migration routes display the cross-cultural transmission of ideas is also explored. Students begin to understand how movement creates and communicates cultural meanings. Each class contains both analysis and movement practice. No dance experience is required. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DAN 300 - Dance Composition II


    In this course, students develop their skills with the essential elements of choreography - space, shape, time, and energy - by creating original group dances with their peers. Partnering, group spatial relationships, and different choreographic structures are explored in-depth. Students develop their own personal movement style and research a topic, then communicate their thoughts on the theme through making a dance. A culminating performance features students performing in their own and others’ work.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DAN 200.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    DAN 305 - Dance Teaching Methods


    This course is designed for both aspiring dancers and dance educators. Teaching methods for ages 3 through 18 in ballet, creative movement, jazz, modern, social dance, and tap dance are covered for school and/or private settings. Students use their creativity to develop lesson plans while incorporating important standards of movement, and somatic practices that are learned in the course. Students practice teaching by implementing their lesson plans with peers.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    DAN 103, DAN 120, or DAN 230, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PA 100 - Introduction to Performing Arts


    Devoted to the exploration of music, theater, and dance, this course explores interdisciplinary attributes, expressive qualities of ideas and emotions, and ways these art forms persuade and make statements. The course also explores technical elements of the performing arts, their structure and form as they contribute to meaning, and defines professional terminology related to style. Students participate in interpretation and discuss artistic examples in class.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PA 200 - Aesthetics in the Performing Arts


    Introduces students to a wide range of aesthetics topics inherent to the performing arts including an analysis and discussion of dance, theater and music performances. The course explores paradigms of beauty, creativity, and imagination; definitions of art and their sources of origin; taste; subjectivity and judgment; social mores; nature; mimesis; and form. Readings include theoretical articles, philosophical excerpts, and case studies on a range of topics such as classicism, authenticity, and censorship. Readings are scrutinized and ideas applied to performances with informed discussion and analysis. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PA 300 - Performance Workshop I


    This studio course provides students with a laboratory to explore aspects of performance, creation and collaboration in an interdisciplinary setting. Drawing from music, dance, theater and visual arts traditions, students express their ideas through the practice of improvisation and/or the interpretation of composed works. The psychology and inner states of building stage presence, including overcoming performance anxiety, are also integrated into the course.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PA 305 - Performance Workshop II


    As a continuation of Performance Workshop I, this course provides students with the opportunity to put into practice the interpretive and improvisational tools developed in PA3XX. As members of small, collaborative, cross-disciplinary groups, students work towards creating, producing and performing an original piece of art. The vast potential of interdisciplinary performance is investigated.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PA 300.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PA 310 - Audition and Portfolio


    This course prepares students for post graduate experiences including auditions, resume/bio development, portfolio displays, interviews, recordings, and video documentation. Students prepare work that represents their “artistic voice” in music, dance, and/or theater. Students take part in mock auditions and interviews, and they provide information that best represents themselves in the field they choose to pursue, in front of a jury. Learning how to research opportunities for employment is covered, and students receive feedback from working professionals.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Philosophy

  •  

    PHL 100 - Introduction to Philosophy


    A survey of philosophical thought from pre- Socratic times to the present. Attention is directed toward the nature of reality, theories of knowledge, ethics, religion, and politics. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHL 104 - Ethics


    What is a good life? What factors should shape the ethical decisions we make? And how do ethics relate to artistic, intellectual, and social aspects of our lives? This course studies and debates classical and modern ethical theories, through philosophical and literary texts. It then brings these theories into conversation with a range of contemporary ethical issues, from punishment to medical ethics to the environment. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHL 217 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy


    An exploration of the central debates, texts, and developments in philosophy in the ancient (Greco-Roman) and medieval periods, drawing on Hellenistic texts as well as some religious thought from Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Issues to be considered are: 1) What is the nature of the world and its relation to divinity (metaphysics/philosophical theology)? 2) What is the best form of political life for humanity? and 3) What should human beings seek and do, in order to live a fully flourishing life? Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHL 220 - Ideas, Culture, and Social Thought


    Examination and analysis of the notion of culture as it is defined in complex contexts in which power relations, economic and political interests, and ideological practices play a crucial role. Special emphasis is placed on the distinction between ideas and ideologies, the critique of the persistence of myths in modern rationalizations of social practices, and the consideration of the notion of the self as a socially constructed entity. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHL 100 or PHL 104 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHL 230 - Philosophy and the Arts


    Philosophy engages art in a variety of ways: through general questioning of the meanings of beauty and artistic creation, through historical analysis and critique of artistic traditions, and through direct engagement with specific artworks. This course examines works in multiple artistic media including literature, film, painting, and music through the lens of philosophical inquiry drawing upon classical, modern, and contemporary philosophical sources. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHL 240 - Contemporary Philosophy


    Analysis of the evolution of contemporary ideas as they follow, or break with, classical thinking about history, philosophy and subjectivity, art and politics. The critique of traditional philosophies of history as a linear process, of assumed ideas about the avant-garde in art, and the exploration of the relation between culture and politics constitute the main focus of the course. A variety of texts from contemporary authors (Jameson, Lyotard, Baudrillard, Said, among others) are read and discussed in class debates. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHL 100 or PHL 104 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHL 245 - Modern Philosophy


    Surveys Western philosophy from the early 17th century enlightenment through 19th century critiques of rationalism. Readings nclude selections from major thinkers who have shaped modern conceptions of the self, society, the natural cosmos, and religion. The course addresses philosophical themes such as the dialectic of freedom and nature, the status of political order, and the role of reason in human life. Throughout the course, reference is made to the European cultural, historical, and political contexts in which these modern ideas first arose and circulated. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One previous philosophy course or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHL 310 - Bioethics


    Bioethics provides students an opportunity to explore controversial political, legal, and moral issues that arise from objectives and methods of medical and biotechnological disciplines. The course includes an overview of ethical principles and theories relevant to these issues, which include healthcare, physician-assisted suicide, genetic engineering, and reproductive technologies among others.  Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHL 332 - Religion and Its Critics: Studies in Philosophy of Religion


    How intelligent is “intelligent design”? Is belief in God rational? Is it moral? Or, is religion a way of life that creates hostility and destroys our ability to be human? How can religion address the problems of evil and innocent suffering? This discussion-intensive course explores several of the most influential philosophical criticisms of religion, along with a range of defenses of religious belief and practice, through philosophical and literary texts. The course surveys premodern, modern, and postmodern texts from the Jewish, Christian, and philosophical traditions. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHL 100, PHL 104 or REL 104.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Photography

  •  

    PHT 116 - Introduction to Photographic Imaging


    This course introduces the fundamentals of photographic imaging, including; camera controls, exposure, optics, which are the basis of image capture. Through imaging assignments, critiques, readings and writing assignments, the students are introduced to the principals of photographic language, including image construction and composition as well as the use of images with regard to subject matter and context. Satisfies Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHT 202 - Studio Photography I


    This course introduces fundamental methods and concepts for creating photographic lighting, as well as the use of the studio as a context for creation and expression. The use of studio lights and the methods of lighting are applied to subjects and assignments found in commercial and fine art practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 216 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHT 216 - Photographic Imaging II


    This second course in the photography sequence extends basic concepts introduced in PHT 116. Technical aspects of image capture and image processing are explored further
    developing a student’s understanding of image formation and production. The vocabulary of imaging making and concepts of image use is explored for the purpose of creating images that
    are effective as vehicles of expression, documentation, and communication and can be applied to all sectors of photographic practice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 116 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHT 218 - Documentary Photography


    This is a hands-on, image making course in which the students reveal and communicate something of importance of the places and people they encounter. The potential use for private, exhibited, and published use of the images directs the shooting assignments.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 216 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHT 260 - Digital Imaging and Manipulation


    This studio course explores editing, alteration and the construction of photographic imagery. Students learn digital methods and techniques for the alteration and construction of imagery that range from basic retouching to complex compositing. Concepts concerning the construction of photographic pictorial space, visual language and photographic iconography are explored as a dimension of working with imagery.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 116, GD 203, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHT 306 - Experimental and Alternative Media Photography


    This course explores the creation of images through the use of traditional, alternative and digital cameras. Alterative, digital, and combined media types are explored in the pursuit of new expressive forms of imagery.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 216 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHT 312 - Advanced Photographic Methods


    This advanced studio course provides an intensive exploration of exposure control and digital output. Projects involve specific materials testing, printing methodology and the exploration of formal photographic approaches in relation specific subject matter. Students will produce a final photographic portfolio.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 202 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHT 325 - Advanced Photography Seminar


    Provides advanced photography students an opportunity to develop greater meaning and direction in their photography. The experience begins with an examination of images and why we make them, and expands into a visual exploration of media and expression. Coursework and a major project culminate in a final examination and exhibition.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 202 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHT 411 - Professional Practice in Photography


    This course provides an overview of professional practice by requiring students to produce photographs for portrait, wedding, public relations, journalism, editorial and commercial commissions. In addition to image production, students apply best practices for bidding, contracts, licensing, production and delivery of images.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PHT 202 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHT 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment. The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors. A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed or the school dean must grant permission. Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    PHT 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II. Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects. The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PHT 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to photography in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Physical Science

  •  

    PHY 107/107L - Physics I and Lab


    A problem-solving approach to fundamental theories and experimental results in elementary physics. Calculus is introduced, but is not a prerequisite. Topics include metric systems of measurement, Newtonian mechanics, and heat and sound waves. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Two years high school algebra or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    PHY 108/108L - Physics II and Lab


    The approach and format of this course are the same as in Physics I. Specific topics covered in this semester are electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and molecular/atomic/nuclear structure. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    PHY 109/109L - Fundamentals of Astronomy I and Lab


    A comprehensive approach to past and current astronomy. Astronomy I covers early astronomy; the distribution, properties, and structure of stars and their life cycles; and our galaxy. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One year high school algebra or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    PHY 110/110L - Fundamentals of Astronomy II and Lab


    The approach and format of this course are the same as in Astronomy I. Specific topics included in Astronomy II are the solar system, current space exploration, and other galaxies. PHY 109 and PHY 110 may be taken in either order of sequence. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. (Lecture 3 cr.; Lab 1 cr.) Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One year high school algebra or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    PHY 116/116L - Nature of the Universe and Lab


    An integrated approach to understanding the principles and organization of the universe. A presentation of basic principles and applications of physics, chemistry, astronomy, and cosmology as they relate to the universe and real world. Basic principles from the science disciplines are investigated through the laboratory experience. Class, three hours per week, (3 cr. lecture, 1 cr. lab).  Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Satisfies the Science and Technology General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    PHY 201/201L - Physics with Calculus I and Lab


    A calculus-based, problem-solving approach to elementary physics for scientists and engineers. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, heat and sound waves, motion, forces, energy, and momentum. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week (Lecture: 3 cr.; Lab: 1 cr.) Must be registered for lecture and lab sections.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 134 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  •  

    PHY 202/202L - Physics with Calculus II and Lab


    A calculus-based, problem-solving approach to elementary physics for scientists and engineers. Topics include electricity and magnetism, DC and AC circuits, electromagnetic waves, and optics. Class, three hours; lab, two hours per week. (Lecture 3 cr.; Lab 1 cr.) Must be registered for lecture and lab sections. Success in PHY 201 or equivalent highly recommended.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    MTH 134 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 4)
  • Political Science

  •  

    POL 100 - Introduction to Politics


    This course introduces students to the content, theory, and practice of political science. Using a comparative approach through case studies and a variety of texts (primary, secondary, theoretical, policy, and multimedia) students examine politics as the relations between the individual, society, state, and power. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 110 - World Politics


    Provides a general introduction to processes, issues, and policies in world politics.  The course moves from the city-state politics of Ancient Greece to the current nation-state-based “multipolar” world, examining the origins of war and peace, the relationships between politics and economic life, and the rules and norms of international interaction in the era of globalization. Students make their own assessments of the changing global political order and challenges that the international community faces. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 213 - American Government and Politics


    A synthesis of the theoretical, constitutional, and pragmatic aspects of the United States. Such topics as federalism, constitutional analysis, civil liberties, and contemporary politics are considered. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 240 - American Foreign Policy


    Surveys and critically examines America’s role on the global stage over time with emphasis on the post-World War II era. Students study specific policies and military and security commitments as reflections of United States strategic, political, and economic interests, but also how such policies and commitments affect the regions and nations they target. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 250 - Political Theory


    Drawing on the most important classical and contemporary political philosophers, this course surveys the central themes of political thought: power and legitimacy; authority and dissent; liberty and quality; sovereignty and responsibility; justice and right; individual, national, and minority identity. This course also examines the relevance and application of these ideas to contemporary issues. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

     

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    POL 260 - Identity Politics


    In an era of resurgent nationalism, fundamentalism, and a purported “clash of civilizations,” identity has supplanted ideology as the organizing political principle of the 21st century.  Using both primary and secondary literature, fiction, and nonfiction, and a variety of media, this course examines the politics of American identities from the construction of a postcolonial nationalist agenda through the identity politics of  the civil rights movements to a critical reassessment of American identity in the 21st century. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 300 - Contemporary Issues in Politics


    This course examines current issues in politics, investigating selected subjects with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field. The specific content, theories, approaches, and assignments depend upon the topic being considered. Possible topics may include: elections; constitutional issues; war and foreign policy; state and local issues; specific legislation, policies (i.e. Patriot Act); etc. Students may take more than one section of this course as long as the course content is new.

     

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 315 - American Political Thought


    Explores the historical evolution of American political ideas through examination of core values and recurring controversies. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 320 - Comparative Political Models


    Using case studies and comparative analysis, this course examines political institutions and processes worldwide. Historical, socioeconomic, and ideological factors are considered in the development of various political systems, their interactions and transformations. The role of regional and global institutions and social movements and their effect on the sovereignty of the nation-state are also considered. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 322 - Chinese Politics and Government


    This course covers the evolution of the Chinese political system in the era of modernization and globalization, focusing on the role of state-building traditions, the formation of authoritarian party-state governance, and the impact of market reforms on China’s political life.  Special emphasis is placed on China’s political process, the rise of a civil society, and the prospects for political reforms.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 325 - Music and the State


    A comparative analysis of issues raised by the state’s role in the production and distribution of music as well as the political and social uses and consequences of music including censorship, artistic freedom, ideological domination, economic development, and marketplace regulation. The focus is on popular music forms such as rock, rap, reggae, and country. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
     

     

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    POL 343 - Constitutional Law


     A study of the United States Supreme Court in the American political system viewed historically and through the analysis of leading cases from the Court’s inception to the present. The course examines the Court’s power and jurisdiction, the relationship among the Supreme Court, Congress, and the Executive branch under the Constitution, and the Court’s interpretation of the separation of power between the federal and state governments.  The course also examines the First Amendment rights of free speech and freedom of religion and some of the leading cases interpreting these rights.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    POL 100 or POL 213 or approval of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    POL 382 - Environmental Law and Politics


    This course examines the major national and international policies and laws protecting the environment, and the groups that impact the implementation and enforcement of these policies and laws.  The social, political, and historical context of the development of environmental policy and laws are explored, along with the penalties for the entities and individuals in violation of these policies and laws. Satisfies the Global Issues General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 430 - Human Rights


    The history, theory, and defense of human rights from their articulation in the 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration to the present are the focus of this course. In-depth case studies of human rights violations around the world provide the basis for examining the legal and philosophical basis for human rights, as well as the function of both political and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in their implementation and defense. The practical aspects of the topic are stressed through guest lectures, site visits, teleconferencing, and direct action/service learning.  Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    POL 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    CJ 302 or PSY 240, PSy 241, senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    POL 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to political science in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SST 100 - Introduction to Contemporary U.S. Security Studies


    A study of the historical forces that changed national security strategy, policy, and organizational response since September 11, 2001. This course examines national security policy and its interrelationship to homeland security strategy.   
     

    (Cr: 3)
  • Psychology

  •  

    PSY 100 - General Psychology


    A survey of the biological and philosophical theories that form the foundation for understanding human behavior including the brain and nervous system, sensation and perception, motivation, learning, developmental issues, personality theories, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, and social psychology.  Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 110 - Lifespan Development


    A basis for understanding physiological, behavioral, and psychological development from conception to senescence. Examination of theory and research pertaining to personality and social, cognitive, sexual, moral, and physical development. Cannot be taken by students who have taken PSY 200 or PSY 203. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 200 - Child and Adolescent Psychology


    A basis for understanding behavioral and psychological development of the child from conception through adolescence. Examines theory and research pertaining to personality and social and cognitive development including the impact of multiculturalism and gender.  Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 203 - Adulthood and Aging


    Focus on the various biological, psychological, and sociological changes associated with the aging process within the framework of the developmental tasks of early adulthood through the middle and later years of life. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 204 - Child Growth and Development


    This course covers child development from prenatal to age six. The course examines major child development theories, states of growth, and interrelated aspects of physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and language development. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Cannot be taken by students who have taken PSY 200.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 220 - Psychological Perspectives


    The classic writings within the field of psychology are studied. This course promotes an in depth appreciation of the major schools of Psychology and how they impact our understanding of self and others. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 240 - Research Methods


    Methods and techniques of research in psychology and related fields are the focus of this course. Emphasis is given to the development of empirical questions from theory, research design and control, construction of survey instruments, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100, HMS 100 or CJ 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 241 - Statistical Methods in the Social Sciences


    Students analyze research data from contemporary studies in the fields of psychology, medicine, and other social sciences using the computer software program Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS).  They also apply their understanding to the critical analysis and interpretation of SPSS generated data.  Topics include: descriptive statistics (e.g. measures of central tendency and variability), and parametric and non-parametric inferential statistics (e.g., correlation, simple linear and multiple regression, t-tests, one-way and factorial ANOVA and ANCOVA, and Chi-square tests of independence and goodness of fit).

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100, HMS 100 or CJ 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 304 - Psychology of Gender


    Examination of the major psychological theories about human behavior as they have been traditionally understood, and as they have been reinterpreted as a result of research on male and female development. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 305 - Social Psychology


    A scientific investigation into how social factors influence the individual’s personality, attitudes, and behavior. The theory, methods, and application of current research on topics such as aggression, prejudice, conformity, leadership, and group dynamics are analyzed. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 307 - Cultural Psychology


    This course examines culture as process. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of culture in various contexts. Particular attention is paid to the relationship of oppression to the formation of cultural identity. Paradigms from black, Asian, and indigenous psychology are included from a developmental perspective.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Six credits in psychology.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 310 - Abnormal Psychology


    Investigation of the causation, development, and treatment of psychological disorders from major theoretical perspectives. Current psychiatric classification is used to examine such topics as schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and other forms of psychosocial deviance. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 317 - Criminal Profiling and Threat Assessment


    This course focuses on the theory, empirical foundations, and practice of Criminal Profiling (the analysis of offense characteristics to determine the distinctive characteristics of the probable offender) and threat assessment (the analysis of a subject’s conduct, psychological functioning, and the context of the alleged threat to determine the risk of targeted violence). These issues are addressed using a multidisciplinary, contextual approach, drawing on theory and research from psychology, law, sociology, and criminal justice.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One of (PSY 100, SOC 101, POL 100, HMS 100, or CJ 100) or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 318 - Forensic Psychology


    This course examines in depth four areas of psychology as these apply to the law and criminal justice. The areas of concentration are psychology and the courtroom, psychology and the criminal, psychology and the victim, and psychology and the law enforcement agent.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 320 - Theories of Personality


    Focus on the nature, theories, and methods of investigation of personality. Major theoretical perspectives are covered, including the psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, interpersonal, and humanistic theories.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 322 - Biological Psychology


    This course explores the fundamental foundations of the neural basis of human behavior. Students examine the anatomy and development of the nervous system, neuronal function, synaptic transmission, psychopharmacology, and sensory systems such as vision and audition.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 323 - Stress and Illness


    How do the psychological stressors of contemporary life affect our health? This course explores the influence of stress and its management on the function of the cardiovascular system, metabolism, development and growth, sex and reproduction, the immune system, pain, memory, and sleep. Also examined is the interaction between the stress response and the incidence and course of psychiatric diseases like depression and anxiety, as well as factors like individual differences in personality, spirituality, and socioeconomic status.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 325 - Human Sexuality


    Cultural and biological aspects of human sexuality with an emphasis on understanding diversity in interpersonal relations. The course also provides opportunities for self-understanding as it relates to one’s sexuality and interpersonal relationships.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100 or BIO 101. Warning: Students should possess a readiness for open and respectful discussion of course themes.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 335 - Theories of Counseling


    This course is designed to give students a solid foundation in the theories and practices of counseling and psychotherapy in current use. Students learn from both a practical and theoretical perspective how the predominant theories in psychology apply in clinical casework along with gaining an understanding of the personal characteristics of effective counselors and psychotherapists and the ethical and multicultural issues they encounter.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    At least six credits in psychology.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 345 - Cognitive Psychology


    This course provides an advanced introduction to human cognition. The research methods and theoretical paradigms central to understanding mental processes are explored. Specifically, students review classic and contemporary views and controversies related to perception, memory, attention, knowledge representations, language, problem solving, and critical thinking.
     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 350 - History and Systems of Psychology


    The underlying tug of war between science and philosophy is the background against which the historical and philosophical antecedents of modern day psychology will be traced. Eastern as well as Western thought are examined in order to fully appreciate the foundations of contemporary systems of psychology such as behaviorism, the psychodynamic, and modern day humanism.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100, PSY 220 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 360 - Psychology of Spirituality


    This course surveys the theory and research in the field of transpersonal psychology that is the interface of psychology and the spiritual disciplines. Students also explore applications with emphasis on meditation, psychotherapy, and ritual. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT 100, INT 200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    PSY 410 - Contemporary Issues in Psychology


    Examines contemporary issues from varied perspectives within the field of psychology. Students investigate selected subjects with an emphasis on the most recent research in the field.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100, junior class status, or permission of instructor. Students may take more than one section of this course as long as the course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 425 - Personal Reflections in Psychology


    This experiential, literature based, constructivist course is designed to offer advanced students an opportunity to reflect on their accumulated learning and continue the process of synthesizing their diverse knowledge experiences into a theoretical and practical world view that will help guide their personal and professional lives. Prerequisites: 12 credits in Psychology.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    12 credits in Psychology.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 435 - Group Therapy: Theory and Practice


    Psychotherapeutic techniques used in small groups and large-group interventions, including reviews of the current research and the legal and ethical issues associated with paraprofessional and professional practice. Students participate in one intensive all-day group experience. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 100, PSY 335.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    PSY 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    PSY 240, PSY 241, senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    PSY 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to psychology in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and a presentation.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Religion

  •  

    REL 104 - World Religions


    A survey of major religious traditions, focusing on beliefs and teachings concerning God, humanity, the world, concepts of salvation, and destiny. The course also explores forms of worship and cultural contribution of the various religions, as well as their influences in the world today. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    REL 245 - Eastern Religions


    An exploration of the histories, central beliefs, and practices of religions originating from India, China, and Japan. The course probes questions of Eastern belief about the ultimate reality, human responsibility, experiences of the sacred, the goal of human life, and reincarnation. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    REL 251 - Religion in American Life


    An introduction to religion in the United States, from Native American religions and European-Indian contact in the Colonial era, to present-day movements and ideas. The course explores a variety of themes in American religious history, such as slavery and religion, politics and religion, evangelicalism, fundamentalism, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam in the United States, “cults” and alternative spiritualities, New Age religions, and religion and popular culture, with an emphasis on the impact of gender, race, and national culture on American spiritual life. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    REL 255 - Western Religious Thought


    Explores the developments and trends of religious thought in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Through a historical survey of some of the most influential authors from these traditions, the course explores the continuity and changes in these communities, and how they have developed in relation to their surrounding cultures and one another. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    REL 270 - Introduction to Islam


    A survey of the beliefs, history, culture, gender issues, and diversity of the Islamic world. The class relies on primary sources (Qur’an, memoirs, autobiographies) to discover the inner meanings of Islam and the Muslim way of life. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Secondary Education Teacher Licensure

  •  

    ED 380 - Methods in the Secondary Content Areas and Field Experience


    This course supports the pre-service teacher in planning for teaching in the secondary school (Grades 5-8; 8-12). The course is interdisciplinary and addresses the skills necessary to become a “best practice” teacher, particularly through addressing principles and standards articulated by the Massachusetts Professional Standards for Teachers and the Coomon Core State Standards. Professional responsibilities, classroom learning environments, planning instruction, assessing achievement, and teaching for meaningful learning for all students are among the areas addressed. Research and theory are connected to applied practice through a field experience throughout the semester. (3 cr. Lecture, 1 cr. Field experience). Must be registered for methods course and ED 303. Open to secondary education licensure majors only.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ED 240/ 240L, junior class status and a passing score on the Communication & Literacy MTEL.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Sociology

  •  

    SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology


    A systematic approach to the understanding of social life. The process by which society emerges, the nature and variety of social groups and organizations, and the development and functioning of major institutions are critically examined. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SOC 215 - The Family


    A study of the American family in the process of adaptation and change: mate selection, commitment and marital adjustment, conflict resolution, singlehood, alternative lifestyles, dual-career marriages, parenthood, divorce, and the family in various stages of development.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SOC 220 - Modern Social Thought


    Sociological theories help make sense of the social influences on human behavior. Readings from social thinkers such as Durkheim, Weber, and Marx to more contemporary writings in the major sociological perspectives help acquaint the student with the development of sociological thinking.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SOC 101 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SOC 230 - Death and Dying


    Students examine attitudes and practices towards death from an individual, historical, and cultural perspective. The social, legal, and ethical implications of dying and death are explored. The class also discusses survivors and understanding the experience of loss.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SOC 300 - Urban Sociology


    An analysis of the effects of urbanization, industrialization, and technological advancement on the structure, composition, and life styles of communities. Emphasis is given to trends in suburbanization, urban renewal, urban social and economic problems, as well as community development policies. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SOC 302 - Social Problems


    The study of societal issues such as health care, drugs and crime, social inequality and of world- wide issues such as population growth, the environment and technology, war and terrorism. Current and alternative solutions to these problems will be analyzed. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education and Writing Designated Core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SOC 320 - Racial and Ethnic Diversity in American Society


    An advanced course dealing with the historical and theoretical causes of the various relations between minority and majority groups found in the United States. Emphasis is on the social, cultural, and social-psychological causes and the individual, group, and institutional consequences of prejudice and discrimination. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Spanish

  •  

    SP 101 - Elementary Spanish I


    For students who have studied little or no Spanish before. This course introduces the foundational elements of the Spanish language, with a focus on the acquisition of basic communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing) as well as knowledge of Hispanic cultures around the world. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    One year or less of high school coursework in Spanish.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 102 - Elementary Spanish II


    This course is a continuation of SP101 and further develops conversational skills and grammar knowledge in the Spanish language. Focus on the acquisition of communicative skills (speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing), in addition to examination of topics related to Hispanic cultures around the world. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 101 or one to two years of high school Spanish coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 201 - Intermediate Spanish I


    This course is a continuation of SP102. Emphasis is on communicative and interactional competence in Spanish by increasing grammatical proficiency, vocabulary knowledge, and conversational skills. Students expand their knowledge of the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures by working with authentic texts and audio-visual materials, and through the production of compositions and oral presentations. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 102 or two or more years of Spanish coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 202 - Intermediate Spanish II


    This course is a continuation of SP201 and builds on previously acquired linguistic and cultural knowledge. Advanced grammatical structures (subjunctive, perfect tenses, etc.) are addressed. Topics connected to the Spanish-speaking world are examined via a variety of authentic Spanish-language media and readings. Emphasis placed on good command of grammar and sentence structure, as well as on communicative and interactional competence (e.g., oral production and listening comprehension skills). Compositions, oral presentations. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 201 or three or more years of Spanish coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 205 - Spain: Art, History, and Culture


    In this immersion experience students study art, as well as the cultural history of Spain, from its origins to the present. The course is taught in English, but there are Spanish language and grammar lessons within the class sessions that emphasize the building of communication skills. This course has forty-two instruction hours (in the classroom and at cultural and historical sites) and four days of excursions. The course is structured with twelve sessions of three and half hours each of which two hours are spent learning about Spanish art, history, and culture and one and half hours practicing survival Spanish.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 211 - Contemporary Spain (Offered in Spain)


    An analysis of the historical reality of Spain from the Civil War and the years of Franco’s regime to the period of economic and social transformation that took place after his death and continues today. The course also analyses the challenges facing Spain in terms of its position within an enlarging European Union, and its relationship with the United States and Latin America in an era of globalization and wide-reaching technological changes. Taught in English.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 225 - Spanish for Health Care Professionals I


    This course focuses on the specific language needs of healthcare workers and is intended for students who have previously acquired the basic fundamentals of the Spanish language. The main objective of this class is to further develop Spanish language proficiency in order to better communicate with Spanish-speaking patients. Emphasis is placed on communicative and interactional competence, and vocabulary of Spanish medical terms. A variety of articles and videos (in English and Spanish) that deal with the intersection of language, culture, and health care in the United States are analyzed and discussed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 101 or one-two years of high school Spanish coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 300 - Advanced Topics in Spanish


    Focus on fine-tuning advanced communicative skills. Taught in Spanish, this course provides students with the opportunity to further develop interactional competence in the language through a focus on speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on developing a good command of grammar and sentence structure, as well as expanding knowledge of Spanish-speaking cultures through film, literature, the modern media, and/or poetry.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 202, or four or more years of Spanish coursework. Course may be taken for credit more than once as long as course content is new.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 301 - Advanced Spanish I


    Focus on improving advanced communicative skills through oral presentation and conversational interaction. Taught in Spanish, the course further develops interactional communicative competence in the language with an emphasis on advanced oral production, vocabulary expansion, and accurate grammar and sentence structure. Students also expand their knowledge of Spanish-speaking cultures through spoken interpretation of film, art, literature, and modern media.  Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 202, SP 300, or four or more years of Spanish coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 302 - Advanced Spanish II


    Focus on fine-tuning advanced communicative skills through written expression and literary analysis. Taught in Spanish, the course further develops interactional communicative competence in the language with an emphasis on writing skills and reading comprehension. Attention is paid to vocabulary expansion, accurate grammar and sentence structure, and deepening knowledge of Hispanic cultures through written analysis of Spanish-language film, art, literature, and modern media. Satisfies the World Cultures General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 202, SP 300, or four or more years of Spanish coursework.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 307 - Spanish Culture and Civilization (Offered in Spain)


    Students are introduced to the general historical and social background upon which the complex reality of present day Spain is built. The course focuses especially on the plurality of cultures-Christian, Jewish, and Muslim-which constituted Medieval Spain and makes Spanish history so unique. This is an advanced Spanish course taught in Spanish, suitable for American study abroad students. Taught in Spanish. 

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 310 - The Cinema of Spain (Offered in Spain)


    An introduction to contemporary Spanish cinema, this course acquaints students with the historical and cultural contexts of Spanish film. Students explore and analyze the works and artistry of prominent Spanish filmmakers. The class is taught in Spanish with the goal of increasing fluency in Spanish.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 317 - Madrid Culture and Art (Offered in Spain)


    Students improve their writing skills in Spanish while exploring the culture and art of Madrid. Topics chosen by students come from the local culture and art found in a variety of museums as well as in the Madrid surroundings. As part of the class, visits to museums and other typical places in Madrid are included. Class discussions, oral presentations, readings, and essay writing are the basis for the course. Taught in Spanish and English.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 322 - Latin American Short Fiction


    Adopting a comparative approach, the course examines how Latin American short stories reflect the region’s culture and history, and each author’s nationality, social class, and political perspective. Writers whose works are studied may include Julio Cortázar, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriel García Marquez, Juan José Arreola, Juan Rulfo, and Isabel Allende. All texts, discussions, and assignments will be in Spanish.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 202 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 331 - Cinema of Latin America


    Students develop their communicative competencies in Spanish and deepen their knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world by discussing and analyzing films from Latin America. Films will be in Spanish with English subtitles, but group discussion and individual writing assignments about the films will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Satisfies the Literary Perspectives General Education requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SP 202 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 410 - Spanish Literature & Performing Arts (Offered in Spain)


    The aim of this course is to read, analyze, and discuss contemporary works of Spanish literature that are also currently being performed in theaters or that have been adapted to screen versions. A major aspect of the course is to study and compare those plays that are representative of each century. The students are expected to attend many of the performances. Taught in Spanish.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SP 420 - Modern Spanish Novel (Offered in Spain)


    A study of the evolution of the Spanish novel from the generation of 1898 to contemporary times. Particular attention is given to the reaction against the realism of the 19th century. The themes examined cover the subject of female novelists and the birth of a more subjective and personal narrative within the context of the European literary movements of the time.  Taught in Spanish.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Special Topics

  •  

    XXX X77 - Special Topics


    Special Topics experimental courses and current issues courses can be offered on a one-time basis. The course prefix (for example, AT for athletic training and PSY for psychology) will vary depending on the department offering the course, and the course number (177, 277, 377, 477) will vary depending on the level of difficulty.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Sport Management

  •  

    SM 101 - Principles of Sport Management


    The goal of this introductory course in sport management is to prepare students to think as sport managers and solve problems utilizing the knowledge obtained through the course. This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of sports as a business enterprise. The student will be able to apply the functions of planning, organizing, leading, and evaluating to the goals of a variety of sport organizations.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 102 - Applied Sport Management


    The course focuses on the application of management concepts and theories in the sport industry and sport organizations. Topics of study include research in the sport management domain, strategic planning, leadership, organizational ethics, and problem solving through case study methodology. The course places strong emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of the modern sport manager.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 101 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 203 - Sport Promotion and Marketing


    Students apply fundamental marketing concepts to the sport industry. Students explore the uses of sport as a promotional vehicle. The course provides an in-depth analysis of sport as a product, sport consumer markets, and sport product markets. Students prepare and organize marketing, promotional, and public relations campaigns.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 102 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 215 - Organization and Administration of Sport


    A study of those procedures necessary for the effective organization and administration of an athletic department. Included are discussions of budget, management styles, eligibility, scheduling, purchasing and inventory, legal liability, and office management.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 102 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 218 - Philosophy and Sport


    In this course, sport is closely examined in relation to our parallel lives by using “great ideas” to bridge some of the gaps between the way we think, know, and feel. The sporting context is utilized to examine moral issues such as cheating, relational justice, and technological relativity. Metaphysical concepts relating to mind and body synthesis and divergence are explored. Satisfies the Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education and Writing Designated core requirements.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 225 - Sport and the Media


    This course introduces the students to aspects of the electronic media as they relate to sports management. Theoretical discussions analyze the role of sport cinema, television, and print as a vehicle for/of social change. The applied aspect of the course focuses on the myriad of sport writing situations and techniques. Guest lecturers from the world of sport media provide insight and context to classroom and field discussions.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 302 - Research Methods and Evaluation Techniques


    This course covers theories and concepts related to research and evaluation. Specific focus is given to action components of the research process including: design and formulation, research strategies, and methodological tools necessary to perform both quantitative and qualitative research. This class prepares sport science majors for Senior Thesis I and II.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Junior year status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 303 - Sport in Society


    Analysis on the past, present, and future impact of sport on contemporary society. Explores the transformation of sport into the present commercial enterprise. Students research the development of sport and the role of men, women, and minorities in sport.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 203, SM 215, SM 218, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 304 - Athletic Event Management Practicum


    Students explore the day to day operations of managing various types of athletic facilities, contests, and functions. This course is designed to prepare students for future careers in various sport management positions. The on-site experience allows for extensive managerial responsibilities including problem solving and personnel coordination.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 203, SM 215, or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    SM 306 - Psychology of Sport


    An examination of the interrelationships between psychology and sport science. Topics include historical perspectives, sport personality, motivation, arousal, anxiety, attention, aggression, self-regulation of psychological processes, sport leadership, group dynamics, sex roles, and racism. Satisfies the Individual and Society General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 335 - Managerial Aspects of Leadership in Sport Organizations


    This course focuses on the application of management concepts and theories related to the management of human resources in sport organizations. Topics of study include strategy, governance, organizational decision making, workplace diversity, and reward systems. Concepts included in this course have a domestic and international focus.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 203, SM 215.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 350 - The Sport Enterprise


    This course integrates the theories of finance, economics, and accounting with sport management concepts. Students study the diverse forms of sport ownership, taxation, financial analysis, feasibility, and economic impact statements. Advanced topics include organizational budgets, financial strategies, and labor economics. Satisfies the Writing Designated core requirement.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    ECN 201, ECN 202 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 365 - Sport Governance and Policy


    This course examines current governance structures and organizational processes of professional, collegiate, and amateur sport. The study of policy in educational, nonprofit, and professional sport organizations is also addressed, with an emphasis on how local, national, and international political organizations relate to sport.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 203 and SM 215 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 379 - Semester Internship Strategies


    This course consists of a series of eight one-hour sessions to help juniors prepare to search for and undertake the full-semester internship. The topics covered include planning strategically for the semester internship, focusing on the internship search, assessing the resume and applying for the internship, interviewing for the internship, participating in mock interviews, and making the most of the internship. Students are required to complete the course before undertaking the semester internship.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    INT100, INT200, junior class status. (Offered fall and spring semesters).

    (Cr: 1)
  •  

    SM 405 - Sport Law


    An in-depth analysis of the legal issues specific to the sport industry. Emphasis on tort liability, contract liability, contract law, and constitutional law. Current legal cases researched and analyzed.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 203, SM 215 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 450 - Sport Venue and Event Management


    Examines the life cycle concepts of sport venue management: design, construction, financing, and operations in private sport clubs, interscholastic and intercollegiate athletics, recreational programming, and professional sport franchises.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 203, SM 215, SM 335, and SM 350 or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)
  •  

    SM 480 - Semester Internship


    A full-semester field experience, this course requires that students apply academic theories to the professional work environment.  The course is planned with and supervised by faculty and site supervisors.  A weekly, on-campus seminar enables students to reflect on their internship experiences, discuss reading and writing assignments that integrate theory and practice, and refine their job search skills. At the conclusion of the course, students deliver oral presentations that clearly articulate their internship experiences, professional strengths, and future career directions.

    Prerequisites & Notes
    All course requirements of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years must be completed, or the school dean must grant permission.  Note: Students completing a distance internship must have reliable internet access; they will be communicating with their instructors via the College learning management system and/or video conferencing. For Senior Thesis I, students should arrange to take the course in the semester before or after internship.

    (Cr: 12)
  •  

    SM 489 - Senior Thesis I


    Senior Thesis I is the first phase of a two-semester thesis sequence through which students lay the groundwork in an area of interest for the original work they are expected to undertake in Senior Thesis II.  Students refine their topics, review and synthesize literature related to their areas of focus, conduct research, and develop research proposals or plans for creative projects.  The final course outcomes consist of both a literature review and a Senior Thesis II project proposal. Note: Students completing Senior Thesis I at a distance must meet the requirements as outlined in the Catalog and seek the permission of their school dean.

     

    Prerequisites & Notes
    SM 302, senior class status or permission of instructor.

    (Cr: 3)

  •  

    SM 490 - Senior Thesis II


    Developing the concept explored in Senior Thesis I, students investigate a topic related to sport management in which they have a particular interest. The outcomes of the project are a scholarly paper and presentation. 

    Prerequisites & Notes
    Senior Thesis I. Note: Students interested in completing Senior Thesis II at a distance must seek the permission of their school dean.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Studio Art

  •  

    ART 125 - Beginning Block Printmaking


     

    The course consists of investigations into the art of block printing; particularly linoleum and woodblock techniques. During the course of the semester students explore the historical and multi-cultural approaches toward printmaking. Students learn to use the tools of printmaking and a printing press to make their own personal creative works of art derived from personal themes including nature, the human form, music lyrics, and abstraction. Students learn theories about printmaking and the production of small editions as well. Satisfies the Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education requirement.

    (Cr: 3)

  • Study Tour

  •  

    XXX X88 - Study Tour


    A semester-long course that culminates in a faculty led field experience.

    (Cr: 3)
  • Victimology